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Hello guys,

Me and the other half are thinking of getting a boxer dog and i was just after a bit of advice from those with more experience than me. I work from home three days a week and whilst I am confident I can meet the exercise needs of a boxer I was just wondering how they behave around their owners during the day. Although I will be there for these days to walk the dog morning, afternoon etc between these times I really need to concentrate on work (for a full working day with a couple of breaks in between) Will a boxer crave constant attention from me all through the day or, provided the dog is exercised properly, will I be able to work properly??

Thanks in advance for any replies.
Mark.
 

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Hi Mark,

Welcome to the forum!

I don't necessarily have any experience with the situation you're thinking of, but I've been home for summer with a boxer, and it's difficult to ignore them. They can be demanding of attention. Every dog is different, however.

You can try doing a series of tests with a puppy or dog to gauge how independent they are. Boxers tend to be very affectionate dogs and need attention from their owners, but a more independent boxer should be able to allow you breaks, especially if they're tired.

A tired boxer is a well-behaved boxer, but that doesn't necessarily mean you'll always be off the hook. Boxers get bored easily, and when they're bored, they can get into trouble, just like any dog. Supervision is essential, whenever you can provide it. When you can't, you need to make sure you have control of their environment. (The objects in the parts of the house they have access to, for example.) Being tired helps, but it doesn't make it go away. To wear a boxer out, you might have to do more than just walk them. Consider training them to walk and jog beside you while you ride a bicycle.

With enough consistent training, consistent patience, and engaging exercise, you should be able to get your work done, but expect the first year to be pretty touch and go. It'll be difficult for your dog to ignore you when you're home all the time, but eventually, if you're patient, you can teach your dog to allow you to work.

I stress that it will likely take quite a bit of work. When you first bring the dog home, you'll be training them how to behave and working at the same time. I mean that while you're working, you should be reinforcing calm, quiet, and non-interruptive behaviors from your dog. For example, let's say that your dog has been smothering you with affection while you're trying to work, and they get the clue that you're being "boring" and they leave you alone, maybe laying down.

"Good dog!" and treat. They calm down, and lay down. "Good dog!" and treat. You should expect to do this consistently for a while until they really grasp the concept, and even then, you should continue reinforcing the behavior. When you take breaks, play with them if they're being calm and quiet, but give them time to calm down before you go back to work. Go back to being "boring" and when they calm down and leave you alone, "Good dog!" and treat. You can also use a clicker for this.

These are just my thoughts and recommendations and I am not a professional dog trainer, haha.

Have you thought about training classes or involving a professional trainer in your dog's life?
 

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All I can add is dogs are work, any dog...the first year is very demanding and even up the the 2nd year on a boxer. The early training, housebreaking, etc. takes time, lots of time if you want a good dog in the end. But yes you can do it. I crate trained my dog so he was in his crate until it was time to take him out or feed or have a playtime. He spent much time there learning to stay in it and to be quiet. Some dogs/puppies have anxiety issues and just carry on and on in the crate, some learn in time. I would suggest if you want a boxer or any puppy that you go to a reputable breeder where you will have a better chance on getting a puppy with a stable personality and perhaps one that is already crate trained. You also have the option of going to a rescue and getting a full grown boxer that will match your personality and you won't have all the training issues. Yes it will still have to adapt to you and your ways but for "work" purposes you may be better off. Just my opinion...
 
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