Boxer Breed Dog Forums banner

1 - 15 of 15 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,349 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hey all so at the moment I am debating on whether or not I should get some insurance for Vega. I am unsure if it is something worth getting or not. I hear a lot of pros and cons but there is never any true reasons for them. So I was wondering if anyone here has insurance and if it works out pretty well or not?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
521 Posts
I'm interested in this as well.  we looked into it, but apparently a lot of stuff isn't covered if it's considered "breed specific" which is everything under the sun for these guys :/

I'm interested to hear feedback on this.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,757 Posts
I had VPI for Buster and it didn't really pay for anything. They are really good for yearly checkup's and emergency situations. Like if he got hit by a car or broke his leg. In Buster's case it didn't really pay for anything because he had just about every congenital/hereditary problem you can think of, and they don't cover any of those conditions. He had knee, hip dysplasia, and cardiomyopathy, which they do not cover.  Most of them have an additional cancer policy, but that cost extra. I guess it's just like any other insurance...sometimes they pay...sometimes they don't. The way I look at it, I can take the monthly premiums and put it away and if god forbid I ever need the money for an emergency, I'll have it. Just make sure you read the policies very carefully before signing up with any company.  :wink:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
905 Posts
Well we have it for Hector and Tink and I wouldn't be without it, but from what I gather the insurance market is very different in the US.  Our policy will pay for any illnesses (breed specific or congenital) as long as they weren't existing at the time you took the policy out.  So if either of them develop hip dysplasia, for instance (touch wood!), the policy will still cover them.

It also covers emergency surgery up to
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,641 Posts
I had insurance for the first year I had Chloe and I didn't really care for it.  I had submitted 4 claims during that time, and 3 out of the 4 I had to fight with them to get the money back, not to mention it took forever to receive the money. I ended up canceling and started doing what Tootsie mentioned. Taking the monthly premium and putting it aside.  $60.00 a month adds up quickly. Also I have a credit card put aside for Chloe it's thru care credit http://www.carecredit.com/ it works just like a credit card but you can't use it at stores and such and Chloe's vet accepts it so there is no forms or anything to fill out.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,757 Posts
I'll have to look into the care credit, I've heard nothing but great things about that.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18,306 Posts
I've heard both good and bad things, so I opted not to bother with it..It seems that more is not covered than is..Now if we had the ability to get insurane like Honeyec has on her 2, it would definitely be worth it...I'll also look into the care credit, that sound sinteresting...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,349 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
Yeah I think I will just start putting money aside and if anything (God forbid) happens to Vega and the funds are not readily available then I will go with the credit care. The thing that kind of got me with the insurance is you still have to pay for it all up front. So you still better have the money.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,718 Posts
I have VPI for Lola.

They cover everything except:
Congenital or hereditary defects or diseases.
Elective and cosmetic procedures.
Expression or removal of anal glands or anal sacculitis.
Breeding or conditions related to breeding.
Diagnostic tests and treatments for conditions excluded by the policy.
Diseases that are preventable by vaccines.
Behavioral problems.
Orthodontics, endodontics and removal of deciduous teeth.
Diagnosis, medical management, or surgical correction of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) damage or rupture during the first 12 calendar months of policy effectiveness.

We've submitted 3 claims so far and have almost made back the money that we paid for the insurance.  I like it, but the bf isn't sure it's worth it.  For more information the website is petinsurance.com  You can pay upfront or monthly payments.  Not sure what we'll do next year, think I'll read up on the care credit!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,349 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
So I have gotten a list together of all the boxers congenital and hereditary disease's. Assuming what I've read here and in policies, these would not be covered. :roll:

Abnormal dentition: abnormal placement, number and development of teeth.

Acne:
same thing as in humans, affects the muzzle and lip areas.

Allergies: same as in humans. Dogs can be allergic to things they come in contact with, eat or inhale.

Atopy: an allergy caused from things dogs inhale.

Atrial septal defects: a malformation of the dividing wall between two chambers of the heart, usually resulting in a hole which then causes blood flow abnormalities.

Cardiomyopathy: a disease of weakened heart muscles. Common in giant breeds, boxers, Doberman pinschers.

Cataract: as in humans, a change in structure of the lens of the eye leading to cloudiness and usually to blindness.

Corneal ulcer, superficial: an erosion of the outer membrane and outer surface of the cornea.

Cutaneous asthenia: a condition where the skin lacks its normal strength, elasticity and sensation. Also called Ehlers- Danlos syndrome. Seen in several breeds, including English springer spaniels and boxers.

Cystinuria: an abnormal excretion of a substance (cystine) in the urine.

Demodicosis: a kind of skin disease (mange) caused by microscopic Demodex canis mites living within the skin layers and producing an immunodeficiency syndrome.

Dermoid cyst: a small growth composed of skin-like structures.

Distichiasis: abnormally growing eyelashes

Ehlers-Danlos syndrome: a connective tissue disease characterized by loose, hyperextensible and very fragile skin that tears easily

Endocardial fibroelastosis: an abnormal condition of scarring of the muscles of the heart

Entropion: an abnormal rolling in of the eyelid.

Esophageal dilatation: an abnormally large and usually flaccid esophagus.

Eversion of nictitating membrane: a condition where the third eyelid is protruding.

Factor II deficiency or hypoprothrombinemia: a rare deficiency of prothrombin, a clotting factor needed to control bleeding.

Factor VIII deficiency or hemophilia A: the most common severe inherited clotting disorder of humans and nonhuman animals. Inhereited as a sex-linked recessive trait (carried by females and manifested in males). Affects most dog breeds.

Gastric torsion: a condition where the stomach twists, thereby impeding input and output.

Gingival hyperplasia: overgrowth of the gum tissues.

Granulomatous colitis: a type of chronic inflammation of the colon characterized by reactive tissue growths.

Hepatic portosystemic shunt or arteriovenous fistula: a malformation of blood vessels in the liver or an abnormal communication between the arteries and veins in the liver.

Histiocytoma: a tumor composed of certain skin tissue cells (i.e., histiocytes).

Hyperadrenocorticism or Cushing's disease: a disease where the adrenal glands are overactive.

Hypothyroidism: a common endocrine disease where the body produces an abnormally low amount of thyroid hormones. An autoimmune destruction of the thyroid gland which affects more than 50 dog breeds.

Lymphocytic thyroiditis: an autoimmune disease causing inflammation and destruction of the thyroid gland, which becomes infiltrated with lymphocytes (white blood cells) and leads to hypothyroidism. This is the most comon endocrine disease of the dog and has an inherited predisposition.

Mastocytoma: a rare cancer developing from a type of tissue cell known as a mast cell.

Osteochondritis dissecans: a specific form of inflammation of the cartilage of certain joints which causes arthritis.

Osteochondrosis: a group of developmental diseases resulting in abnormal formulation of joint cartilage. Commonly involves the shoulder, stifle, hock or elbow.

Pododermatitis: a skin infection of the paws

Progressive retinal atrophy: a disease where the retina slowly deteriorates, producing night blindness.

Sertoli cell tumor:
a tumor of the testicles which secretes estrogen and causes feminization.

Spondylosis: a malformation of the vertebrae.

Squamous cell carcinoma: a cancer arising from the squamous type of skin cell.

Sternal callus: a thickened, hairless area forming on the chest of an animal.

Subaortic stenosis:
a tightening of the outflow opening for blood to go from the heart into the aorta. Common in golden retrievers and Newfoundlands.

Syncope: a brief period of fainting or collapse.

Thyroiditis: an autoimmune inflammatory disease of the thyroid gland.

Ulcerative keratitis: an inflammation of the cornea characterized by the formation of ulcers.

Vaginal hyperplasia: an overgrowth of tissues of the vagina.

von Willebrand's disease: a type of bleeding disorder caused by defective blood platelet function. Occurs in 59 dog breeds but most often in Doberman pinschers. An autosomal trait affecting both sexes.

I hope this information helps.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18,306 Posts
That's quite a list!! I didn't see Hip Dysplasia on there and I'm pretty sure that it's not covered either...That's why I would just as soon take my chances. It doesn't seem worth it to fork out $60 a month and still have a lot that isn't covered..I realize they cannot cover everything, but it seems that it's just good for basic care and that's about it...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,939 Posts
This is one area that I feel very lucky, because I work in the field and do not incur many/if any cost on veterinary care....
But, I have heard many negative things about VIP and the lack of repayment on funds. I can tell you that when a form is submitted before payment, to your animal hospital that form asked if "whatever" was done  would be breed specific involved....As Mizorie listed above.....What is not?  Most things are for most breeds.

Unfortunantly most Pet Insurance is like Human Insurance and to some degree it is an alliance between doctors, insurance companies and drug companies....Trust me there is paperwork a mile long for your vet office to fill out too.

My suggestion is:  Care Credit or to obtain a Visa/Mastercard through the SPCA and save it for your four legged baby.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,718 Posts
We pay $27 a month and that's for the highest coverage they offered.  So I didn't think that was too bad.  The SPCA card seems like something worth looking into.
 
1 - 15 of 15 Posts
Top