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How do you train a Boxer?????  I've never had trouble training any of my other dogs but I'm having a rough time with Bee Bee.  She still goes to the bathroom on the floor, always getting into things when we're not there, etc.  I guess I'm just not doing something right.

I'm afraid she's going to get into something that's going to really be harmful to her.  I try to put everything away that I can and make sure nothing unsafe is out.

Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated at this point. :?
 

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Have you tried a crate? If not, you might want to start crate training her to keep her safe, and to keep you sane with her pottying issues. Good luck with beebee. Remember she is still new to the household, she needs time to adjust.
Here are some great tips taken from florida boxer rescue for crate training.

Utilizing a dog crate correctly, is not an exercise in cruelty. A properly trained dog sees a crate as his safe haven or "home." Crating is a very safe way to house your dog while you are not home, as well as an effective way to potty train.
When you crate your dog, you take away the household dangers associated with free roam (such as access to poisons, cleaning products, electrical cords and countless items ripe for chewing). You also discount the myriad assortment of dangers awaiting your dog outdoors, (such as taunting by neighborhood children, poisonous frogs and snakes, bee stings, unpredictable Florida weather, pest infestations like fleas, ticks and mosquitoes, rabid animal bites, dangerous mulch and floral beds, and the possibility of digging out of a fence, getting lost, stolen, or hit by a car)!
As previously mentioned, if used correctly and not abused, your dog will learn to love his crate and may go inside freely to take naps or chew on toys.

Who "needs" a crate?  

Dogs who would benefit from proper crating would be those who have separation anxiety or who tend to "get into trouble" when left with free roam of the home. Many Boxers are quite content to, when you leave, jump on the couch by the nearest window overlooking a driveway and they won't move again until they hear your car pull up! They are completely trustworthy and wouldn't be inclined to chew up remote controls, coffee tables or granny's beloved heirloom throw rug.

However, remember, Boxers are first and foremost PEOPLE dogs and they love their families. Some don't do well when left alone at all, and express said anxiety through chewing up things they shouldn't. Not only is this aggravating to the human, but more importantly, it is dangerous to the dog. An item lodged in the throat, stomach or intestines can be life threatening and/or costly to remove. These dogs would benefit from the comforting feeling a crate can provide.

Selection and position

Make sure the crate you select is the correct size. Your Boxer must be able to comfortably lie down, stand up and turn around without ducking his head or crouching down. There usually is a list of appropriate breeds of dog on the box of each sized crate but when in doubt, "go bigger for Boxer."

Putting the crate in a quiet corner of a family room would be ideal as the Boxer can go there on his own to get away from the hustle and bustle of everyday life, but still be able to see his family. If there are multiple dogs in the home, it is best to position the crates so they can all be together and see each other. This simple strategy can alleviate much of the anxiety that comes with being left alone.

"Dog, meet Crate."

Introduce your puppy or full-grown Boxer to the crate by initially leaving the crate door open for him to investigate, sniff, and go in and out on his own. It is completely acceptable and recommended for this first step to take several days if not weeks, if you sense any apprehension on the dog's part.

When your Boxer seems comfortable with the crate, put bedding and some treats or toys inside, and encourage your dog to enter using soft, high, friendly speech. Once in, gently close the door and speak softly to your Boxer. Tell him to lay down. Leave the room and go where he cannot see you. If your Boxer cries or barks, wait (I know it's hard) for him to stop, and the second he does, enter the room, praise him like crazy and offer a treat and hug as you let him out.

Practice this a few times a day for a couple of days. Gradually try to increase the time you stay away, as long as the dog is doing well with being separated from you.

By the end of the first week, you could be able to stay away for 15-30 minutes.

This is a gradual process that takes time, patience and care. If you rush your dog into crate training, he may be afraid of it, and loathe the time he has to be in there, which is the exact opposite of how you want him to feel when he is in the crate. Remember, you want him to WANT to go in there and have his quiet time.

NEVER use his crate as a punishment. If you do it even once, you destroy the entire context of what the crate stands for--his quiet place to be when you are not home. You never want to give his "home" a negative connotation. Don't punish him in it. Don't use his crate for time out. Find another area, perhaps a gated off room, if you need a space for time out.

How long is too long?
As stated many times on this website, Boxers are "people dogs" and don't do well left alone for extended periods of time. They are not dogs recommended for people who work long hours. They do very well in homes with people who are around a majority of the time. Crating a dog for more than 8 hours a day is excessive, in our opinion. There are other options like hiring a pet sitter or dog walker or enrolling your Boxer in doggie daycare a few days per week.

Tips for s-u-c-c-e-s-s

Always walk your dog and give him the opportunity to relieve himself before and immediately after spending time in his crate. By doing so, you give him a routine, and he will soon learn that he has two specific opportunities to go potty, thus decreasing the incidence of accidents inside the crate.

Always place one or two safe chew toys ( KONG stuffed with peanut butter or biscuits, nylabones) in the crate to keep your Boxer stimulated and busy! Never leave bones, rawhide products, Greenies
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I have a crate but I don't think it's quite large enough for her.  Might have to invest in another one.  I feel really bad doing that.

See at my house I have 2 other dogs plus a caretaker comes in 6 hours a day to take care of  my 95 yr old grandmother.  She's not too bad when she's there.  It's those few hours that I'm gone until she gets there and visa versa in the evening.

I may have to do this although with 2 other dogs roaming it makes me feel bad. :(

Thanks for the tips though.  Definitely something to think about.
 

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I agree with Lisa, a crate may be a good option for you, even if it is just a few hours. It's safer on her and safer on your house as well...I think I am using the extra large plastic crate, I wanted Samson to have plenty of room as housebreaking wasn't the issue....Right now, if I go somewhere, Angel is crated & Samson is not, so do not feel bad!!! We add our own guilt in a lot of times and make matters worse.
 

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Great information on how to with the crate.  I'm trying to crate train Sophie, but so far all she has learned is to yelp, scream, and howl at the top of her lungs.  I feed in the crate and that's all the time she spends in it now.  She is perfectly happy to be in it if the door is open, but the second I close it, all h__l breaks loose.  I'm hoping that after the move this month, things improve.  But I think you should make your post a sticky as it is very helpful.
 

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I would definitely recommend crate as well. We put a hot water bottle and a tshirt that one of us has been wearing...(kind of weird but works  :)) That usually makes her feel safe and comfy. And every time we put her in or take her out we take her outside. She is doing really well with the training so far. We also take her out after everything..playing, sleeping, eating. The last couple of days she has actually been going to the door!

Good luck with all of her training, I'm sure she'll come around.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks everyone.  Looks like I'll be shopping around for a larger crate for her. THe one we have just isn't large enough for her to be in all day.

I appreciate all the comments and suggestions.
 
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