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Hello

Gino is our 1 yr old boxer.  He seems to get smelly pretty quick.  Maybe it's because we live in an apartment so I notice it more.  After we pet him you can smell him all over your hand.  I know dogs are animals so they have a smell but it's clearly different.  Just a few days after a bath he gets pretty stinky.  I do know that he sweats.  When we aren't home he must sweat from a bit of anxiety because that's always when it's the worst.  It's not a gas smell but clearly a body odor.  I don't want to switch foods at this point because Blue Buffalo seems to be working pretty well....but will if I have to.  

I also noticed that his coat doesn't seem to be as tight and shiny as other boxers.  Does anyone have a good shampoo for this?  What can cause this?

Also.  A few weeks ago we noticed Gino's paws bleeding.  It was right around the base of the nails.  Like where we have cuticles.  It always seemed to happen after we walked him.  We do notice now that he refuses to walk over the de-icer(salt) all over the place at our apartment.  At this point can we think it's because of the salt and ice?

Thank you

Advice/recommendations...greatly appreciated.
 

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I would think food is probably the issue.  Boxers don't usually stink.  Also, dogs don't sweat, but they do have sebaceous glands.  How much are you bathing your dog?  You may be sending his sebaceous glands into overdrive if you bath him too often.  May want to get him checked for an infection.  That was the only time Cooper smelled like a dog when he had a secondary skin infection.
 

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I thought dogs didnt have sweat glands, thats why they pant.  Maybe im wrong.. not sure.

If you ad some oil to his kibble it could help with his coat.
 

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There are some great stickys on the different foods, who feeds what, and grading dog food under food tip and diet info forum. I started both of mine on Nutro Ultra and their skin, coats, and pads are amazing now. However, I will add that all dogs are different and you will have to see what works best with yours.
 

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I believe the only sweat glands on a dog are on their foot pads...someone will correct me if I'm wrong; also walking your dog over de-icer salt if not good for the foot pads and can be very painful for them, and if he is bleeding near his cuticles I would suspect this is why he doesn't want to walk over the salt anymore
 

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I would also be very careful on de-icer.   Kash ate some (de-icer) in a snow bank and it cause a bad reaction with his tummy.   So just in the winter months, make sure they are not walking over it, becuase if they go to lick their paws, may have a reaction:)
 

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Here is an article I found with some good info on this topic...it's a bit long but worth the reed


Winter - is your Pet Ready?

Welcome to winter! Many of us are not ready for this blast of Arctic conditions and our pampered pets are not ready for this cold and frosty weather either. The foot problems of your dog could be one of many.

Dry Cracked Pads
Many dogs are not living outdoors all the time so their haircoat and foot pads are confused. Sometimes they are warm and dry, sometimes they are cold and wet. As a result, the normal toughening adaptations that occur this time of year for outdoor dogs do not occur. So when a soft, thin footpad comes in contact with ice, very quickly it dries out and small cracks can form similar to what can happen to our finger nails when exposed to the dry, cold air. Small amounts of bleeding can occur from these cracks and they can quickly seal over. Many times it is impossible to see where the blood is coming from. The solution to this problem is to toughen up the pads with some creams and ointments or provide little booties for your dog. One brand of Canadian made "Mutt-Lucks" is particularly effective but there are other alternatives available.

Cut Pads
That fine crust of ice that can form on top of the deep snow can be very sharp when broken. Some years are particularly worse for this problem than others. In addition to the ice crust, the snow can hide other sharp hazards such as broken bottles, sharp metal or wire. Again, indoor dogs are more at risk as their pads are not as tough and leathery as outdoor dogs. When the footpad is cut, there is no question where the bleeding is coming from. I have seen animals with cut arteries that have experienced life threatening haemorrhage from a very small cut to their foot. All cuts to the pads would heal best if they are stitched as soon as possible. Twelve hours is the ideal for uncomplicated healing. If the wound is not closed by surgery, a scar can form over the injury. This scar is more likely to stick to ice, much like our tongue or fingers stick to cold metal. If a scar does form and cause problems, it can be removed but this is more involved than attempting to heal the cut in the first place.

If your dog does get a cut to the pad, do not use a tourniquet. The best treatment is a pressure bandage applied directly to the area of haemorrhage. Dish towels, socks, or any other similar materials make good bandages when wrapped tightly around the whole foot. Tourniquets must only be used with caution as they can shut off the blood supply to the whole leg and can cause more damage than the help they can give. After the bandage is applied, seek veterinary attention immediately.

Salt
Not only is salt an enemy of your car, boots and sidewalks, your pet's feet are very sensitive to the drying and caustic action of road salt. If there are any small cracks in the pad, this salt in the wound stings very badly. Many dogs will be hesitant to go outside after a few experiences with this sudden pain. Sometimes, salty paths are unavoidable but wash your pet's feet as soon as possible after they have been exposed.

Broken Nails
When walking and slipping on the icy surfaces or digging for hidden treasure in the snowbank -- toenails can be broken easily. The blood supply to the toenail is amazing, and because of the nature of its shape, they can continue to bleed for hours! I have had many emergency calls from people who have tried various home remedies to stop the bleeding but the best home remedy I have found is to hold a pinch of flour against the broken nail. However, if the nail is broken short and the "quick" or nailbed is exposed, veterinary care should be sought as the "quick" is directly attached to the bone and infections can set in quickly.

Strains, Sprains & Ligament Injuries
Many dogs love this time of year and run around like the puppies they think they are. However, when they suddenly do the splits on an unexpected spot of ice, they and you both realize that they are not puppies anymore. Muscle and ligament strains are possible but if any injury persists, it should be assessed by your veterinarian as the rupture of knee ligaments is a common injury for the slightly overweight, slightly out of condition, overexcited dog.

Arthritis
This enemy of man and beast is always worse in the cold and damp. If you are giving aspirin or similar drugs to your dog, I would strongly consider getting in contact with your vet about some new pain medications that are much safer and more effective.
 

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It is also possible that there is some yeast issues going on especially with the bleeding around the toe nails area which is a good spot for yeast.  You already got some good advice on the snow salt and it always could be a food issue.  You can add oils and egg to the diet to help with a better coat if there are not skin issues with yeast and/or infection.  I give Fiona a bath about every 2 months and in between use baby wipes but you have to get to the bottom of the smell in your case I would think.  Also, it could be an issue with the anal glands if they are full they can cause a dog to smell because they lick their bottoms taking in the funky stuff and then it can cause an all over body odor.  You can ask your vet to check them or express them or show you how to do it at home :) I would suggest having the glands and skin checked out before switching foods.....
 

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Something else you can do is take some baby wipes and use them to clean his coat, but adding to his food is probably the best..Mine love the sardines in olive oil & raw eggs..Also in the winter, especially in a cold climate, dry skin can be a problem as well....
 
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