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My mom's boxer is 10 months old, his name is Caesar, and he's quite the handful. The biggest problem is that you can't lay down on the couch without him in your face, pouncing on you, biting at your hands, barking at you, etc. I was over there yesterday and thought I could try and break him of this bad habbit...but nothing was working. I tried ignoring him...that just made it worse, I tried a firm NO!...he just barked at me, I tried a calm, but firm no...same result. Finally I firmly grabbed his collar and held him in a sit position until he relaxed...that seemed to work...until I layed down again. My mom said she deals with this every time she wants to lay down on the couch. What are some tips and/or tricks that she should practice to break him of this? He's already not allowed on the couch...though it doesn't seem to stop him from thinking he can climb on up whever he feels like it (when he does he gets an immediate 'down' comand).
 

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We used time outs with Sadie. When she would freak out like that with nipping and barking etc if the "no" "ouch" or "no bite" and replacing with toy didn't work, we would put her on her lead and tie it to a door nob in the next room and leave her for about 2-5mins she caught on pretty fast that her behavior was causing her to be in a time out. She hated them, it was hard for us to listen to her cries but she is not nearly as bad as she was. She still has her bouts but now the no bite seems to work or just leaving the room. The time outs are only 1 every two weeks or so now. She is still young as well. Good luck! I'm sure you'll get some great ideas.
 

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When Kiah talks back, I give her time outs in my half bath for a minute or two.  Liz suggested it and it works wonders for her and she hardly gets time outs anymore (still is jumping on guests at first though she is doing better).  Just make sure you don't do time outs in his crate if he has one.
 

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Definitely some time outs would be very helpful..It's possible that Ceasar isn't viewing your mom as an Alpha person and that's why the bad behavior...A power struggle so to speak..Firm voice and commands and consistency..Also he's at the age where he is testing his authority as well....Also you can try keeping him on a leash, that would give better control as well..
 

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All boxers are different IMO, and the behavior IMO I tend to think may fall on the owner.

My sister has two, and they get overly excited when you go to their house.    They have had no formal traning and therefor rule the roost per se.

My dogs will get excited with new people but calm down and go about their ways after a few.  I think adding stucture and training and adapting the NILF (Nothing in Life is Free) tactic helps a lot and teaches who is ruling who!      Make the boxer work for attention and for food.     I use time outs for diciplinatey measure and they seem to work well.  

If the dog is barking in your face, then I would personally ignor the dog, walk away.   The dog wants attention IMO.   That attention I would give when the dog gives me what I want.  A sit, a command or something.   I would research the NILF technique and maybe adopting this can help your mother with her mouthy friend.
 

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Abby has barking fits too...frequently it invovles her wanting us to play with a toy...I have started giving her time outs also..I take the toy away and make her sit/stay until she relaxes. When we are consistent, it works, although I have not tried giving her time outs in another room yet.
 

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NILF isn't always an appropriate technique, especially for someone that isn't familiar with it.  If done inappropriately, you can end up with an irritated and frustrated dog that has become worse or even destructive.  I've had to go in and re-train and modify bad behavior resulting from ppl using NILF the wrong way.  All because their owner hasn't set up clear boundaries, rules, and limitations and isn't consistant enough.  She should actually research trainers in her area.
 

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Yes Liz, I agree its not for everydog, hence why I said to research it and see, because with some it does make a difference.  Everyone has to try to find the right technique (as in food) that works best for the dog!  

If the owner is firm (and sets up and sticks with their boundries) and undersands what they are asking and what should be expected, it can (the added structure) be ok for the dog.
 
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