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I always worry about her getting bloat. Are the elevated bowls better? Also how long after eating should she go for a walk?
 

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I always wait about an hour and a half after any meal. Not sure what the time limit is, but it works for us. Also have to remember after they exercise and are breathing really hard not to let them gulp down water or feed them.

Not sure about the elevated bowl. Have read pros and cons for both ways
 

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According to most of the vets I know, feeding from the floor is considered safest, unless you are feeding arthritic or elderly dogs who have specific care requirements to make eating easier. But I am very interested to hear others opinions on this.

This is an excerpt taken from a Knowledge Summary by Louise Buckley PhD RVN

Vol 2, Issue 1 (2017)
Reviewed by: Wanda Gordon-Evans (DVM, PhD, DACVS) and Bruce Smith (BVSc, MS, FANZCVS, DACVS)

Clinical bottom line

There are only two studies that study the effect of raised feeders on the risk of Gastric Dilatation Volvulus (GDV) and their findings conflict. Only one study found a significant effect of feeder height, with large and giant breeds fed from a raised feeder being at an increased risk of GDV floor fed dogs. However, these authors found that, where the feeder was raised, the height of the feeder that increased the GDV risk was affected by the size of the dog. Large breed dogs were more likely to develop a GDV if fed from a bowl ≤ 1 foot tall, whereas giant breed dogs were more likely to develop a GDV if fed from a bowl > 1 foot tall. No studies found that feeding from a raised feeder reduced the risk of GDV relative to feeding from the floor. Therefore, the safest option in the absence of further evidence is to advise that owners of ‘at risk’ dogs feed from a feeder on the floor. This may not reduce the risk of GDV, but there is no evidence to suggest that it will increase the risk.
 

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I always wait about an hour and a half after any meal. Not sure what the time limit is, but it works for us. Also have to remember after they exercise and are breathing really hard not to let them gulp down water or feed them.

Not sure about the elevated bowl. Have read pros and cons for both ways
I follow the same time frame as Matt74; I wait 1 1/2 to 2 hours after a meal before going on a walk. I never feed right after returning from a walk or right after an energetic play session.
 

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I do use elevated bowls I find my dogs eat much better and drop less food. I have never had a problem with elevated bowls. In fact they don't want to eat off the floor level.I also think they are swallowing less air my dogs are not gassy either like I hear so many people complain about their boxers so who knows? I also never walk or let my dogs run for at least 2 hours after eating and I don't let them gulp large amounts of water either. I have had 6 boxers now and this seemed to have worked for all of them.
 

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I also follow the same protocol of exercise, no vigorish exercise 1 1/2 hour prior or post meal. Now I will take them for a walk but I am a slow walker. For our boxer I put his bowl on top of a bucket, as he was straining and slipping eating off the floor, he looked very uncomfortable, our standard poodle (also a breed prone to bloat) takes his food bowl on the floor. Its funny they have two distinct ways of eating, Boxer really doesn't chew his food basically gulps, poodle takes small bites and chews . Takes him 3 times as long to eat.
 

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Yes fleas will hop off a dog onto a person and your house can become infected with fleas they will get into your carpet and furniture. Its best to control fleas with a topical flea product for your dog you can buy these anywhere. The Vet has some products for fleas that are a once a month pill you may want to consider asking your Vet which they recommend for your dog.
 

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Bloat is potentially deadly. For kibble feeders, I would offer 2-3 scheduled meals daily. Make sure your dog remains quiet for about 1.5-2 hrs after each meal. Adding in a quality probiotic and digestive enzyme is always a good idea. Never allow your dog to fill on water to cool them off. If your dog has been playing and is excessively panting, pick the water up until panting stops and then place it back down.

I’m a raw feeder so we have less risk for bloat. I switched my crew to raised food dishes about 5 years ago. They seem far more comfortable when eating. We also have quiet time after our meals and follow the same rules for water after playing. I can say that I have never experienced bloat in the 20 years of owning boxers and we have any where from 5-8 living with us at any given time.
 

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I follow the same rules for feeding I do feed twice a day I feed very early in the morning so they have a good 3 hrs before exercising after eating usually they get a scrambled egg too when I am eating my breakfast. Then they eat in the evening again before we go to bed I have used raised feeders as well I was thinking they are swallowing less air that way and will take their time eating as they are at a comfortable height.
 
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