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Hello all,

We have two lovely Boxer dogs, the oldest is now close to adult age at 1 1/2 years old.

A few months ago, we decided to add a second addition to our family and we also have a 4 month old female.

We are finding it increasingly difficult to supervise them both when they are "boxing" one another, as he plays very rough with her.

He bites/tugs at her ears, grabs her legs in his mouth and tries to shake them (sometimes when she is standing!) and sometimes snaps at her randomly or knocks her flying when they are wrestling.

She occasionally yelps in pain, but he doesn't always stop what he is doing that is hurting her, which is where we have to intervene.

We were just wondering what is the best way to deal with him when he is playing too rough, as we often separate them and tell him firmly "No," but he often carries on the same as before. (Stubborn!)

As a side note, the little one thoroughly enjoys wrestling with him until he starts to hurt her. I don't want to discourage either of them playing like they do, as when the oldest is behaving, they both love it!
 

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Hello all,

We have two lovely Boxer dogs, the oldest is now close to adult age at 1 1/2 years old.

A few months ago, we decided to add a second addition to our family and we also have a 4 month old female.

We are finding it increasingly difficult to supervise them both when they are "boxing" one another, as he plays very rough with her.

He bites/tugs at her ears, grabs her legs in his mouth and tries to shake them (sometimes when she is standing!) and sometimes snaps at her randomly or knocks her flying when they are wrestling.

She occasionally yelps in pain, but he doesn't always stop what he is doing that is hurting her, which is where we have to intervene.

We were just wondering what is the best way to deal with him when he is playing too rough, as we often separate them and tell him firmly "No," but he often carries on the same as before. (Stubborn!)

As a side note, the little one thoroughly enjoys wrestling with him until he starts to hurt her. I don't want to discourage either of them playing like they do, as when the oldest is behaving, they both love it!
I'm a single dog household, so if I just had to guess if the older male wont listen to commands and continues to go after the younger girl, I would leash and use commands till he settles down. This would be at your discretion when you think he is being to rough and not listening to you. Like you said, you don't want to discourage them playing.


There are posters here with multiple boxers in the household. Hopefully they will chime in and give you really good advice that they used.:cheers:
 

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Hello all,

We have two lovely Boxer dogs, the oldest is now close to adult age at 1 1/2 years old.

A few months ago, we decided to add a second addition to our family and we also have a 4 month old female.

We are finding it increasingly difficult to supervise them both when they are "boxing" one another, as he plays very rough with her.

He bites/tugs at her ears, grabs her legs in his mouth and tries to shake them (sometimes when she is standing!) and sometimes snaps at her randomly or knocks her flying when they are wrestling.

She occasionally yelps in pain, but he doesn't always stop what he is doing that is hurting her, which is where we have to intervene.

We were just wondering what is the best way to deal with him when he is playing too rough, as we often separate them and tell him firmly "No," but he often carries on the same as before. (Stubborn!)

As a side note, the little one thoroughly enjoys wrestling with him until he starts to hurt her. I don't want to discourage either of them playing like they do, as when the oldest is behaving, they both love it!

About the older one almost being an adult..they say boxers mature slower than other breeds. Ours for sure did...not saying you are wrong..just a note as some argue they never mature. :)

Our 3 boxers are all males. We introduced our puppy, Bandit, (he'll be 2 in April) to our older boys (they are 5 now) when Bandit was about 8 weeks old. We have never crated our dogs, but they have had pens or areas in the house when they were younger.

When we brought Bandit home we had one pen (wrap around baby pen) in our room for him to sleep in, and one in our living room for during the day. Bandit had a collar and was on a leash for probably 2-3 months if he was out of the pen so we could teach him what was OK and what wasn't.

As for the play- we oversaw their play interactions for the first few months. We thought our older boys would respond well to a puppy, and they did. Jax, our older brindle alpha naturally took the lead in playing with and teaching Bandit. Tundra, our fawn older male is much more timid, and while he's clumsy, he's gentle.

We supervised their play and if it sounded like they weren't play talking/ growling, we would tell them no or stop and they would. Bandit was still learning, so sometimes we had to separate him.

Our older boys did and so snap at Bandit if they want him to leave them alone. Bandit tends to be the more aggressive player, and he's the first Boxer we've had that goes after the legs on the others. He mostly does it to Tundra. Tundra learned to sit down when Bandit did this and of course he had to stop or get his head smooshed.

When they snap, Bandit stops. They don't bite, it's just a warning to stop.
We were used to the sounds our boys made playing, so we could tell when they were starting to sound agitated, and we'd intervene. I'd say if you are not comfortable with any of the sounds either of them is making, to stop them.

The older boys would stop if bandit yelped, and he will do the same. I'd recommend supervising more and keeping them away from each other more if you can't supervise them to help them learn what is OK and what is not.

Keep in mind the puppy has sharp teeth and your older male probably doesn't understand this and thinks the puppy is hurting him- maybe first and he's 'responding'. Make sure the puppy has lots of things to chew on, and that she knows not to bite you, and she'll learn how hard she can bite over time.

I would be concerned about the older one shaking the legs on the puppy, and make sure that is a NO. As for the ears, as long as there's no pain or marks, I would not be concerned.

All of our boys still think they are little puppies (they are 80+ Lbs each). They are all still lap dogs. Your older one probably has no idea that he's so much bigger than the female.

It's great that they play together. I'd recommend some clear boundaries and more supervision until they know what those boundaries are.

I'm sure others will have more advice....that's my input. Hope it helps.
 

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Hello all,

We have two lovely Boxer dogs, the oldest is now close to adult age at 1 1/2 years old.

A few months ago, we decided to add a second addition to our family and we also have a 4 month old female.

We are finding it increasingly difficult to supervise them both when they are "boxing" one another, as he plays very rough with her.

He bites/tugs at her ears, grabs her legs in his mouth and tries to shake them (sometimes when she is standing!) and sometimes snaps at her randomly or knocks her flying when they are wrestling.

She occasionally yelps in pain, but he doesn't always stop what he is doing that is hurting her, which is where we have to intervene.

We were just wondering what is the best way to deal with him when he is playing too rough, as we often separate them and tell him firmly "No," but he often carries on the same as before. (Stubborn!)

As a side note, the little one thoroughly enjoys wrestling with him until he starts to hurt her. I don't want to discourage either of them playing like they do, as when the oldest is behaving, they both love it!

About the older one almost being an adult..they say boxers mature slower than other breeds. Ours for sure did...not saying you are wrong..just a note as some argue they never mature. [img= class=inlineimg]https://www.boxerforums.com/images/smilies/icon_smile.gif[/img]

Our 3 boxers are all males. We introduced our puppy, Bandit, (he'll be 2 in April) to our older boys (they are 5 now) when Bandit was about 8 weeks old. We have never crated our dogs, but they have had pens or areas in the house when they were younger.

When we brought Bandit home we had one pen (wrap around baby pen) in our room for him to sleep in, and one in our living room for during the day. Bandit had a collar and was on a leash for probably 2-3 months if he was out of the pen so we could teach him what was OK and what wasn't.

As for the play- we oversaw their play interactions for the first few months. We thought our older boys would respond well to a puppy, and they did. Jax, our older brindle alpha naturally took the lead in playing with and teaching Bandit. Tundra, our fawn older male is much more timid, and while he's clumsy, he's gentle.

We supervised their play and if it sounded like they weren't play talking/ growling, we would tell them no or stop and they would. Bandit was still learning, so sometimes we had to separate him.

Our older boys did and so snap at Bandit if they want him to leave them alone. Bandit tends to be the more aggressive player, and he's the first Boxer we've had that goes after the legs on the others. He mostly does it to Tundra. Tundra learned to sit down when Bandit did this and of course he had to stop or get his head smooshed.

When they snap, Bandit stops. They don't bite, it's just a warning to stop.
We were used to the sounds our boys made playing, so we could tell when they were starting to sound agitated, and we'd intervene. I'd say if you are not comfortable with any of the sounds either of them is making, to stop them.

The older boys would stop if bandit yelped, and he will do the same. I'd recommend supervising more and keeping them away from each other more if you can't supervise them to help them learn what is OK and what is not.

Keep in mind the puppy has sharp teeth and your older male probably doesn't understand this and thinks the puppy is hurting him- maybe first and he's 'responding'. Make sure the puppy has lots of things to chew on, and that she knows not to bite you, and she'll learn how hard she can bite over time.

I would be concerned about the older one shaking the legs on the puppy, and make sure that is a NO. As for the ears, as long as there's no pain or marks, I would not be concerned.

All of our boys still think they are little puppies (they are 80+ Lbs each). They are all still lap dogs. Your older one probably has no idea that he's so much bigger than the female.

It's great that they play together. I'd recommend some clear boundaries and more supervision until they know what those boundaries are.

I'm sure others will have more advice....that's my input. Hope it helps.

Hello!

Thank you for the great advice, it's good to know what others in households with more than one Boxer dog have handled situations, as this is not only our first two Boxer dogs, but the first time we have had more than one dog in the household!

I absolutely agree that our oldest Boxer has a way to go before he can be considered an adult dog, we have heard around 2-3 years for them to mature from our vet, yet many Boxer owners we have spoken to have told us they never grow up, haha!

The leash sounds like a great idea, and one I hadn't thought of, as it will allow us to intervene sooner and separate them easier.
Kovu (the oldest) is definitely the more aggressive player than the youngest, she is quite happy having a tussle and then quietly slinking off for some peace, whereas Kovu is absolutely relentless and never gives up.

I will keep my ears open for any change in play growls/noises they make. The youngest is quite squeaky and high pitched so perhaps it sounds like she is in pain when really she might just be a little more vocal.

Funnily enough, Kovu seems to be teaching her to bite more softly, as her bite is quite gentle when she's wrestling with us. I think he's taken the brunt of that training for us, bless him!
I forget that he must have been bitten a little too hard numerous times before she learned to be more gentle, so that's a good point that he may be biting back in frustration or pain at times.

We do have a collapsible play pen, so I might get that out again and do what you siggeated, as Kovu was crate-trained but the youngest hasn't been. It might teach them both to have boundaries, or maybe just a simple time out when things are getting a bit too rough.


P.S. Your three Boxers sound so sweet and lovely, I wish I could have a house full of them! (It took some major persuasion getting my partner to agree to having a second Boxer haha!)
 

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I too have multiple dogs and I do at times keep them separated. They are all crate trained. The boxer I just get off occasionally and my st poodle I use the leash method to correct him. I also have a pet convincer which has helped.When he is grabbing the boxers legs, tail or ears biting t them, I gave him shot of air with the command no bite. Now he licks and if he is play biting nicely I let it go until he becomes to excited as the boxer is laid back. I also use a short leash so I can just grab it and its short enough he would get tangled in it.
 

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Hello!

Thank you for the great advice, it's good to know what others in households with more than one Boxer dog have handled situations, as this is not only our first two Boxer dogs, but the first time we have had more than one dog in the household!

I absolutely agree that our oldest Boxer has a way to go before he can be considered an adult dog, we have heard around 2-3 years for them to mature from our vet, yet many Boxer owners we have spoken to have told us they never grow up, haha!

The leash sounds like a great idea, and one I hadn't thought of, as it will allow us to intervene sooner and separate them easier.
Kovu (the oldest) is definitely the more aggressive player than the youngest, she is quite happy having a tussle and then quietly slinking off for some peace, whereas Kovu is absolutely relentless and never gives up.

I will keep my ears open for any change in play growls/noises they make. The youngest is quite squeaky and high pitched so perhaps it sounds like she is in pain when really she might just be a little more vocal.

Funnily enough, Kovu seems to be teaching her to bite more softly, as her bite is quite gentle when she's wrestling with us. I think he's taken the brunt of that training for us, bless him!
I forget that he must have been bitten a little too hard numerous times before she learned to be more gentle, so that's a good point that he may be biting back in frustration or pain at times.

We do have a collapsible play pen, so I might get that out again and do what you siggeated, as Kovu was crate-trained but the youngest hasn't been. It might teach them both to have boundaries, or maybe just a simple time out when things are getting a bit too rough.


P.S. Your three Boxers sound so sweet and lovely, I wish I could have a house full of them! (It took some major persuasion getting my partner to agree to having a second Boxer haha!)
I'm by no means an expert, but I'm happy to share what we have experienced and hope it helps. They all get into their grooves as a pack and it can be hard to know when to step in, and when to let them work it out.

Bandit plays the roughest of our 3, and Jax plays pretty rough too. I don't have a lot of data to back it up and this is a broad statement, but it seems that the brindles tend to be more hyper and play rougher than the fawns. This is for the ones we have had and known over the years.

I know what you mean about having more. I joke with my husband that if we won the lottery we'd have a mass of boxers...while I'd love that, I also know we couldn't give them the attention they would deserve with that many. I think I wore him down a bit to get the puppy- but he agreed with the logic that when one of our other boys pass (they are litter mates) the other is going to be lost. I wanted 3rd for other reasons too, and it's a good number for us. If we had more, I'd be sleeping on the floor, they are such bed hogs (LOL)!

We are blessed that my husband works from home, so that helped too- although Bandit has still chewed up things w/ him in the house....
I can see arguments for crates...but as a choice, it's not for us.

Let us know how the leash and pen do to help. (The leash helped to potty train Bandit too, you are probably well past this stage, but it helped him to go to the same area and to do his business before he could play with whatever toy in the yard was taunting him). :)
 

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We have been testing out the leash in the house along with generally just separating them both when they are getting a bit too playful (and noisy!) & the leash has worked wonders.
I have been leashing the oldest (with a slip lead) and giving him a slight correction/pull when he is starting to go overboard.

It's worked really well as he is starting to understand that if he gets a little tug along with a firm "No," that he needs to tone it down and be more gentle.

We will also leash our younger pup as she can sometimes become overly excited and start nipping him.

There is nothing quite like two Boxers playing, I sometimes find myself watching them for ages, they really do give it their all haha!
 

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We have been testing out the leash in the house along with generally just separating them both when they are getting a bit too playful (and noisy!) & the leash has worked wonders.
I have been leashing the oldest (with a slip lead) and giving him a slight correction/pull when he is starting to go overboard.

It's worked really well as he is starting to understand that if he gets a little tug along with a firm "No," that he needs to tone it down and be more gentle.

We will also leash our younger pup as she can sometimes become overly excited and start nipping him.

There is nothing quite like two Boxers playing, I sometimes find myself watching them for ages, they really do give it their all haha!

I'm glad things are getting better! It's a process for sure, and they learn pretty fast with consistency.

I still take videos of them playing. That's one of the great things about boxers, no matter how old they are, most of them love to play.
 
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