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Discussion Starter #1
Hi.Im new to the forum and had a few questions I wanted to ask.I recently got a new boxer puppie,a great male I named Shaft!Well I really want a female  to grow up with Shaft.This is not for the purpose of breeding but I just want another boxer.I got my male through my brother in laws family who bread them.They gave him pick of the litter and since he has one already(and he knew i wanted one) i got my first one.So here are the questions

1.How can i locate breeders In central NC?

2.How much is avarage price for 1?

3.What does brindle and fawn mean?


thanks in advance
 

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My best advice to you (and advice that I follow closely) is advice that was given to me by my mentor -- never have two puppies under the age of two in your home at once! Boxers tend to go through a "terrible two's" stage when they hit anywhere from 8 months to about 2 years of age in which their sole purpose seems to be to make you pull every last hair from your head! :lol: Personally, I would wait until your little boy is a bit closer to two before bringing another into your home. This way, you can wait to see how his personality will develop, so that you can see which personality will best compliment his.

You will also be able to get to know your future breeder, and ensure that they perform all of the proper health tests to rule out common genetic problems in boxers (heart, hips and thyroid - a simple "vet check" or "the vet saying that mom and dad is healthy" is just not enough!) Tests that should be performed on the puppy's parents are: 24 hour holter monitor to check for Cardiomyopathy, Echocardiogram/Color Flow Doppler to check for Sub-Aortic Stenosis, a full thyroid panel to check for thyroid disease, and OFA Certification or PennHIP radiographs to check for canine hip dysplasia. A reputable breeder will be able to show you proof that these tests were done via results on printed paper or scanned in on the computer. And even though there are no guarantees with living breathing creatures, health proven parents are still your best chance at a healthy happy puppy that will live a long and happy life.

When looking for a new puppy, your best bet is to contact your local boxer club and see what breeders will have litters planned. Make plans to attend dogs shows (you can find them on http://www.infodog.com) and speak with breeders there. Dog shows are a wonderful way to meet a whole lot of breeders all in one place!

The Tar Heel Boxer Club is in North Carolina: http://www.tarheelboxerclub.com/

Prices will vary by location, color of the puppies (purchase prices on white puppies tend to be lower) and the breeder breeding the litter. Price should not, however, be your primary consideration in purchasing a new pup; rather the genetic health and temperament should be the foremost concern.

Brindle and fawn are the two acceptable colors in boxers. All boxers are technically fawn, and brindle is nothing more than a marking pattern that appears over the fawn base. Fawn as a color would be considered as "tan" or "brown" by novices to the boxer breed, and the brindling covers over the fawn in a black striping pattern. Approximately 25% of all boxer puppies are born white, which makes them far from rare. The white color is not acceptable by our breed standard (the blueprint for what a boxer should look and act like) therefore white boxers should never be bred. They make wonderful pets and companions, however, and the only additional concern that one should have with regards to purchasing a white baby is that whites do have a higher percentage of deafness which can present training issues further down the road.

I'm attaching photos of two of my girls - the first is fawn and the second is brindle:





White "socks" and white markings on the face is called "flashy" and black faces with minimal foot and leg markings is called "classic" or "plain". In other words, the first girl in the photos above is considered to be "flashy fawn" and the second is called "plain brindle" or "classic brindle".

Good luck! Hope this helps! You are doing a good thing by starting your research early - this is not a decision to be taken lightly as it is one that is likely to last for the next 10-14 years of your life! ;)
 

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Jessica, as always you give "spot on" advice & I could not have said it better....There are too many "backyard breeders" out there & it is in your best interest and your dogs to make sure you can get the best possible companion. It pays to be picky & ask questions as it's a big commitment....
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Its not that i want to go cheap,but i dont have the first clue where to look for a "good" breeder.Also I was also thinking about a rescused boxer of like 2 years or so,how do they do?anyone got one?
 

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Thanks Willow!  :oops:  :)

Sweetzo,
I know that your first consideration isn't finding a pup on the cheap, I did want to point out the other things to consider as well though. I fully admit that my first consideration was price when I purchased my first dog through the newspaper, simply because I didn't know that all of the other things went into carefully planning a healthy happy litter of boxer puppies. :)

Just know that many reputable breeders are "turned off" to a buyer when they ask about price in the initial email. It's just that they've put so much blood sweat and tears into their babies that they take it as a bit of an insult, that's all.

I do volunteer with rescue and I can honestly tell you that it is a *wonderful* way to go!

(I'm going to steal from my website here to save myself a bit of typing! :lol: )

There are many wonderful boxers currently in rescues all over the United States. If you are looking to add a wonderful companion to your family, please consider boxer rescue. Sure boxer puppies are just too cute and a whole lot of fun, but they are also a whole lot of work!

There are added advantages to adoption. Rescue boxers come in all shapes, colors, and sizes, and ages range from pup to senior. Also, when adopting an adult or older dog, there is no potty training stage to worry about! Many rescue boxers come with obedience training and all are up to date on vaccinations and spayed or neutered!

One of the big misconceptions about rescues is that they all have behavioral problems. . . This is simply not true. While, yes, *some* may have behavioral and/or training issues, the majority of our dogs come in as a result of other reasons. We get dogs in from divorce situations, terminal illness on the owners part, new job/relocation out of the country and dog is too old to travel well, new baby and don't have time for the dog (ugh), and other reasons.

Many of these dogs were once beloved pets and have just found themselves on the "outs" because of their owners sheer irresponsibility.

Hope this helps! Good luck in your search! You are doing right by asking questions, as this is the only way we learn! :D
 

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I second the thought about rescue. I've had 2 rescues, Tia at age 9 months & my current love, Samson who was 6 when I got him. Tia was physically abused & so was Samson, but I tell you, they both are the sweetest, even tempered, lovable dogs you could ever want. I truly believe, they make such wonderful pets as they are grateful to be going to a "forever" home. Try rescue, I don't think you will regret. If it works, then maybe go for a puppy 8) .. Hope all this has helped you. I'm sure there is a good boxer rescue near you,, check online, there is a complete list and good luck..
 
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