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Discussion Starter #1
I hope I spelled that right  :D
can feeding raw cause it.
I'm asking because since I changed my dogs diet, my 3yr old boxer has been
limping, maybe just a coincidence. He probably just bruised something while playing.
any who they're doing great on the raw diet. (so far) :thumbup:
 

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Jordane,
I have NO idea! :lol:

Try posting your question to the BARFing boxers list, there are a few others there who might know the answer to your question.

On the aside, I'm SO glad to hear that your guys are doing great so far, how did the switch itself go? Also, what are you currently feeding?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
BurningRiver\";p=\"664 said:
On the aside, I'm SO glad to hear that your guys are doing great so far, how did the switch itself go? Also, what are you currently feeding?
Thanks  :D

The switch went great :!:  Right now I'm feeding chicken wings and turkey wings,
and some cornish hens tonight, and the other day gizzards and hearts.
I still get a little nervous about the bones.



Penny
 

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I'm not sure if dog can get gout, I suppose it's possible but I haven't really heard anything about it.  Gout is caused by high uric acid concentrations, which is linked to purines; in Dalmatians, this causes urinary stone formation rather than gout.  High purine foods are organ meats like liver and kidney, some fish such as anchovies or sardines, mushrooms, spinach, asparagus.  If he's not getting high amounts of these foods, it's probably more likely that he's injured himself, but certainly it's something to watch.
 

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Great! :D

You might want to work a bit more meat into their diet, simply because wings do contain quite a bit of bone. I try to shoot for more of a 'prey model', meaning that when not feeding the whole animal, I take into consideration the ratio of bone to meat that would otherwise be found in the whole animal.

The easiest way to do this is just to cut up a whole chicken, rabbit, turkey, fish, whatever, and serve the parts over the course of a week. The cornish game hens should be great for this, and should be pretty balanced.

If feeding backs, wings or necks exclusively, I'll try to work an all meat meal (like ground beef, chicken or turkey) in somewhere.

I tend to gauge by stool quality. If the stools are small dried balls and whitish/yellow in color, or if they fall apart as they're coming out, there's too much bone in the diet. You need to be careful of this as it can be hard on the liver and kidneys, and it can cause constipation/impaction. Ideally, you want them to be well formed and to come out in one nice, firm connected movement that tends to be a medium brown to a dark brown, depending on what protein source you're feeding (beef tends to be darker than poultry).

Sorry! TMI and way too graphic, I'm sure!  :lol:
 

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Yes they can, although the canine version of gout is not identical to the human one. In humans, it's a buildup of uric acid in the bloodstream called hyperuricemia that, over time, deposits crystals of uric acid in the sinuvial fluid around the joints. This causes a specific kind of arthritis. In dogs, as far as I can tell, the definiition is extended to any mineral-like deposits on the joints, in the sinuvuial fluid, or anywhere nearby. However, either of these diagnoses are hard to make without a serological study being performed.
Note that in humans and dogs, this condition heralds potential for kidney disorders.
Unless you have cause to specifically suspect canine gout over trauma or a more general arthritis, I would inspect for trauma and treat for pain.
In any case, if this condition has persisted for over a few days, you need to get the dog to a vet.
 
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