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Discussion Starter #1
Are Boxers hard to train?  I've had the pleasure of watching many in basic obedience classes and they seem to be class clowns much to the frustration of their owners.  I understand dog training, but do they ever look at you seriously and say "Okay, I'll sit for ya, this one time." :lol:
 

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Kiah has her days at class when she does everything right and then there are those other days....obedience commands mom - have no idea what that means.  Oh look, there is sometime to play with and toys!!!!  :oops:
 

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I just received confirmation of Merlin's enrollment in beginning obedience classes starting September 17th. Can't wait (I think) to see how he does!
 

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I wouldn't say they are hard to train, they are very intelligent tho and that in itself sometimes is a problem..I found with mine that repeating the same command over and over does not work...So I make it more of a game, change up the commands, how they have to be done to keep it interesting, then they do very well..Having said that, boxers are notorious for turning a deaf ear when they choose, that gets frustrating...Angel is very intelligent, but also hard headed and her & I have butted heads, once literally, on several occasions, so I had to alter the way I train to suit her..I think that is the key, you have to sometimes use a lot of different methods to keep them interested, which is challenging, but the rewards are worth it....
 

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Discussion Starter #5
samsonsmom\";p=\"26411 said:
I wouldn't say they are hard to train, they are very intelligent tho and that in itself sometimes is a problem..I found with mine that repeating the same command over and over does not work...So I make it more of a game, change up the commands, how they have to be done to keep it interesting, then they do very well..Having said that, boxers are notorious for turning a deaf ear when they choose, that gets frustrating...Angel is very intelligent, but also hard headed and her & I have butted heads, once literally, on several occasions, so I had to alter the way I train to suit her..I think that is the key, you have to sometimes use a lot of different methods to keep them interested, which is challenging, but the rewards are worth it....
Excellent!  This sounds very much like a Rottweiler.  When they get it, they get it and don't ask them to do it over and over again or one of 2 things happens.  They shut you out or they goof it up thinking they've done it wrong and training becomes well, a chore frankly instead of something fun you do together.  I've found it to be true in most breeds that frequent short training sessions work better than 1 hour sessions.
 

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I took my male Rottie through beginning & advanced obedience training and he did wonderfully - always wanting to please. I hope I'm as lucky with Merlin!
 

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Yea I learned with my first Boxer, Buck, that the traditional method of repition just didn't work, he would get it, then as I made him do the same command over and over, he would mess up...Back to the books and learned that Boxers do not do well with that kind of training, plus keeping the sessions short I was able to get him to learn much more..... :) No different than kids really..I think that is part of the fun, cos it also keeps us on our toes somewhat
 

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Kiah is very treat motivated so I use that when starting her on a new command with a lot of praise.  When we practice it is only for about 10 minutes and I try to do it several times a day.
 

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I have no experience with training a boxer, we're a work in progress, but what I do know is they are very intelligent and learn fast.
 

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Boxers absolutely require obedience training to teach them proper manners. If they are not going to receive training, you will have one unruly boxer on your hands!  8O
They are a breed that need a job to do. A boxer that is expected to behave in every day situations will regard "obedience" as his regular "job." Boxers do not respond well to repetition, they get bored very easily. They will excel when given a few short and fun training sessions. Repeating a command when they have already done it correctly can be counterproductive. They are very intelligent. They know when they did it right--and you know that they did it right. Make it fun, don't keep repeating and move on.
They are not a breed who will do what you say when you say it, every time you say it! Boxers are noted for being a bit stubborn,  :roll:  which sometimes earns them the false reputation of being "stupid." If you stick to a non-repetitive and fun training routine, they will most likely be the most awesome companion you could ever hope for. A Boxer lives to please his human. It is imperative that you use positive reinforcement techniques when training also. Physical, harsh, or violent reprimanding is never recommended, nor is it acceptable for any animal, but boxers are extremely sensitive and hitting or reprimanding will only take the training steps backwards because now they have to earn your trust again to become your best friend.
So, yes they are the "class clowns" of the canine world.  :D  I guess that's one of the reasons we love 'em!  :D
 

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Discussion Starter #11
tootsie\";p=\"26435 said:
Boxers absolutely require obedience training to teach them proper manners.
I am of the opinion all dogs benefit from training.

tootsie\";p=\"26435 said:
It is imperative that you use positive reinforcement techniques when training also. Physical, harsh, or violent reprimanding is never recommended, nor is it acceptable for any animal, but boxers are extremely sensitive and hitting or reprimanding will only take the training steps backwards because now they have to earn your trust again to become your best friend.
Positive training is the ONLY method I use.  I just don't understand trainers that use harsh methods or worse insist on using a prong collar on a puppy.  It is a sad day when I see that.  I keep a bait bag at my side during all my training sessions (whether it's my dog or I'm giving a lesson).  The power of praise and a small treat to reinforce a correct behavior are my tools and I have well behaved happy dogs to prove it.

Now in the same breath I will tell you each one of my dogs owns and wears a prong collar as adults.  My dogs are much to powerful to be allowed to wear anything less. AND Rotties are known for testing every second of their lives, so a gentle reminder of who's on the of the leash is what I use it for as well as proofing a trained dog during exercises in preparation for trials.  There's a reason for using a prong collar and used correctly is a wonderul training tool, however used incorrectly can ruin a dog.
 

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I used a prong collar on my Rott also. I do plan on using one on Merlin the boxer too. I've tried walking him with just a regular collar and he actually walks me - he's way too strong without a little help!
 

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Discussion Starter #13
sbudd\";p=\"26443 said:
I used a prong collar on my Rott also. I do plan on using one on Merlin the boxer too. I've tried walking him with just a regular collar and he actually walks me - he's way too strong without a little help!
I don't know if you've tried this training technique or not, but it helped me with Moses, so I'll share.
 

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When Rascal (my pit bull) was alive he wore his prong collar when we went out, even at 15 he was still very strong.
 

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All of the Boxer's I've trained are class clowns, but when they get it...they get it!!!  If you keep training fun and playful then they get it faster.

sbudd---you can use the same technique that Rottsnbox outlined here without the leash in your house or in the fenced in area of your yard.  Sometimes with a Bxoer teaching them to heel off leash is really useful.  When they have that down pat, then you can add the lead.  Whe they get it that way...then you can start adding distractions.
 

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In our first obedience class our trainer spent a good portion of the class explaining the differences in training collars and their proper use.  I thought it was a good use of time.
 
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