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I have a 7 1/2 month old boxer puppy that turns crazy come dark. We have only had him for 2 1/2 months and he has come a long ways but he has a long ways to go. The people that had him before us was not able to spend enough time with him and he was crated a lot. We work so he is kept in a crate/wire cage during the day. Most days he is in there around 6 hours. I come home the first thing I do is let him out and go in the yard for throw/fetch/chase with toys and balls and try really hard to wear him down. Once he lays down or goes to the door to get back in to cool off then I go in the house to start dinner. Once my puppy is calm and cooled off I feed him his dinner. Once again he has free to run in and out playing whatever he wants to do. Once it's cooled down to a bearable temperature (live in the south) around 7 or 7:30 we head off for a 2 to 3 mile walk EVERY night. Once we have completed his walk he comes back in and he is calm and tired until around 9 when it's time for us to settle down for bed. My puppy starts biting/nipping doing everything he is not suppose to do chewing on furniture running and grabbing everything he can get his mouth on that does not belong to him. He has a lot of toys laying around for him to chew on. We start taking him back outside for a quick fetch/chase game in the yard to tire him out again and now he is worse. He is now so hyped up you can not even touch him everything then is a challenge and now he is clueless what the word NO means. At this point we start making him go back outside by himself and he sits at the door wanting back in. We wait 2 minutes and we try to let him in again sometimes this can go on for a hour of us making go back outside to calm down and making him wait at the door for up to 15 minutes. Once you have him in the correct state of mind he will come back in the house go get on his bed and he is out for the night. I do not want to make the outside a bad place for him but I am at a lost as to what else to try. I have read and tried everything I could find. The vet recommended the cage/crate we live in a small house and the cage is in the living room and he will not stay in there when he can see us. At times I feel like I have a toddler who is so tired but can not seem to fall asleep if that makes sense almost overstimulated. Help! Please only helpful tips we love this puppy and would never do anything that could be damaging to him. I feel we give him lots of attention and love and all we ask is not to nip. Bedtime is a nightmare at my house.
 

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well exercise is not always the answer. You need to work more on training. Mental work (i.e. training) actually will tire your guy outt more than chasing a ball. He is still a puppy and boxers do tend to act like teenagers at this age. There are some good and free training videos google jeff bellman solid K9 training along with Leesburg. You may also want to enroll in a local class. Teaching him to walk on a leash at a loose heel would also be good for him, along with the usual sit, down stay. You will read about the place command and sit on the dog these will help a lot. Sit on the dog you basically have him on a leash while your siting on a chair, just sit on the leash and it teaches him to just lie down calmly next to you, he can't really go off. These you will also find in the videos, Also some treat puzzles or a kong stuffed with som w of his dinner to occupy him. Ours is now 4 and he has totally calmed dow.
 

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well exercise is not always the answer. You need to work more on training. Mental work (i.e. training) actually will tire your guy outt more than chasing a ball. He is still a puppy and boxers do tend to act like teenagers at this age. There are some good and free training videos google jeff bellman solid K9 training along with Leesburg. You may also want to enroll in a local class. Teaching him to walk on a leash at a loose heel would also be good for him, along with the usual sit, down stay. You will read about the place command and sit on the dog these will help a lot. Sit on the dog you basically have him on a leash while your siting on a chair, just sit on the leash and it teaches him to just lie down calmly next to you, he can't really go off. These you will also find in the videos, Also some treat puzzles or a kong stuffed with som w of his dinner to occupy him. Ours is now 4 and he has totally calmed down.
Thank you Linda, last night was our first training class and the trainer actually said he may need more mental time right before bed to see if that will help. Her suggestion was unsweetened applesauce frozen overnight in his kong. So maybe we can get on track and try more training and less anxious about how much we exercise daily. My girl boxer was not this hard and she was a love bug but not this one he gets all hyped up and you can not even touch him. Once again thank you!
 

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OK well ... the first step is to "Chill Out." You can't your puppy if your freaked out.:)

And more than likely "most" of your "issues" are because unlike your girl ... this puppy was not a "blank Slate" as it were??? As a "Rescue" you should have started a bit differently?? And that would have been something very similar to the first link here. :

https://www.germanshepherds.com/forum/5296377-post8.html

That "process" helps to establish, Rules,Structure and Limitations. But hey ... not many of us start that way, cause we did not know?? And those that don't do it that way (myself included) tend to have "issues down the road??? What we don't know at the time ... is that all issues, start at home and how the dog lives with you??

It's a "pay me now or Pay me later" kinda deal, happens all the time. So not doing that (the first link) or some semblance thereof, was the first mistake. The second mistake and we'd go round and round on Germanshepardforum, was the mistaken belief that "Exercise Cures All??"

Short of a Pug, a Bulldog (Non skateboarding or surfing BullDogs) a Dane or a Mastiff, a two legged Human Bean, will "Never" out exercise there dog??? People try the "Exercise Cures All" thing, all the time and it's usually a fail???

Moving on, what you've taught your puppy so far ... is what he is already very good at?? Go,Go,Go ... Most dogs and Boxers in particular don't, really need any coaching for that??? What most dogs need and "Working Breeds" in particular, is to learn to "Chill" and to cope with doing "Nothing!" Coping with doing "Nothing" is a "Thing" and it needs to be taught and trained.

And I doubt your "Applesauce in a Kong" trainer understands that??? But hey I don't know at any rate, I'll let that go. So ... you need to make some real changes, in what you are doing?? And that should start with well as been mentioned mental stimulation, 2 to 3 mile week walks every night is a bit much??? And you kinda skipped out on how he does that with that?? Is it a proper "Structured Walk??" Which while important (and my thing actually) ... is not really exercise. Does the walk or is it a to 3 mile pulling contest?? If it is ... that is not helpful??

At any rate, there are two things you need to start doing, in order to get your "puppy under control" and they are not hard but they do requirement "commitment" and they will "Train Calmness" into you dog/puppy." And again (training calmness into a dog) ... is a "Thing." Train the Placement Command and Dog Sit on the Dog. That is how you train your puppy to cope with doing nothing! Details are here.:
https://www.boxerforums.com/training/183298-fearful-anxious-flat-crazy-place-command.html

And as regards he does not care about you saying "NO??" Well ... without "Consequences for a Dog/Puppy" saying "No" means uh ... "nothing??'" If you have not been able to do so, thus far they "you" need to "enforce" No with a proper tool. :)

Simple enough but that's another topic. Trying to keep this relatively short for me! Welcome aboard sorry your having "issues" at the moment. :
 

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OK well ... the first step is to "Chill Out." You can't your puppy if your freaked out.:)

And more than likely "most" of your "issues" are because unlike your girl ... this puppy was not a "blank Slate" as it were??? As a "Rescue" you should have started a bit differently?? And that would have been something very similar to the first link here. :

https://www.germanshepherds.com/forum/5296377-post8.html

That "process" helps to establish, Rules,Structure and Limitations. But hey ... not many of us start that way, cause we did not know?? And those that don't do it that way (myself included) tend to have "issues down the road??? What we don't know at the time ... is that all issues, start at home and how the dog lives with you??

It's a "pay me now or Pay me later" kinda deal, happens all the time. So not doing that (the first link) or some semblance thereof, was the first mistake. The second mistake and we'd go round and round on Germanshepardforum, was the mistaken belief that "Exercise Cures All??"

Short of a Pug, a Bulldog (Non skateboarding or surfing BullDogs) a Dane or a Mastiff, a two legged Human Bean, will "Never" out exercise there dog??? People try the "Exercise Cures All" thing, all the time and it's usually a fail???

Moving on, what you've taught your puppy so far ... is what he is already very good at?? Go,Go,Go ... Most dogs and Boxers in particular don't, really need any coaching for that??? What most dogs need and "Working Breeds" in particular, is to learn to "Chill" and to cope with doing "Nothing!" Coping with doing "Nothing" is a "Thing" and it needs to be taught and trained.

And I doubt your "Applesauce in a Kong" trainer understands that??? But hey I don't know at any rate, I'll let that go. So ... you need to make some real changes, in what you are doing?? And that should start with well as been mentioned mental stimulation, 2 to 3 mile week walks every night is a bit much??? And you kinda skipped out on how he does that with that?? Is it a proper "Structured Walk??" Which while important (and my thing actually) ... is not really exercise. Does the walk or is it a to 3 mile pulling contest?? If it is ... that is not helpful??

At any rate, there are two things you need to start doing, in order to get your "puppy under control" and they are not hard but they do requirement "commitment" and they will "Train Calmness" into you dog/puppy." And again (training calmness into a dog) ... is a "Thing." Train the Placement Command and Dog Sit on the Dog. That is how you train your puppy to cope with doing nothing! Details are here.:
https://www.boxerforums.com/training/183298-fearful-anxious-flat-crazy-place-command.html

And as regards he does not care about you saying "NO??" Well ... without "Consequences for a Dog/Puppy" saying "No" means uh ... "nothing??'" If you have not been able to do so, thus far they "you" need to "enforce" No with a proper tool. :)

Simple enough but that's another topic. Trying to keep this relatively short for me! Welcome aboard sorry your having "issues" at the moment. :
Good morning Chip,


Thanks for your suggestions all is welcome. Well the applesauce in the kong did not really work last night, he loved it but afterwards he was back to the nipping/biting and just crazy and the only way to settle him down is the time out. On a good note last night's time out of sitting outside at the door was only 1 minute long and he came back in the house went to his bed and sleep all night. He loves the walks and walks very well on the leash. The first 10 minutes of our nightly walks is a lot of smelling and then he will walk does very good. Keep in mind if he sees someone he stops and lays down because he thinks everyone is suppose to give him attention. Walks are not a nightmare at all. He is a very strong will dog and it's very frustrating to us inside the house at night time as I believe it is for him also. It's like he it all out of sorts and unsure what to do. He can be laying in the floor playing and chewing on a toy and just in a instant he changes and he starts the running wild jerking these that are not his and the whole nipping thing. I am going to start working on the sitting on the leash and see what happens with that. We started a training class on Tuesday night so last night off and on I continued to work with him on heel and focusing on me for a treat in the yard and actually I felt like he enjoyed it but that was before dark. I am not sure what happened after dark before us but he can not overcome that time. He is a sweet smart boy who seems to think he can rule our house and us with the nipping/biting/mouthing (whatever you call it, it hurts).
 

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Maybe tr y leashing him to you at night when he starts this rough biting and nipping and put him thru the paces, sit, down. stay, walk around him...you can also purchase a pet convincer on Amazon. Its just compressed air and when he starts this behavior puff, no, sit good boy...if he listens.
A little story I keep one in my pocket as I'm still training my st poodle and it will immediately stop him from jumping. There was a family on bikes with their dog cycling with him on a retractable leash. As he came past us, my dog gave a bark, was told no and put in a sit. HIs dog pulled him over to us as when his dog got to close to me I pulled out my convincer and squirted him. LOL his dog backed up but the guy gave me this really odd look, Like "what the xx why did you do that! I didn't want to get in a conversation so I said its just air.
Kept him out of my space and stopped him from getting to my dog. His dogs nose was a millimeter from my leg. I really like having this tool on me. LOL
 

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Good morning Chip,


Thanks for your suggestions all is welcome. Well the applesauce in the kong did not really work last night, he loved it but afterwards he was back to the nipping/biting and just crazy and the only way to settle him down is the time out. On a good note last night's time out of sitting outside at the door was only 1 minute long and he came back in the house went to his bed and sleep all night. He loves the walks and walks very well on the leash. The first 10 minutes of our nightly walks is a lot of smelling and then he will walk does very good. Keep in mind if he sees someone he stops and lays down because he thinks everyone is suppose to give him attention. Walks are not a nightmare at all. He is a very strong will dog and it's very frustrating to us inside the house at night time as I believe it is for him also. It's like he it all out of sorts and unsure what to do. He can be laying in the floor playing and chewing on a toy and just in a instant he changes and he starts the running wild jerking these that are not his and the whole nipping thing. I am going to start working on the sitting on the leash and see what happens with that. We started a training class on Tuesday night so last night off and on I continued to work with him on heel and focusing on me for a treat in the yard and actually I felt like he enjoyed it but that was before dark. I am not sure what happened after dark before us but he can not overcome that time. He is a sweet smart boy who seems to think he can rule our house and us with the nipping/biting/mouthing (whatever you call it, it hurts).
Structured walk would be more of you going and the dog following. No stopping to sniff, no laying down, no greeting other people, not letting the dog out in front of you, etc. Its you going from point A to point B and the dog following you right by your side. The purpose is that the dog has no say. You are the leader and the dog must follow.

I liken it to basically a kid in a grocery store. You aren't going to let the kid stop in every aisle and look at all the cookies, and cereal, etc. You tell the kid, follow me, behave and you will be rewarded when we are done.

After the walk you can then allow him to sniff or stop, but this should also be on your terms though. What I did was after the structured part of the walk if I knew he had a spot he liked to sniff or mark, I would stop and he would have to look up to me for the command "ok" to go sniff or mark an area. It was basically teaching him when we are walking he can do nothing but follow me unless I gave a command to do otherwise.
 

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He is 7 ½ months and you have had him for 2 ½ months – he is still very young – still at an age where dogs will act like this. If he were my dog, I would first try to understand why he is acting this way ( I know, easier said than done), maybe you can find out more from the previous owners. Those first five months play a key role in how the dog will mature and develop. I would hold back for the time being on teaching him too many commands without understanding the underlaying problem, if there even is one. A dog trainer needs to be good, he – she needs to recognize how much the dog can handle at one time. A lot can go wrong when training dogs, dog owners will also make mistakes and correcting these later will be very difficult. Reading your note he seems to be getting enough exercise. How do you react when he starts biting and wanting out of the crate? It’s hard, but ignoring completely is sometimes a good recipe. With all the attention you give him and the love you have for him – he is a dog – don’t let him take control – good luck!
 

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Structured walk would be more of you going and the dog following. No stopping to sniff, no laying down, no greeting other people, not letting the dog out in front of you, etc. Its you going from point A to point B and the dog following you right by your side. The purpose is that the dog has no say. You are the leader and the dog must follow.

I liken it to basically a kid in a grocery store. You aren't going to let the kid stop in every aisle and look at all the cookies, and cereal, etc. You tell the kid, follow me, behave and you will be rewarded when we are done.

After the walk you can then allow him to sniff or stop, but this should also be on your terms though. What I did was after the structured part of the walk if I knew he had a spot he liked to sniff or mark, I would stop and he would have to look up to me for the command "ok" to go sniff or mark an area. It was basically teaching him when we are walking he can do nothing but follow me unless I gave a command to do otherwise.
Good points Matt. :)

And now we know, the dog does/can walk well on leash! A lot of "newbies" struggle to get that bit done. So the OP has done well there! But it sounds like they need a bit of "refinement" in what they are doing???

No need for me to reinvent the wheel on this topic. Since "you" already did a thread on "refinement, in the walk bit" "as it were.

https://www.boxerforums.com/training-behavior/204737-focused-heel.html


That thread should help.
 

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Good points Matt. :)

And now we know, the dog does/can walk well on leash! A lot of "newbies" struggle to get that bit done. So the OP has done well there! But it sounds like they need a bit of "refinement" in what they are doing???

No need for me to reinvent the wheel on this topic. Since "you" already did a thread on "refinement, in the walk bit" "as it were.

https://www.boxerforums.com/training-behavior/204737-focused-heel.html


That thread should help.
Yup. seems a pretty simple step from where the OP is at. Be a bit tougher if they had a jumper, puller, dog reactive etc. Like you said, the structured walk is really not about exercise.
 

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I have a 7 1/2 month old boxer puppy that turns crazy come dark. We have only had him for 2 1/2 months and he has come a long ways but he has a long ways to go. The people that had him before us was not able to spend enough time with him and he was crated a lot. We work so he is kept in a crate/wire cage during the day. Most days he is in there around 6 hours. I come home the first thing I do is let him out and go in the yard for throw/fetch/chase with toys and balls and try really hard to wear him down. Once he lays down or goes to the door to get back in to cool off then I go in the house to start dinner. Once my puppy is calm and cooled off I feed him his dinner. Once again he has free to run in and out playing whatever he wants to do. Once it's cooled down to a bearable temperature (live in the south) around 7 or 7:30 we head off for a 2 to 3 mile walk EVERY night. Once we have completed his walk he comes back in and he is calm and tired until around 9 when it's time for us to settle down for bed. My puppy starts biting/nipping doing everything he is not suppose to do chewing on furniture running and grabbing everything he can get his mouth on that does not belong to him. He has a lot of toys laying around for him to chew on. We start taking him back outside for a quick fetch/chase game in the yard to tire him out again and now he is worse. He is now so hyped up you can not even touch him everything then is a challenge and now he is clueless what the word NO means. At this point we start making him go back outside by himself and he sits at the door wanting back in. We wait 2 minutes and we try to let him in again sometimes this can go on for a hour of us making go back outside to calm down and making him wait at the door for up to 15 minutes. Once you have him in the correct state of mind he will come back in the house go get on his bed and he is out for the night. I do not want to make the outside a bad place for him but I am at a lost as to what else to try. I have read and tried everything I could find. The vet recommended the cage/crate we live in a small house and the cage is in the living room and he will not stay in there when he can see us. At times I feel like I have a toddler who is so tired but can not seem to fall asleep if that makes sense almost overstimulated. Help! Please only helpful tips we love this puppy and would never do anything that could be damaging to him. I feel we give him lots of attention and love and all we ask is not to nip. Bedtime is a nightmare at my house.


Normal boxer pup behavior super energetic but as they mature they relax a bit. I would strongly recommend serious training if you want real results and by training NOT referring to the kind you get from Petco we tried that it failed. Look up on YouTube: “Off leash k9 training Houston” they have videos of most breeds including boxers! The nipping, chewing on things(toys with squeakers would fire mine up) learning to control his excitement on command around you, kids and other dogs is a must and all needs to be addressed from a young age in my opinion. Hope this helps!


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Yup. seems a pretty simple step from where the OP is at. Be a bit tougher if they had a jumper, puller, dog reactive etc. Like you said, the structured walk is really not about exercise.
Yep the dog could be a lot worst! :)

I got another uh most likely longish post, thoughts brought up to me by benthe bandit. Try and get back to it tomorrow. The OP has some "pretty typical problems" ie the biting and nipping. That's annoying no doubt but not unexpected. But at 7.5 months ... that crap has to stop ... now! And as was mentioned for those that are not willing/able to do the ...just grab the puppies lower Jaw and hang on while squeezing and say ... "NO!"

Just use a properly timed "Pet Convincer!" It's a "Psst" sound and a blast of air. It's a 3 second fix! And they might have to use it ...only once?? get it right the first time and from that point on "NO" (if commanded) or a "Psst" sound verbalized, will make something ie. "there will be consequences" for "poor Choices Dog!"

Right now the OP saying "NO" does not mean crap to her puppy! He kinds like "Oh yeah, whatcha gonna do???" The PC can freak some dogs out?? But I doubt with this puppy ... that's gonna be much of an issue. :)

And as I oft say ...it's just a Bicycle Air Pump and the OP, may already have one?? Looks like this :

Pet Convincer.com

But enough with some of what's gone wrong, for now. The OP has also gotten some things right. The dog walks well on leash and that is a big step! And no issues of Dog Reactivity or People Issues?? Again that's a big tep.

I have no idea what his "issues" with the Dark are?? But it does not matter, he can get over it.

But this dog/puppy has "Behavioural Issues" and "training" won't solve that??? That sounds kinda strange and vague I would imagine??? But I can personally attest to that being a fact! Training is important but a well behaved dog ... is all about balance. I got more tomorrow. :)
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Remember she has had the dog 2 1/2 months and it is 7 1/2 month old. Also the time our dogs like to test but still are immature. The dog is alone all day and night is when it has interaction for a few hours. It needs those mental activities as well. I really like the pet convincer! Stops unwanted behavior rather quick and its good to carry with you in case other dogs approach you on your walks. Came in handy for me! LOL
 

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I don’t think much of gadgets to train or “convince” pups or young dogs to behave or learn. That could be perceived as training by fear rather than by the voice of the owner. There are quite a few other “tools” on the market to persuade dogs how they should behave, or better said, how to be molded to please the owner. Some dogs are very sensitive, the use of such tools can be devastating. Patience and practice are both essential in training dogs.
 

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Remember she has had the dog 2 1/2 months and it is 7 1/2 month old. Also the time our dogs like to test but still are immature. The dog is alone all day and night is when it has interaction for a few hours. It needs those mental activities as well. I really like the pet convincer! Stops unwanted behavior rather quick and its good to carry with you in case other dogs approach you on your walks. Came in handy for me! LOL
Yup, why I would start with a structured walk and when he acts up at night grab the leash and do "sit on the dog". Two pretty easy techniques that I had success with. Especially the acting up inside the house at night. I did "sit on the dog" in the house for a week and it stopped all inside issues. If he started to act up even a little and he saw me reaching for the leash, he became an angel. lol

It wasn't as crazy as what the OP is saying, but basically testing me. Typical adolescent behavior.

He still goes crazy in the house and plays, but now he realizes its on my terms when I want to play, not his.
 

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From what I understand the biting is the problem, is the biting playful or real biting? I don’t see how a structured walk will help the dog relate to biting, or “sitting on it”? Any form of correction needs to be done immediately.
 

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From what I understand the biting is the problem, is the biting playful or real biting? I don’t see how a structured walk will help the dog relate to biting, or “sitting on it”? Any form of correction needs to be done immediately.
Well we don't know if it playful or not, I'm assuming playful, because if it was aggressive the OP would have probably mentioned it.

Its a combination of everything and teaching the dog you are the leader. As most people walk their dogs everyday its a good start to conditioning the dog.

As for playful biting and running around and acting like a complete adolescent tool, I can only go by my own experience. And "sit on the dog training" worked wonders for inside behavioral issues. After a week there were pretty much no instances of out of control behavior.

And yes if a dog is biting playful or not, a correction needs to be done immediately. If the dog doesn't listen, you better have a back up plan, and I found "sit on the dog" was that back up when he chose to ignore commands.
 

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Well, the leash is now the tool and not you? What do you do when you walk the dog on the leash? Do you pull the leash at home rather than using the command “no”.
A dog has to understand “no” – jumping on people is a “no”, walking to other dogs might be a “no”, biting is a “no”. Using “no” when its needed allows the dog to relate specifically to what is not allowed to do.

Then again, if the leash works for you as a “no” then that’s fine.
 

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Well, the leash is now the tool and not you? What do you do when you walk the dog on the leash? Do you pull the leash at home rather than using the command “no”.
A dog has to understand “no” – jumping on people is a “no”, walking to other dogs might be a “no”, biting is a “no”. Using “no” when its needed allows the dog to relate specifically to what is not allowed to do.

Then again, if the leash works for you as a “no” then that’s fine.
No thats not how it works. Like I said its a combination of different techniques. Its using a command in conjunction with something else.

My dog knows verbal commands, hand signals, and facial expressions, so not really sure where you read I use the leash for no.
 

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I don’t think much of gadgets to train or “convince” pups or young dogs to behave or learn. That could be perceived as training by fear rather than by the voice of the owner. There are quite a few other “tools” on the market to persuade dogs how they should behave, or better said, how to be molded to please the owner. Some dogs are very sensitive, the use of such tools can be devastating. Patience and practice are both essential in training dogs.
The "biting" is an additional issue. And while lot's of folks find puppy biting cute?? At four to five months, it's not so cute anymore??? And the more a dog pratics a behaviour (Good or Bad) the better at it they become! And when the those owners have finally had enough of the crap behaviour, of to the pound you go dog, if the dog get's lucky. Most likely "biting" is an additional reason the puppy got rehomed??? Pups getting rehomed for biting, happens all the time ...it is a "Big Deal."

And sure there are lot's of ways to stop puppy biting. And most likely "save for grap his jaw squeeze and hang on for a few seconds" this pup has seem them all ... and he still bites! The squirt bottle, turn your back and squeal like a pig ... are all time (Fail) favorites! My wife tried those and did the jaw grab thing. Wanna guess who they continued to chomp on for a couple more weeks long after they'd stop that crap with dad?? :)

And if a dog, "won't do something he ought not to be doing because he is afraid?" That's is fine by me and others! The dog is "afraid" because of "Properly Applied Consequences for Inappropriate Behaviour!" Make Better Choices Dog", is how the PC works!

If I don't do "that" ... nothing "bad" happens, that's how dogs "work!" Make a poor choice dog and there will be consequences! And right now as regards this dog's biting, there are no consequences!

Kinda like ..:


Right now ... "no" means nothing! A PC for this crap ... is a 3 second fix! And I seriously doubt ... this dog is a fearful, nervous wreck??? SO the Op can continue to struggle with this issues or you know check Zak George on YouTube for a bunch of crap that won't won't work?? Or you know go with the Pro's!

The PC is recommended, by no less than Jeff Gellman, this guy.:
https://www.solidk9training.com/

And he has trained "Thousands of Dogs!" And he specializes in "dogs with real freaking issues!" Pet Convincer in action here.:

And Sean of the Good Dog, here.:


If it's good enough for them to recommend ... that's good enough for me! People with lot's of experience, don't really have "Puppy Biting Issues??" But transfer what we know to others??? Sometimes is not that useful, if they can't do it??? But the PC ... anyone can use that, and if you say "No or Psst" at the same time ...you've also taught that "No or Psst," means something!

And Lindar also found another use for the PC, and that was a good save! But I'm gonna stick with my "walking Stick" as it's always at hand as it were. :)
 

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