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After reading the Sunday paper ads, I think I figured out the difference between a mixed breed and a hybrid. The mixed breeds are free to good home, the "mixed breed hybrid" are $500 plus. That sure is a shame.
 

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So sad and true. A while back some of us were saying that if shelters put a fancy name on the door, gave the dogs some"rare" hybrid names and charged a fortune the dogs would go flying out the door!!!  Guess it's all in the marketing 8O
 

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(Can hear the can of worms opened) I disagree slightly. Mixed breeds are accidents. Most hybrids are bred for a reason. Many poodle hybrids are bred for their hypo-allergenic traits? Before finding the boxer breed, we almost got a Puggle (pug/beagle). But unlike the poodle mixes, which are bred for a beneficial reason, it seems the Puggle is bred just for looks. Also, it seems like many of these hybrids, need to be 1st gen. If continued to be bred, their characteristics change, so they could never be their "own" breed. Why did we not get a Puggle? Well, we were set, once we read this on a main Puggle site:

Puggles are sweet-tempered, playful, energetic, intelligent, social, and affectionate. A puggle is a great companion. They are also very curious dogs.

Care
Puggles require low grooming maintenance. Daily walks or a nice size area to play is advised. They do need to get their exercise as they have energy.

Shedding
Puggles do shed moderately. Their short hair and smaller size seem to help. It is advised to brush your puggle to remove excess hair.

Barking
Most puggles do bark like any other dog breed. Some are very quiet and don't bark much. Some young puppies bark when they are left alone in their crates.

Howling
Some Puggles do howl on occasion. They can inherit this trait from the beagle. They can do this when they get real excited.
WELL, after going into Puggle forums, we found out that not some, but the majority of the owners have pets that chew excessively, shed like crazy, aren't the friendliest with little kids, and love to howl. Unfortunately, it seems this hybrid inherited not only the cute looks, but all the bad traits of the parents. And obviously health issues are not all known on hybrids, so that scared me. Also, not all of them are cute, lol. So anyways, mixed breed (A.K.A. Mutt) are usually accidents, and hybrids are for a reason. Whether you agree with any of those reasons is another story. Oh, and for those who will yell and scream about keeping things pure, just remember, our Boxers didn't just walk off of Noah's Ark all by itself, along with all the other dogs in the Molosser group. Here is a little back story(and note the inbreeding):

[quote:1hkm7n0s] A Boxer club had been formed in Munich in 1895, and the founders drew up the first Boxer Standard as a guide for their future breeding. Much of this first standard still remains in the Boxer standards of today. As any good dog club should, they held a dog show as soon as possible. A picture of the Boxers in that show still survives. The modern Boxer began in the late-nineteenth century in Germany with Alt's Flora, a brindle bitch imported from France by George Alt of Munich. Flora was bred to a local Boxer whose name was never recorded. A fawn and white male from this litter, Lechner's Box, was then bred back to his mother who produced Alt's Flora II and Alt's Schecken. Schecken, when paired in 1895 with a white bulldog called "Dr Toneissen's Tom" in the records, became the dam of the first Boxer registered in the first stud book in 1904, M
 

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Generally...

A mixed breed is a breeding of 2 animals of the same species (like dogs) but different strains/breeds (like a Boxer and pit bull).

A hybrid is more commonly associated with the breeding of 2 species that are fairly close genetically. Wolf hybrid= wolf x Domestic Dog, Liger= Lion x Tiger, Mule= Donkey x Horse, etc.

A hybrid is sometimes sterile (mule), but a mixed breed rarely, if ever, is.

Mario
 

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I agree with the use of terminology...people will call a dog a mutt if it is an accidental breeding or a stray dog etc but people will try and call something a hybrid when they purposely breed it and want to market it well....id say the reason for most of the hybrids or designer breeds is because they want to get paid...a reason you are correct but not a very good reason..i do understand why people try and breed poodle hybrids and at a stretch i may see some benefit but the rest are purely asthetic, not well thought out or researched and the motive is financial. They are certainly not doing it for the betterment of breeding or the dogs they are sending out there...as you said the research into health problems has not been done and i think in the future we will see these "designer breeds" showing up in shelters when they are a little older, not as cute and health issues start to reveal themselves. So, once again perhaps you are right with regards to terminology and useage of hybrid and mutt but to be honest there is no difference...the mutt got bred for a reason too..because someone wasnt watching their dog or caring for it or because the dog just wanted to....that is a reason as well but like you said it isnt a reason i agree with :)
 

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You never know, some of them may have BETTER health, but it is a shame that it is a dice roll for now. And aesthetic reasons are why "some" of the current "pure"/registered breeds are with us too. As for the poodle ones, I totally understand it, since it would be horrible to have really bad allergies and not be able to have a dog. Besides, why else get one, they have to be some of the ugliest dogs, IMO. But better to be able to love an ugly dog, than no dog :)

I am not so sure about money as the almighty factor. At least not for some hybrids in my area. The Puggles sell for half or less than the pure bred pugs, and about a 1/3 less than the beagles. And both are in good demand in my area.
 

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i dont mean to say that they cost more than purebreds but...many people like the looks of these dogs and will buy them regardless of the price...and two, a lot of people can afford the cheaper dogs. Im not saying people who cant afford the high prices shouldnt have a dog..not at all. but there are plenty of pure breds and mixed dogs in shelters that are affordable and need good homes. So many people have a puppy fixation and dont consider these dogs...(older dogs are not for everyone and some people really want a puppy and to that i say more power to you but many just want the looks of a puppy and dont realize how much work they are...for some people an older dog is a better fit but they dont consider it).

As for them having better health i agree it may be a possibility but if just anyone grabs their family pet who may have mange, prone to cancer, etc...you know they may have some health defect which makes them a fine pet but not so fine a breeding dog...IF they were going to have better health they way to find that out would be to have controlled lines and breeding that you could monitor i would think. In the end i do believe it is for money because people see a market, have an unaltered pet and decide to fill that void with pups not realize the danger they are putting their beloved pet in or the problem in terms of pet overpopulation they are causing. I have no problem with mixed dogs but i see the current trend in designer breeds causing a greater problem in the long run.
 

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My first post was more about the point about the marketing of designer dogs making mutts, (yes, they are mutts even if both parents are registered there are still no recognized breed for them) the desire of people to believe they have something new and rare, and the desire of others to profit from this. The long term genetic health effects are certainly too far off to be determined, however the argument has circulated (unsubstansiated I believe)  for years that "mutts" are healthier than purebreds. I mean NO ONE any offense by my terminology of the word mutt, I've owned mixed breed all my life until the boxer craze hit and I loved them all. However, I was content to call them a collie/shepard cross, a Dobi/Hound mix and a beagle/bassett. If I had been concerned about having a hypoallegenic dog I would have looked for a poodle or cross breed at my local pound. I just think it's ridiculous to have large groups of  people breeding dogs for profit and a "lets see what I can make mentality"
 

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Mixed breeds are accidents. Most hybrids are bred for a reason. Many poodle hybrids are bred for their hypo-allergenic traits?
A very few poodle-mix breeders claim they are breeding the mixes for the "hypoallergenic coat" (which is a whole gimmick in itself, since it's not dog hair to which people are allergic, but dander and saliva - which even hairless dogs have!) - ignoring completely the fact that there are already a large number of established non-shedding breeds like the Poodle (which comes in three sizes to fit any lifestyle ;) ).  

Also, it seems like many of these hybrids, need to be 1st gen. If continued to be bred, their characteristics change, so they could never be their "own" breed.
Correct - and so they remain mixed breeds, whatever fancy label the producers wish to put on them.

You never know, some of them may have BETTER health
Some may, but most of the time the odds are against it.  Dr. Padgett at MSU identified 102 genetic diseases in mixed-breed dogs - more than twice the number found in Poodles.  Considering that most mixed-breed pups are not from tested parents, the odds of problems are greatly increased.

And aesthetic reasons are why "some" of the current "pure"/registered breeds are with us too.
I'm not necessarily disagreeing with this, but honestly I can't think of any established purebreds which were not bred for a specific function....though admittedly for some of the toy breeds that function was companionship. :)

I am not so sure about money as the almighty factor. At least not for some hybrids in my area. The Puggles sell for half or less than the pure bred pugs, and about a 1/3 less than the beagles. And both are in good demand in my area.
It's highly variable; around here, people are paying $1500+ for puggles and labradoodles.
 
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