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Discussion Starter #2
Re: Dog food review?

2. The BLUE Buffalo Co Blue Wilderness  

Description:  Feeding guideline:
A 50lb dog should be fed 2.5 - 3.5 cups

Caloric Data (ME*)
kcal/kg = 3,745 (calculated)
kcal/cup = 586 calories (as fed).

Ingredients:
Deboned Chicken, Chicken Meal, Potato Starch, Turkey Meal, Fish Meal, Tomato Pomace (natural source of Lycopene), Chicken Fat (preserved with Natural Mixed Tocopherols), Natural Chicken Flavor, Oatmeal, Whole Carrots, Whole Sweet Potatoes, Blueberries, Cranberries, Flaxseed (natural source of Omega 6 Fatty Acids), Barley Grass, Dried Parsley, Alfalfa Meal, Kelp Meal, Taurine, L-Carnitine, L-Lysine, Glucosamine Hydrochloride, Yucca Shidigera Extract, Green Tea Extract, Turmeric, Herring Oil (natural source of Omega 3 Fatty Acids), Fructooligosaccharides, Monooligosaccharides, Dried Chicory Root, Black Malted Barley, Oil of Rosemary, Vitamin A Supplement, Vitamin C, Vitamin E Supplement, Vitamin D3 Supplement, Beta Carotene, Calcium Ascorbate (source of Vitamin C), Vitamin B12 Supplement, Niacin (Vitamin B3), Calcium Pantothenate (Vitamin B5), Riboflavin (Vitamin B2), Pyridoxine Hydrochloride (Vitamin B6), Thiamine Hydrochloride (Vitamin B1), Folic Acid, Biotin, Choline Chloride, Calcium Chloride, Zinc Amino Acid Complex (source of Chelated Zinc), Iron Amino Acid Complex (source of Chelated Iron), Copper Amino Acid Complex (source of Chelated Copper), Manganese Amino Acid Complex (source of Chelated Manganese), Potassium Amino Acid Complex (source of Chelated Potassium), Cobalt Proteinate (source of Chelated Cobalt), Potassium Chloride, Sodium Selenite, Salt, Lactobacillus acidophilus, Bacillus subtilis, Bifidobacterium thermophilum, Bifidobacterium longum, Enterococcus faecium.

Guaranteed Analysis:
Crude Protein 42.0% min
Crude Fat 16.0% min
Crude Fiber 3.0% max
Moisture 10.0% max
Calcium 1.0% min
Phosphorus 0.9% min
L-Carnitine* 100 mg/kg min
Omega 3 Fatty Acids* 0.25% min
Omega 6 Fatty Acids* 3.50% min
Beta-Carotene* 5.0 mg/kg min
Glucosamine* 400 mg/kg max

*Not recognized as an essential nutrient by AAFCO Dog Food Nutrient Profiles.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Re: Dog food review?

and 3. Champion Pet Foods Orijen Adult

Recommended By  Average Price  Average Rating  
100% of reviewers  None indicated  None indicated  

Description:  Feeding guideline:
A 50lb active dog should be fed 275-375g / 2
 

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All three brands are excellent choices. A bit high on protein for my taste.  Keep in mind that a lot of dogs can't handle the high protein foods. Maddie definitely needs grains in her food otherwise she has loose stool issues. I have tried the Innova Evo and the Blue with her and she did have loose stools with both foods. The trick is finding a food that your dogs will thrive on and one that they enjoy.  Good luck in your food search!
 

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Whole Dog Journal gives high marks to the EVO and the Champion Pet food which are both also grain-free   I would choose one of those  if it was for my dogs, it is the closest to a natural diet for dogs.  Grain free is a good choice for dogs with allergies and dogs really don't need nor digest grains well.  You need to carefully measure portions as this is a nutrient dense food.

Blue Buffalo had some issues with recalls and they won't disclose some of their sources or where it is made so WDJ doesn't recommend them anymore.

Nano
 

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I agree with Tootsie that they are all great quality foods but they are too high in protein for me as well. Every dog is different and will respond differently to each food. Maybe trying to get some samples of these foods first might help, especially where you have three dogs. Probably easier that way to find one that agrees with all of them before dropping the money on these foods.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I can get samples of all the 6star foods at the new local pet store (mom&pop shop) on monday, but also going to check out other local pet stores tomorrow.
 
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I wouldn't feed Atilla or Ajax any of these foods as they are both still under 18 months and need something with a much lower protein content.
 

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I would also get a five star food because you have younger dogs, all of the 6 star foods contain too much protein for under 18 months.  You want to stay below 26-28%. At least that is what I've read ;)
 

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I've used Blue and we had issues with loose stools...But a good point was raised, as you are feeding to younger dogs, the protein should really be lower I believe
 

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If your pups are under the age of 18 months I would definitely not feed anything with a protein content higher than 28%. You don't want to encourage faster growth with the added protein levels, especially since boxers are fast growers to begin with. That can lead to joint and skeletal issues later in life.
 

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Thanks Lisa..
I was wondering why a food would contain such high protien when my puppy food ( I am feeding her IAM's because she refused Science diet, and Purina Pro-plan..don't know why :roll: ) had 28%, then I switched her to large breed and it had 26%. Great anwser to a constant question I have.
Also, I have been trying to keep her fibers to 3% or less because she become's a poo factory if its higher and I always wondered if food moving through a digestive tract at that pace even gave your dog any nutrients.
 

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AshleysMom..

There have been so many studies on this that show there may be a link with bone problems and the amount of protein in food. Boxers are technically a medium sized breed, however the dog food manufacturers formulate their large breed foods for any dog over 50 pounds. Large breed foods were formulated to encourage slower and more even growth by controlling the amount of fat and protein in their foods. Boxers are fast growing pups, and with fast growth we see more skeletal problems such as hip, knee dysplasia, and HOD, which large breed dogs are more prone to. Granted Great Dane's and the giant breeds are more prone to acquiring these joint issues, but boxers are still a fast growing pup.
Puppy formulas tend to have more protein in them which can promote faster growth in puppies leading to some of these skeletal and joint problems later on. They are formulating the large breed puppy foods with less protein and fat to try and slow down the growth. The difference in some puppy formulas vs. large breed formulas are so slim, I think it's more of a sales gimmick. I just tend to want to stay 28% or less protein, whatever the formula.
I personally still believe that large breed puppy bone problems are primarily genetic and inherited, but given the choices of food available today, I would opt for the best and healthiest choice that I can find. At the very least, it is excellent nutrition and if it does help with the skeletal issues, I would consider that a big + !
 

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This is some very good info. Something that I have been trying to figure out for a while. We are having major issues with food and can't get anything to agree with Harleigh.

Maybe my issue is for another thread entirely. I am at my wits end.
 
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