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These are tips, from a Service Dog team, concerning etiquette in regards to interacting with a Service Dog and it's Handler.
 

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Re: Etiquette for the general public in regards to Service D

OK...Just to be a bit more clear on a few things...

Red=rule
Green=reason for rule

Don't touch the Service Dog, or it's disabled handler, without permission first.
If you touch the handler without permission, this may just be a a tap on the shoulder "way to go" kind of thing, can be perceived by the Service Dog to be an assault on their Handler.  As Service Dogs and their Handlers are very deeply bonded, the dog may instinctly act to protect their Handler. (Service Dogs ARE NOT protection trained.  They are just very protective.)

Speak to the person/Handler first.
It's correct human and canine manners.

Do not aim distracting or rude noises at the dog.
This is against the law (stated clearly in above post) and you also look silly as h*ll, but if you don't mind the handler getting a good chuckle or EXTREMELY irritated at you...go for it!!!

What if the service dog barks, growls, or otherwise forgets its manners?
[color=green:30osjvx2]Find out what happened before taking action. Was the service dog stepped on, poked, asleep and dreaming, performing its job (some alert their owners to oncoming seizures by barking once or twice)? If the dog
 

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Re: Etiquette for the general public in regards to Service D

More tips for interaction with Service Dogs and why they are so great!!!

Remember, a service dog is not a pet.

But it has a far better, more rewarding (unless its a companion dog owned by someone on this forum, then they are likely to lead equally happy lives), and more enjoyable life than any pet dog could ever wish for. It's with the person it loves all day long, it gets to go everywhere it's owner goes, and because it's a working dog it usually gets more excercise and  better food and medical care than most pet dogs do because a disabled person can't afford for their assistant to get sick or unwell! Plus, many of the breeds of dogs used for service work were originally bred to be working dogs, so they are doing what is in their blood.

Liz and Lilly
 
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