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At this time our yard is not fenced. Talos is 11 weeks old and we are getting ready to fence our yard to give him more freedom to run and play. We know that boxers are pretty good jumpers and want to do our best to protect him. We feel like a 6ft high chain link fence will look very institutional. Is a 4ft fence good enough? Obviously we need to train him but we don't want to risk anything until he's learned. How high are your fences? Have you had any issues?
 

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I have three boxers. We have a 4' fence.
Does he bolt when he goes out the door unleashed?
If he knows where home is and is happy and comfortable there, your 4' fence should be plenty. Ours have never tried to jump even with 2' snow on the ground. But Boxers are excellent jumpers so keep watchful.
 

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Our Mac had no problem clearing a 3 ft fence and I believe he would have had no problem clearing a 4ft as well. He had a huge prey drive and would jump into the neighbors yard. We ended up going with a 6ft vinyl fence.
 

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Our yard has 6 ft. stockade fencing on both sides and and across the the front sides of the house. We back up against green space so we are only permitted a 4 ft picket fence. I had never fenced the back portion. I have put up garden fencing about half way along the back now which is removable and about 4 ft. high. I ran out and have been unable to secure the rest so far. Kai is very good though and is only outdoors with us. Its pretty private and we have not had a problem with him stepping out of his "allowed area". We have never allowed him into the green space For safety though we will finish it off. I'm looking at this critterfencing.com
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I have three boxers. We have a 4' fence.
Does he bolt when he goes out the door unleashed?
If he knows where home is and is happy and comfortable there, your 4' fence should be plenty. Ours have never tried to jump even with 2' snow on the ground. But Boxers are excellent jumpers so keep watchful.
Well, we typically don't let him out unleashed because there is to much activity in the neighborhood. One day he followed my husband out the door when he was taking out the trash and he did make his way to the front of the house. We were in a complete panic. Luckily my daughter went out the front door and he came right to her. The concern is because he is so young at this point we don't know what to expect. I think a fence is necessary but how do you know if you'll need a 4ft or a 6ft when he's so young.

The other issue is that one side of the fence would automatically be 4ft because that is what is dividing our yard and the neighbors. We're trying to decide if we put up 6ft to be safe and then if need be talk to the neighbor later if we need to raise their fencing.
 

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A four foot fence ... may stop a puppy ... but it won't stop a dog ... but that's not a surprise, a well conditioned dog can escape a six foot fence ... if they "Chose" to, training and a relation with there owners is what keeps dogs from roaming ... fence or no fence.

I saw a Youtube clip of a Personnel Protection trained APBT ... that dog scaled a 6 feet concrete block fence ... on command ... no problem. On the other hand can a foot fence contain a dog semi well behaved dog??? Sure I've seen that also. A German Shepard along Rocky and my walk.

Behind a four fence he's a barker and he runs to the fence, head and shoulders clearly over it and he barks his heads off! He could easily clear that fence ... (been years of that crap) but he "chooses" not to. I trust him (to remain where he belongs but... "Rocky" does not so we cross the street. :)

You have to start with the basics ... if the puppy is a door bolter ... that's a problem! Puppy or not ... he should not go thru thresholds without permission ... use a leash. And train threshold's it's a puppy so you have to be gentle but he needs to learn ... NO means NO, slight tug sideways if he tries to bolt the door.

Or start working on training sit and then go out the door ... with permission. Lot's of puppy stuff here but I did not see a clip on "threshold training puppies??"

https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL39rA__veYgR4EvJoPQhwRlxZmW5H3IEm

So go with the Big Dawgs and adjust to scale.:

I'm not suggesting a "Prong Collar" on a puppy but that's is the general concept ... the door bolting has to be stopped now or you may not have a "Dog" to train down the road. Welcome aboard. :)
 

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We have garden and picket fencing that is about 5' tall. The fenced area is 1/2 acre for them to run, with a doggie door that is on the screen door. We have Deer in the area, and Coyotes that will actually come near the fence to try to lure our Boxers to chase them! When we were looking for a rescue, the only female Boxer they had could easily jump 6 feet. No size fits all.
 

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Four feet, Six Foot no Foot ( the front yard) for the last one, the command was "On The Lawn." And that's what my dogs did, "make good choices dog" it's about training not training not force they "chose to comply."

But a puppy/dog that door bolts ... is not a good starting point ... back to basics. And for the record as a 15 year old many decades ago ... I taught my "Basenji" to scale a 17 foot chain length fence ... I see no reason why a Boxer that "chose to" ... could not do the same thing???

The door bolting ... is a big deal, that's where it starts, Rules Structure and Limitations. I much prefer having a six foot fence around my back yard but strictly speaking with a properly trained dog it would not be necessary ... even still, I'd have more of an eyes on approach. :)
 

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I think if I were to fence in my yard I would go with a 6ft fence, simply because I think its the safest. It also depends on how the yard will be used will he be unsupervised or always supervised. Kai is quite good I can open the door and he will wait there until we say "free time", that is his release word , When he plays in the backyard we are there with him and he knows to stay in our yard, we have some green space behind us but it isn't used by others so he doesn't have distraction but he knows he is not allowed back there. Would I totally trust him, no..because he is a dog and stuff can happen. Last week we had a incident in our neighborhood. A neighbors boxer bite a leashed dog. He and his small companion got out of their house, the front door didn't lock properly and the owners didn't realize they were gone. The just spent a nice chunk of change putting up a wright iron fence around their backyard (didn't help in this incident). Owner thinks her two went into a pack mentality, I don't know but the boxer put tow big amines into an american bulldog and the owner fell. Anyway its a big issue right now, police were called etc. They wanted to seem the boxer as a dangerous dog. After animal control met him they felt no but if he even gets loose again he will be deemed dangerous. So in my book its always best to take precautions. In all my ears of owning dogs I've never had one escape and hope I never do. Now our neighborhood is in an uproar and those with well behaved dogs or invisible fencing in their front yards are no longer being permitted to have their dogs loose at all, only in a solid fenced area.They are very stick with leash laws here also. Our hoo covenants say $150. fine/our parish $150. so it can cost you $300 for having your dog off leash no matter how well behaved. Because of the incident and certain neighbors they will be enforcing even more. Sorry for ranting on. LOL
 

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Nope it's not a rant, it's a story from the real world. And it points to the fact that there can be consequences for a poorly trained dog. As I am want to say "The best preparation for the unexpected ... is a well trained dog, crap happens!" Dog 101 ... don't go out the front door without permission! You train them to obey and once they understand the command, you "Punish" non compliance. I have a Zero Tolerance, policy for "Door Bolting" behavior ... it's just not gonna happen in my house. :chair:

Moving beyond that ... if a dog has recall, knows Down and Stay ... they can be taught to respect property boundaries. But "Proofing" that could be a high risk venture ... it depends on where you live. I taught "On the Lawn" because, I let my dogs on the front lawn without leashes if we go to the car for an outing ... but what if, I forgot my keys are coffee or whatever and had to dash back inside for a second??? Without training and a fall back command ... most likely they would do whatever???

But plan B ... "On the lawn" worked fine. Especially for "Struddell" who would happily drive or walk off with uh ... anyone except ... "Daddy says On the Lawn." :)

But back on point "Boxers" as "Dangerous Dogs" often strikes me as silly?? Most of the one's I've met have been just as silly and goofy as my girl. Still if you look at some of the top dangerous dogs list ... you will find Boxers among them?? I've only seen one Boxer that was not a dog you want to meet in a dark alley!

Rocky and I stopped to talk, they said ... we have a "Boxer" and I asked to see her. Safely behind there ... short wrought iron fence they brought her out ... straining on leash ... she never made a sound but she was starring at "Rocky like he was raw meat!! I was stunned ... but you know ... dogs of war as it were ... goofy notwithstanding ... that's there lineage. :)

Still .... with no fence ... yeah training or no ... it would be eyes on for me also. A six foot is pretty much standard equipment out West. Most dogs don't go over them, they go out unlatched gates or blown down fences after wind storms.

Although .... as it happens there was a loose Boxer I tried to corral, I managed to herd him back home. Backed him up to the double six foot gate, some how we reversed position and he was in front and my back was to the gate. Don't remember exactly how he did it but that Boxer sailed over my head and cleared the gate and back in the yard??? And then cleared the side fence and into another yard???

So I knocked on that door to tell them there Boxer was back ... they said ... that's not our dog ... he just comes into our yard all the time to play with our dog! :crazyeye:

Ah well ... a rather long way of saying, well trained dogs stay in there yard because, the owners have a solid relationship with there dogs and the those dogs chose to stay where they belong ... not because they have to.
 

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We have a 6ft wood privacy fence. It's actually 5ft with 1 ft of lattice as a topper. That's road side along the front. My back no side fence is no climb horse fencing and it's 5ft tall. I would never put in anything less than 5ft.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
We decided to go with a 6ft vinyl fencing for the back portion of our lawn. This will keep him from seeing and being distracted by anything driving or walking through the alley. We're using 6ft chain link in the portion closest to our house to keep the yard from feeling completely boxed in. It all should be arriving in a few weeks and then the fun of installation begins.
 

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We have a 6' wooden/ privacy fence and if we had anything shorter one of our boxers (Jax) would have been over it to visit our neighbors and their dogs.

Jax can also jump up high enough to see the neighbors over the fence if he wants to. He's never tried to scale it, but will put his front paws on it and box it if he's excited enough about what's on the other side.

I agree that he needs more training on his behavior in the backyard. We have a doggie door so our boys can go in and out as they need to, so they are out there unsupervised at times.

They never try to bolt or run out the garage or front doors when opened.

We would not have a shorter fence having boxers based upon our experience.
 

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We have a 6' wooden/ privacy fence and if we had anything shorter one of our boxers (Jax) would have been over it to visit our neighbors and their dogs.

Jax can also jump up high enough to see the neighbors over the fence if he wants to. He's never tried to scale it, but will put his front paws on it and box it if he's excited enough about what's on the other side.

I agree that he needs more training on his behavior in the backyard. We have a doggie door so our boys can go in and out as they need to, so they are out there unsupervised at times.

They never try to bolt or run out the garage or front doors when opened.

We would not have a shorter fence having boxers based upon our experience.
Just gonna say ... great job on the no bolting thing! Lot's of folks can't get that right! It is a big deal ... I've seen more that a very few horribly sad stories on FB on that issue alone!

I don't like the hopping to see up what's over there thing ...however (the fence) that's getting to close to line. I'd stop it from happening myself still ... that nutty GSD ... with the four foot fence that always barks at us ... I have hysterical myself ... "Rocky" is not amused.

Personally I'd continue on the that sidewalk and just go by that dog but "Rocky" my GSD, off leash, ... says "NO" and he will want to cross the street. So we always cross to avoid them. Kinda amusing ... it's been years, that dog and another at that home, always do that and neither have come over that four foot fence?? I find it amusing, myself but apparently ... "Rocky" not so much. :)
 

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We have doggie doors so they can go outside wherever they want into the 4ft fenced back yard. Whether we are home or gone. When I am home and the garage is open I use 2ft high plastic baby pen which I stretch out across the garage door opening.
Lily has a very high prey drive and protection instinct. Diezel has puncture scars on his lower legs where pit bulls he was incarcerated with bit him. He does not do well with dogs he doesn't know. He's very anxious until he is properly introduced.
We have never had a dog jump over the fence's.
Make your dog feel safe at home. They get happy to come home after a walk. They know where they are safe and tend to follow the rules better.
But you need to give them enough exercise and sense of adventure, the kind a dog naturally does.

All the wild game smells make us think we're wolves.



cooling off.


Sunday funday.
 

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but "Rocky" my GSD, off leash, ... says "NO" and he will want to cross the street. So we always cross to avoid them. :)
That's funny. My Diezel avoids confrontation like that too. He won't walk two houses up the street to my neighbors if he's off leash. He thinks there may be another dog there. Other friends occasionally bring their lab over. He will run back and wait for me in the front yard.
If he's leashed, no problem he feels safe and has a purpose. (to be with me)
 

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That's funny. My Diezel avoids confrontation like that too. He won't walk two houses up the street to my neighbors if he's off leash. He thinks there may be another dog there. Other friends occasionally bring their lab over. He will run back and wait for me in the front yard.
If he's leashed, no problem he feels safe and has a purpose. (to be with me)
Wow three Boxers! That's pretty cool! That's a handsome pack you have there. :)

And yes ... Rocky (Over Size GSD) was the first dog, I ever allowed off in leash in an urban environment. And that came about "because" ... I had serious issues with him ... Five Packs between him and Gunther (American Band Dawg) and after that Human Aggression issues???

He turned out fine but because I had to learn new things to deal with his serious issues ... I ended up spending less time laughing and playing and just have fun. And a lot more time working on Rules Structure and Limitations and struggling to understand ... what's the deal here?? My other guys (all Bully's) were good with a looser structure ... but my first GSD ... not so much.

So with him (Rocky) we walked and walked and walked ... finding people to ignore and at some point the leash came off and I allowed him to lead (on walks) and I would follow. And when he got tired of leading, he would step to the side, I'd take point and he would follow.

That was what we were doing that evening (with short fence dogs.) To be fair ... I'd usually cross the street to avoid those dogs behind there four foot fence, there are two and one is a GSD. And Rocky knows that we cross the street before we get to them ... but that night ... we were on their side of the street.

And he seemed to be content to stay on that side of the street and out in front but he stopped before he got to their fence and stepped to the curb and looked at me to cross the street??

I had heard nothing but ... whatever so across the street we go and then seconds later ... yep he was right they were back there and yep head and shoulders over the fence as always.

Had we continued on that path ... I may or may not have gotten bit?? Because unless I was on the curb edge ... I could have gotten bit??? I don't know they bite but being that close, would have been pushing it.

It was a very rough, start with Rocky but I learned tons with him. My next Boxer will be "allowed" to be off leash and proofed for that. Struddell could have done it, but I have had so much heartbreak with Bully Breeds and Boxers in particular ... I just was not that willing to put her at risk or trust her training.

It also ... was not that helpful, that Struddell took that Goofy thing to the extreme?? Everything was a game to her ... I luv'd her for that but it did cause me to be overly cautious with her safety.

My next ... baby girl (Female Boxer) will be given a bit more freedom and my next GSD or maybe a Malinois??? Pretty sure won't be as much of a butt bruising experience as my first one. Live and learn. :)
 
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