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I have a boxer around 1.5 years old. His name is Reno and he is a fantastic dog. He used to go to work with my wife until one day he started having head tremors. At first we were thinking that he was having seizures but it is only his head. He is fully responsive, will lick me, go get his toys, act normal but his head shakes from side to side. It is one of the strangest things I have seen in a dog. They have calmed down and he hasn't had any episodes until this past week. He is now having them at least once a day, lasting from 15 seconds to minutes long. I am stumped, does anyone have any information or suggestions to help the situation..?
 

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I am of no help really but definitely contact your vet. Good luck... welcome to the forum and please keep us posted on how Reno is doing!
 

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Head tremors are actually very common in boxers. I think they can be caused by a bunch of things, including environmental factors. Your best bet is to get him to the vet and have some tests run. They would be better to help you figure out what is going on with your boy Reno.
 

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I suggest you should contact your vet as soon as possible. - I do not want to alarm you needlessly but please just immediately consult your vet.
Had you given him any medication or anything to eat that wasn't a part of his daily diet before he started getting the tremors? I am terribly afraid of these head tremors that you speak of because my boxer, Rolfe, was ill with the stomach flu, and he was giving an injection by a vet - to which he reacted to really badly. He had these head tremors as a reaction and I read your post and felt that I needed to let you know.
 

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We have taken him to the vets already and the vet assumed it was seizures and wanted to put him on phynobarbitol, without even seeing him in action. They ran blood tests and all came back normal. As far as his diet, he was eating a homemade raw diet until we decided to try to switch to a premium kibble. At this point I am really at a loss. I am thinking of maybe trying to have an herbalist take a look at him, just to see what answers I can get.
 

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I think it could very well be an allergic reaction to something. I did a little bit of looking around online and came across with several topics that addressed this issue.

Came across a list that suggests all the allergies they can be susceptible to:

[i:vf70ijd1]"Below is a list of factors that most commonly trigger seizures. This does not mean your pet will have a seizure each time it comes in contact with one. EACH pet is different and sensitive to certain things. This list does not apply to every pet.

Some of these factors are impossible to avoid, but are listed for your knowledge.

Hair spray - Do not spray when pet is in the same room.
Wool - Wool blankets, wool sofas, etc.
Heartworm pills - A seizure may occur 1 to 1
 

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Sorry to hear about your baby. Rish, your info is wonderful, there is more to be found in a previous post by Zhanna in the health section under odd shaking - partial seizure. Apparently this is a fairly common thing in boxers, before medicating with phenobarbital I'd ask your vet about idiopathic head tremors, or check with another vet. Good luck, let us know  :D
 

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Henry does it too sometimes.

HannaBanana directed me to Google "idiopathic head tremors" and that got me lots of good info.
 

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idiopathic head tremors is what it sounds like to me too, dogs can also have something very similiar to bell's palsy which presents itself as tremors or a slight stroke event.  

I have to agree I would not use the Phenobarb unless you know you are dealing with a seizure.  Even with dogs that I see that we are 98% sure it is a seizure by all accounts of the symptoms.  I still dont start medications for it until a pattern of frequency is developed and this can take anywhere from a few days to a few months to a dog never being placed on the med's because it only happens a few times a year.

I think this is worth checking out a little more, read information on idiopathic head tremors and if you feel that things are still not well, I would suggest a second opinion with a different vet!
 

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Jetta has head tremours, they don't hurt her and it looks like she is shaking her head from side to side.  It scared me the first time, but it doesn't bother her.

This is what I believe Jetta has:

Head Tremors: The condition is usually called "Benign Head Tremors of Dobermans," but can also affect other breeds (especially English Bull Dogs). It is characterized by a rhythmic, side-to-side, up and down, or rolling motion to the head. One interesting thing is that this tremor does NOT appear to be neurologic* in origin, and during an episode, the dog can be distracted out of it (unlike a seizure). The tremors usually occur when the dog is at rest. Tests such as MRIs, CT scans, CSF taps, x-rays, blood work are normal.

Here is a link to a bulldog having a head tremor.  Its at the bottom of this page
http://www.bulldogsworld.com/headtremor.html

Here's another video of the head temors:
http://home.swbell.net/cucoloco/boo10.mov
 

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I've posted this response before, but will do so again in case Renosdad didn't see it.

Among other things that can cause head tremors/seizures are calcium deficiency and adverse reaction to vaccination.

One of the potential adverse reactions to vaccinations is seizures -- has your dog recently been vaccinated?

Combination Vaccines, Multiple Shots--on Page 16 of the 2003 AAHA Guidelines under Immunological Factors Determining Vaccine Safety, it states that: "Although increasing the number of components in a vaccine may be more convenient for the practitioner or owner, the likelihood for adverse effects may increase. Also, interference can occur among the components. Care must be taken not to administer a product containing too many vaccines simultaneously if adverse events are to be avoided and optimal immune responses are sought. "

Significant calcium deficiency can cause seizure-like episodes, have you had a blood test to check calcium and phosphorous levels? High phosphorous foods (meat, eggs, nuts) bind with calcium, as do high oxalate foods (oatmeal) and may deplete your dog's levels to a point where it will cause problems. Poison will also cause seizures.

You might want to do an online search for "canine hypocalcemia" or just "hypocalcemia".   This link http://www.lowchensaustralia.com/breeding/eclampsia.htm will take you to an article on this subject in which it states that the signs of low calcium levels (hyocalcemia) are:  "Muscle tremors, restlessness, panting, incoordination, grand mal seizures and fever as high as 106."  

Further, the above articles thats a one of the possible causes:  Poor Nutrition - "Home brewed" diets usually are at fault. The owner innocently may be adding too much unbalanced meat to the bitch's diet, thinking the extra protein is beneficial. What's really happening is the calcium to phosphorus ratio is out of balance because the amount of useful calcium in the food is actually reduced! The ideal contains a ratio of calcium to phosphorus of 1.2 to 1. (Many organ meats such as liver have a ratio of calcium to phosphorus of 1 to 15!! Liver is great for dogs but if it comprises a large part of the diet, the calcium/phosphorus ratio of the diet will be improper.)

If you have chickens, you should be aware that their droppings are extremely high in phosphorous and can cause a problem if your dog eats too many of them.  If the droppings are charging your dog's blood with phosphorous, it's going to drain him/her of calcium in order to maintain proper pH balance and cause muscle twitching, etc...

Check this link HPA | Phosphorous | FAQs on phosphorous from the Health Protection Agency, especially this quote: "It has been used as a rat and rodent poison.."

Check this site Eclampsia (Puerperal Tetany, Milk Fever, Hypocalcemia) in Dogs  "Eclampsia, also called milk fever or puerperal tetany, is an acute, life-threatening disease caused by low blood calcium levels (hypocalcemia) in dogs ...."

One of our dogs developed severe seizures after the second of his puppy rabies shots -- his head shook so hard we thought his eyes would pop out, it was terrifying.  After this seizure activity triggered by the vaccine, he became prone to them from other triggers. Whenever he ate too many high phosphorous foods (or chicken droppings), he would seize.  Giving him 1/2 a quart of plain organic yogurt would calm his seizures within 15 minutes, when they were food-related.

Personally, I would have a complete blood count done to check for mineral levels if you don't think vaccines or something your dog is eating is causing the seizures. PLUS, I would consult a Homeopathic/Holistic veterinarian for an alternative treatment, you can do an online search for one near you at American Holistic Veterinary Medical Association http://www.holisticvetlist.com/, Academy of Veterinary Homeopathy http://www.theavh.org/referral/index.php.

Kris L. Christine
Founder, Co-Trustee
THE RABIES CHALLENGE FUND

PERMISSION GRANTED TO CROSS-POST THIS MESSAGE.

Duration of Immunity to Canine Vaccines: What We Know and Don't Know, Dr. Ronald Schultz http://www.cedarbayvet.com/duration_of_immunity.htm

World Small Animal Veterinary Medical Association 2007 Vaccine Guidelines http://www.wsava.org/SAC.htmScroll down to Vaccine Guidelines 2007 (PDF)

The 2003 American Animal Hospital Association's Canine Vaccine Guidelines are accessible online at http://www.leerburg.com/special_report.htm .

The 2006 American Animal Hospital Association's Canine Vaccine Guidelines are downloadable in PDF format at http://www.aahanet.org/PublicDocumen...s06Revised.pdf .

Veterinarian, Dr. Robert Rogers,has an excellent presentation on veterinary vaccines at http://www.newvaccinationprotocols.com/
 

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Our boxer had her first 'tremor' last night and it scared us to death.  thanks to all the info we've seen here, we were more at ease. still, she saw the doc today and we'll check bloodwork just in case.  Anyone who has experience with this, is this something a dog will grow out of??
 

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I have noticed our boxer, Celtic, age 14 months, had these a few months ago.  Within the past week our son was playing with Celtic with a laser pointer, he loves to chase it around the room.  Could this perhaps trigger the head tremors?
 

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hey welcome to the forum first off..& love the name im from mass hehe

hmmm you know your question is interesting im curious to see what otheres have to say...it sorta makes sense ...

we love pics here of you have any :D
 

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Thanks for the welcoming!  Haven't heard anything yet from the forum and am waiting on our vet to call back.  Will keey you updated though.
Thanks :p
 

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Welcome to the Forum from Fl. ...I am so sorry to read this, I hope and pray you get the answers you are looking for. Im sorry I cant be of any help but I see others are right on the money with links and info...My prayers go out to you and your baby!
 
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