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Hi,
I am new to this so not sure if I have done this correctly.
Last week we brought a new female boxer puppy. For the first day she was was teething a bit which Is normal I assume but over the week it has got worst, instead of just a little nibble she full on bites my arms and ankles, growls and doesn’t let go, she has started to leave marks and cuts and yesterday she managed to bite through my daughter’s nose (which was not fun to deal with) We have tried saying no but all she does is growl at us and bite us harder, so then we tried getting up and leaving the room without making to much drama but when we do that she bites the sofas so we have to intervene. What should we do before she gets to big to control? Is this behaviour normal for a 9 week old?
 

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This was posted in another post which really is perfect.

136254

You can try redirecting with a chew toy or something similar and a strong "no" when she is about to bite you.
Some people say you should make a sound like you are hurt like "ouch", personally I disagree as a dog with a prey drive this will only excite them, similar to a squeaky toy. I know if you tried that with my guy, he would come at you twice as hard. So to your question "is it normal" I would say yes as it pretty much has happened with any pup I owned regardless of breed.

You can also do mental stimulation with training etc. You just need to keep it short, pretty much no more than 15 minutes per session.

Would also recommend crate training as I would never leave a puppy that young unsupervised.
 

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Using their mouths is normal, its how they learn, explore and play so don't worry at the moment. We have a 12 week old puppy and our arms are just starting to heal from the first few weeks. As the previous poster said, distract and say no. If they bite too much withdraw from playing so they know its bad.

Remember hands are not toys so don't encourage them to bite. I have always refrained from telling off or shouting as puppies only hear a response, which is what they want.
 

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This is normal puppy behavior she is not being aggressive to her this is playing. Puppies use their mouths to explore their world and they put their mouths on everything. Allowing her to jump up in anyone's face and bite is never a good idea don't let your daughter crawl on the floor and play with her and put her face available to the puppy. Puppy approved chew toys are a great idea and kongs can be frozen and given to her to chew on they make puppy approved Nyla bones as well. She will continue to want to chew for awhile crates are good if you need to leave the house but they are for training only not a way of life.
 

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I agree crates a a great method of early training. They are not used as punishment but as a place where puppy/dog can chill, relax and learn to be calm. It will also keep your woodwork, sofas etc safe as well as the puppy. Puppies are alike like toddlers, when they get over tired they melt down, the will bite excessively during this time. We always have a schedule for our pups. first thing upon waking we scoop them up, teach their collar and lead and the to potty place. As soon as they take care of business, we praise and bring them in feed, then a little playtime and back to crate. We repeat this during the day about every hour the first week and usually have 3 meal times. Once we get a feel as to her potty needs we extend the time little by little, both for playtime and potty time. Always take them to the same area to potty. When he bites like that, give her a toy of a rope chews. Kong you can fill with plain greek frozen yogurt and you can mix some of his meal kibble into it. It will give him something to chew while in crate. Never take him out of the crate while he cries and don't give him attention until he quiets. It will take several week but you will get the puppy into a routine. While he is out for playtime you can do some training. Start simple with a sit, and keeps the sessions short, when he gets bite again, and he will, simply leash him take him to his potty spot come in give him a little attention for a short time then put in crate. I do that so that he doesn't associatThere re many good training videos out there. Watch many of them some are harsh orators are positive only. You will find a good match. You can start with Ian Dunbar
Those re two ian dunbar bookson before you get your puppy and after you get your puppy. You may find them helpful.
 

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I agree crates a a great method of early training. They are not used as punishment but as a place where puppy/dog can chill, relax and learn to be calm. It will also keep your woodwork, sofas etc safe as well as the puppy. Puppies are alike like toddlers, when they get over tired they melt down, the will bite excessively during this time. We always have a schedule for our pups. first thing upon waking we scoop them up, teach their collar and lead and the to potty place. As soon as they take care of business, we praise and bring them in feed, then a little playtime and back to crate. We repeat this during the day about every hour the first week and usually have 3 meal times. Once we get a feel as to her potty needs we extend the time little by little, both for playtime and potty time. Always take them to the same area to potty. When he bites like that, give her a toy of a rope chews. Kong you can fill with plain greek frozen yogurt and you can mix some of his meal kibble into it. It will give him something to chew while in crate. Never take him out of the crate while he cries and don't give him attention until he quiets. It will take several week but you will get the puppy into a routine. While he is out for playtime you can do some training. Start simple with a sit, and keeps the sessions short, when he gets bite again, and he will, simply leash him take him to his potty spot come in give him a little attention for a short time then put in crate. I do that so that he doesn't associatThere re many good training videos out there. Watch many of them some are harsh orators are positive only. You will find a good match. You can start with Ian Dunbar
Those re two ian dunbar bookson before you get your puppy and after you get your puppy. You may find them helpful.
Hi,
I am new to this so not sure if I have done this correctly.
Last week we brought a new female boxer puppy. For the first day she was was teething a bit which Is normal I assume but over the week it has got worst, instead of just a little nibble she full on bites my arms and ankles, growls and doesn’t let go, she has started to leave marks and cuts and yesterday she managed to bite through my daughter’s nose (which was not fun to deal with) We have tried saying no but all she does is growl at us and bite us harder, so then we tried getting up and leaving the room without making to much drama but when we do that she bites the sofas so we have to intervene. What should we do before she gets to big to control? Is this behaviour normal for a 9 week old?
Hi libby, i too have a 9 week old boxer pup, shes been with us a week now. When we play i always discourage her from biting with an 'off' noise a bit like a woof! It seems to be working, shes not bit me once the last few days and just goes mental for her chew toys, she seems to love knawing on rope toys. I agree with the other post that says their chewing gets more aggresive when over tired. When Ruby starts getting mental like that i scoop her up with her blankey hold her in tight, get achew toy i her mouth and cuddle her. 10 mins max shes asleep after that 🤣 shes just like a baby sucking a dummy 🤣. I've not had a puppy before and not that much experience of boxers either plus i dont have kids but im thinking of her as a toddler and treating as such
 

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Well, first it is perfectly normal, and for some pups a little bit more so?? It sounds like for "me," it would be great a pup as is! But for you, may be not so much .. as she is right now???

We have raised several puppies and they have turned out to be great dog's! But I have always picked them, I tend to pick the "fireball's," although my Struddell (Avatar) seemed pretty mellow when she picked me?? She climbed into my lap and fell asleep?? Most likely, she was tried from being an A-Hole all day cuz that was not really her?? It was not until a day or two later that she became a little White Land Shark??

Now ,,, I "train," our dog's and my wife gets to the doing "easy playing with them." And we had two way's of dealing with the "Land Shark," phase. My baby girl was the Luv of my life. But I don't play and she quickly found out ... that I was "not," a chew toy??

As a "philosophy," I tend to favor addressing issues indirectly?? IE instead of addressing a behavior I don't want ... I train a behavior I do want. That tends to work with "Dog's," but not so much with puppy's??

I just straight up flat out made "chewing on me??" Unpleasant for her, if she went to chew on my hand's fine then. I'd take a firm grip on her lower jaw give a gentle squeeze and did not let go for a few second's! She did not ... much care for that. But she was pretty quick ... to stop snacking on me. My wife on the hand could not do that?? So she went with the "Redirect," then the "Turn Your Back," the "Then the sequel like a piggy, or you know a "squeak toy??"

Yeah well eventually she stopped, snacking on her ... it took her a while to "stop, snacking on others ... also?? But she stopped doing that crap real quick with me, first!

But if the hand then is to much?? You could use a "Pet Convincer," and combined it, with a firm NO! It look's like this. :

It's just a bicycle air pump so you may already have one??? It delivery's an adverse and delivery's a consequence for "Bad Behavior," on the spot ... dog's get that! :)

And from a "pro," there is this from "Larry Krohn." :
 

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Hi,
I am new to this so not sure if I have done this correctly.
Last week we brought a new female boxer puppy. For the first day she was was teething a bit which Is normal I assume but over the week it has got worst, instead of just a little nibble she full on bites my arms and ankles, growls and doesn’t let go, she has started to leave marks and cuts and yesterday she managed to bite through my daughter’s nose (which was not fun to deal with) We have tried saying no but all she does is growl at us and bite us harder, so then we tried getting up and leaving the room without making to much drama but when we do that she bites the sofas so we have to intervene. What should we do before she gets to big to control? Is this behaviour normal for a 9 week old?
I would disagree that this is normal. I’ve had dogs all my life, including boxers, and I have never had a nine week old puppy growl at me for telling it “no”.
 

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This was posted in another post which really is perfect.

View attachment 136254
You can try redirecting with a chew toy or something similar and a strong "no" when she is about to bite you.
Some people say you should make a sound like you are hurt like "ouch", personally I disagree as a dog with a prey drive this will only excite them, similar to a squeaky toy. I know if you tried that with my guy, he would come at you twice as hard. So to your question "is it normal" I would say yes as it pretty much has happened with any pup I owned regardless of breed.

You can also do mental stimulation with training etc. You just need to keep it short, pretty much no more than 15 minutes per session.

Would also recommend crate training as I would never leave a puppy that young unsupervised.
 

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Try filling a KONG toy with frozen bananas and frozen peanut butter to redirect her (for a bit). Try some short walks outside the house, try a squeaky toy or an empty plastic soda bottle without the top on it (supervised), or a dog ride in the car for running errands. I have found that the best way is just to redirect their excitement and attention to something else when they start to get focused on bad behavior. Boxers have super high energy and it is a challenge for the first 9+ months in my opinion, but well worth it in the long haul. We have had four boxers throughout our 20 years and our fourth is now 6 months old, a "new" memory of the challenges of having a boxer puppy I forgot about. I would not trade the breed for any other dog though, I love them between born and the rainbow anytime! Best dogs ever!
 

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I jokingly call puppies piranhas. This is normal behaviour but it sounds like it is escalating and the puppy is not taking your correcting seriously.
No more couch privileges, no more letting the kids hold the puppy until she learns some manners.

We do a loud clap and firmly say/yell NO BITE. If they come back at us or throw a temper tantrum, they are immediately placed in a time out in a puppy exercise/play pen for 5 min. You will repeat this many many times in a day. We also do not allow couch/bed privileges at that age.

If the time outs and verbal corrections are not working, I will do a firm muzzle grab while firmly saying NO BITE.
 

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This was posted in another post which really is perfect.

View attachment 136254
You can try redirecting with a chew toy or something similar and a strong "no" when she is about to bite you.
Some people say you should make a sound like you are hurt like "ouch", personally I disagree as a dog with a prey drive this will only excite them, similar to a squeaky toy. I know if you tried that with my guy, he would come at you twice as hard. So to your question "is it normal" I would say yes as it pretty much has happened with any pup I owned regardless of breed.

You can also do mental stimulation with training etc. You just need to keep it short, pretty much no more than 15 minutes per session.

Would also recommend crate training as I would never leave a puppy that young unsupervised.
I would disagree that this is normal. I’ve had dogs all my life, including boxers, and I have never had a nine week old puppy growl at me for telling it “no”.
I concur - we've had raised, and bred boxers for over 40 years and have NEVER had scars to show for it!!! Dogs are by nature pack animals, and they expect to be governed by an "alpha bitch". YOU must be that person. Frist of all, avoid or discontinue rough paly, as this teaches a behavior you don't want. Second, establish form but loving dominance. My wife has had to literally "take to the floor" each bitch we've kept - once. It helps that she has a belt in Judo, but anyone can "pin" a puppy. Once you have completely controlled the pup, coupled with calming words and eventual petting, you have planted the idea that YOU are boss. Crate training is ESSENTIAL, and freeze-dried liver treats are indispensable for this. Ours literally fly into their crates whenever we say "bedtime", because they know there's a treat to be had. I'm 75 and move only with a walker, and since I'm home alone during the day I have to let our three boxers out to potty at mid-day, and then get them, back in their crates (or whelping box) for their afternoon nap. Liver treat training makes this a snap.
Dave Smola
Ronin Boxers
 

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This was posted in another post which really is perfect.

View attachment 136254
You can try redirecting with a chew toy or something similar and a strong "no" when she is about to bite you.
Some people say you should make a sound like you are hurt like "ouch", personally I disagree as a dog with a prey drive this will only excite them, similar to a squeaky toy. I know if you tried that with my guy, he would come at you twice as hard. So to your question "is it normal" I would say yes as it pretty much has happened with any pup I owned regardless of breed.

You can also do mental stimulation with training etc. You just need to keep it short, pretty much no more than 15 minutes per session.

Would also recommend crate training as I would never leave a puppy that young unsupervised.
Wow that pic made me laugh so much. Cheered me right up that, sums it all up perfectly
 
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