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Ok, kind of a long story. I have 2 male boxers they are litter mates and just turned one year old. They have attended a basic training class and know basic commands pretty well.

Dozer is very stubborn maybe? I try to play with him he just starts biting and cannot be distracted by a toy and listens to no commands. He constantly bites ny hands, feet, pant legs, and butt when I try to walk away to ignore him. When I try to grab his collar to put him in time out he kind of growl/barks at me. Is he being aggressive or bossy? Well when he starts this his brother bowser starts barking at me and jumping on me. I have tried the "no bite", spraying bitter spray, time outs, and I cannot get him to stop biting. He leaves bruises up and down my arms from biting. Is he just to excited? I also cannot walk in the back yard if he is out there because he will run up behind me and start biting on me. And I try to correct it and he starts the growl/bark. I am just scared he is being aggressive. I do not know what else to do to keep him from the biting he is so good other than when he is excited it's like there is no off switch. Had anybody else had these issues and been able to correct them?? Is this just typical mouthy boxer??

Also when people come over they go insane they do not stop jumping on the person and when they are excited its like they have forgotten all of their commands. I would just really appreciate some advice on how to deal with this and be a good leader for them. Mainly dozer he is the problem child lol. Bowser is so mellow and only takes after his brother when dozer starts his growl/bark when he is in trouble.

Help please!!
 

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He is being a Boxer butt-head! A lot of us have gone through the "psycho" phase with our dogs right around the year-old mark.

Keep on training. Putting him in the crate or in another room and ignoring him will teach him that the behavior is not going to get him any rewards. He probably will grow out of it.

As for the jumping on company - My dog is still doing this at age almost 4! I am still working on training him but mainly I crate him until he calms down and then I have my company sit calmly then let him out.

Others will have more advice but I don't think Dozer is being aggressive at all.
 

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Yeah. My little man is a year and a half. Ad just before he turned one he was a nut job. He's calmed down a bit but he still has his boxer burns. And it's like a switch. He'll go crazy. We put him in his crate calmly just like when we leave just so he calms down. He's not in trouble or anything and we don't yell. Seems to work. But don't worry it seems like just a phase


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Discussion Starter #4
Well thanks for the input. I'll just keep working on him. This afternoon he was really reved up he was just biting at random places on me and would make this awful growling noise. Then bowser would get in on it and they were both lunging and growling. It just makes me nervous because I really hope it's not aggression. I just keep telling myself if they really wanted to hurt me they could
 

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That is not acceptable behaviour at all! I don't care if its the teenage stage or not, under no circumstances should they be marking you or placing their mouths on your body. They are being bullies and need a smack! Do yourself a huge favor and hire a trainer to work with you in your home. You need to be the pack leader and they need to respect you!
 

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That is not acceptable behaviour at all! I don't care if its the teenage stage or not, under no circumstances should they be marking you or placing their mouths on your body. They are being bullies and need a smack! Do yourself a huge favor and hire a trainer to work with you in your home. You need to be the pack leader and they need to respect you!
I agree. Dozer is the pack leader in your house and you need a trainer to help.

"It just makes me nervous because I really hope it's not aggression. I just keep telling myself if they really wanted to hurt me they could."

They aren't thinking about really wanting to hurt you, they can tell you are nervous. That makes you not in charge and they are putting you in your place (to them). Have you ever seen two dogs have a fight to establish dominance. Do you want to be involved in a dog fight with Dozer. If he is leaving bruises on you, he IS hurting you.

Have you ever had those horrible untrained chiwawas chase you and bite your ankles. Now think if that chiwawa weighed 60 pounds and stood almost 2 feet tall.

Of course if he is already doing that in your backyard you don't have to imagine it.

You guys probably just need a professional to step in and help. They would turn around very quickly I bet.
 

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I agree about hiring a trainer. Dukes not really like this anymore. Only barks at us when he doesn't get what he wants lol or when my brother wrestles with him (playing obv). But we're hiring a trainer soon too to completely rid of this behavior. I used to get nervous about that. And it didn't help because duke knew it and hed lunge at me. I hated being home alone with him. I'm only 20 and he was my first dog so I had no experience in disciplining a dog or even a human because I was the youngest. But it'll get better and a trainer is in order!

Just don't be nervous! :)


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LOL-I too have littermates; l agree with the above posts; get a trainer, consistent reinforcements, timeouts (in crate) and above all else patience. When people come to our door usually they are expected and I ask of them to not greet or touch the boys unless they stay in their sit/stay position which is usually a few feet away from the door. It is paying off now they are older but it does take time they are just so excited to have peeps come to visit. YOU are the pack leader and this needs to be reinforced ALL the time. when Dozer tries to bite say "no bite" and take him by the collar and do a sit/stay or crate time depending the situation. Yummy treats help get the focus too. Hang in and be persistant
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Well thank you all so much for the advise. We did basic training but I live in a small town so I hope I can find a trainer that will train in home not just in the store like we went to. I agree that dozer is being pack leader and ive really been trying to work on the energy I project to him, but I do admit I am nervous at times when he starts his nipping. I think a lot of the problem is my husband is home with them all day and does nothing for them it's always me that walks them an plays with them and tries to teach them tricks. so sometimes I feel like any attention when I get home they're like screaming for attention and he's going to get it any way he can. Because for some reason they really don't do that to my husband at all.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Ok so help me understand this situation. My 2 boxers were outside me and my sister walked out on the back porch and they got too excited so I grabbed their collars to hold them back so they would quit jumping on her and Dozer started trying to chew on my hand and flopping on the ground like he's throwing a temper tantrum and then bowser starts barking at me and pouncing on me and every time I try to walk back into the house they both pounce on me and dozer continues to try and nip at me. Is this signs of aggression???? I'm just worried they are being aggressive. Help please
 

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Ok, kind of a long story. I have 2 male boxers they are litter mates and just turned one year old. They have attended a basic training class and know basic commands pretty well.

Dozer is very stubborn maybe? I try to play with him he just starts biting and cannot be distracted by a toy and listens to no commands. He constantly bites ny hands, feet, pant legs, and butt when I try to walk away to ignore him. When I try to grab his collar to put him in time out he kind of growl/barks at me. Is he being aggressive or bossy? Well when he starts this his brother bowser starts barking at me and jumping on me. I have tried the "no bite", spraying bitter spray, time outs, and I cannot get him to stop biting. He leaves bruises up and down my arms from biting. Is he just to excited? I also cannot walk in the back yard if he is out there because he will run up behind me and start biting on me. And I try to correct it and he starts the growl/bark. I am just scared he is being aggressive. I do not know what else to do to keep him from the biting he is so good other than when he is excited it's like there is no off switch. Had anybody else had these issues and been able to correct them?? Is this just typical mouthy boxer??

Also when people come over they go insane they do not stop jumping on the person and when they are excited its like they have forgotten all of their commands. I would just really appreciate some advice on how to deal with this and be a good leader for them. Mainly dozer he is the problem child lol. Bowser is so mellow and only takes after his brother when dozer starts his growl/bark when he is in trouble.

Help please!!
I had the exact same problem with Serena. Read my post from July called 'Territorial Agression, Dominance or Something Else?' One of the forum members recommended NILF training (Nothing In Life Is Free). We decided to give it a try and its working for us. In fact, I posted an update about it a little while ago. Serena is so much better behaved, its almost like night and day. Consistency is key with NILF (or any) training. Google it to read up on it. Good luck!
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I will have to read up some more on it. I am just really hoping they are not being aggressive with me. Did they think yours was acting aggressive??
 

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It does sound like bratty boxer behavior to me. I understand your concern because it can get very out of hand quickly. Just think about how quickly it's progressed to you getting bruised! Some good training is a must but you absolutely have to become the pack leader in your home. I speak from my experiences with Lula. She's a sweetheart but she was running my life. I felt that I had no control over her. I'm not good at being consistent with training so that just makes it worse. My hair dresser was telling me one day that his lab had been out of control (his first big dog, all the others are little lap dogs) and a client recommended Bark Busters. Apparently it's the Australian method of dog training. It involved growling a 'bah' sound at the dog while simultaneously throwing a metal chain on the floor at the dogs feet. I know it sounds nuts but I was at my wits end with her (and frustrated with myself for not being consistent). I stopped off at Home Depot on the way home and had a few pieces of chain cut. $4....what do I have to lose? The first time I tossed the chain and growled 'bah' she clamped her ears to her head and looked at me like I was nuts. I repeated it many times over the next week. Turns out, when she's acting crazy and completely out of control, 'bah' would snap her out of it. Three months later the chain hasn't been thrown in awhile and she listens very good. Every now and then if she seems to forget who's boss I have to carry the chain in my hand when we go outside and just hearing it clink reminds her to look to me for direction. It sounds nuts and certainly hasn't fixed everything but its done wonders.


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I will have to read up some more on it. I am just really hoping they are not being aggressive with me. Did they think yours was acting aggressive??
No, the consensus was she didn't recognize me as a pack leader and was being somewhat of a bully, along with the typical teenage boxer obnoxiousness. Like you, I was worried she was being aggressive because I couldn't step one foot into my backyard without her jumping all over me, biting my heels, growling. The NILF training really seemed to help.
 

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I don't truly believe that either of them are trying to be aggressive necessarily. They're trying to assert themselves as Dozer the pack leader and Bowzer as the next in command and you're the bottom of that....

I would definitely try to find a trainer who will come to the house... Who can help you to learn how to properly teach them... Also the NILF is a great program and helped me with my German Shepherd mix. :)

Good luck!
 

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They are not being aggressive. You are dealing with multiple problems. They are both being bratty pups, and neither recognizes you as being in charge. This is further compounded by the fact that they are littermates. They have zero reason to bond with you or recognize you as leader because they have each other. You need FOCUSED one-on-one training time with each individual dog so that their time with each other is interrupted. You need to focus their NILF training separately as well. If you can't provide that, you need to rehome one of the dogs and focus all your attention on just one of them. Littermates are problematic for even experienced boxer owners. If you can't get them reined in quickly, things will only get worse. It doesn't help that your husband isn't assisting. The training needs to be absolutely consistent.

My recommendation would be rehoming one of them. Unruly littermates require experience and absolute confidence in yourself as leader. Those don't happen overnight, and those pups need it now. The longer it's allowed to continue, the worse it will get and eventually neither will be placeable because of their bad manners.

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Discussion Starter #17
So I tried the chain thing. I had an old chain collar and dozer did not like it at first he started barking at it like crazy and I just sat and ignored him and now when i reach for the chain he starts to chill out. So maybe this will work I am also trying to work on a more confident aura around them. As I could use that in every aspect of my life. And the last 2 days have been pretty good he's had a couple little fits but I was able to get them under more control. Also did some one on one time in the yard today and I think he liked that
 

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They are not being aggressive. You are dealing with multiple problems. They are both being bratty pups, and neither recognizes you as being in charge. This is further compounded by the fact that they are littermates. They have zero reason to bond with you or recognize you as leader because they have each other. You need FOCUSED one-on-one training time with each individual dog so that their time with each other is interrupted. You need to focus their NILF training separately as well. If you can't provide that, you need to rehome one of the dogs and focus all your attention on just one of them. Littermates are problematic for even experienced boxer owners. If you can't get them reined in quickly, things will only get worse. It doesn't help that your husband isn't assisting. The training needs to be absolutely consistent.

My recommendation would be rehoming one of them. Unruly littermates require experience and absolute confidence in yourself as leader. Those don't happen overnight, and those pups need it now. The longer it's allowed to continue, the worse it will get and eventually neither will be placeable because of their bad manners.

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I agree with above ^
I really don't like this thread. Please do yourself a favor and look for a force-free positive reinforcement trainer in your area: https://www.karenpryoracademy.com/find-a-trainer
I notice you live in Arkansas so you may not have any luck finding a trainer nearby but perhaps if you email back in forth between a trainer they will be willing to give you some pointers.

It is soooo important to not give them ANY attention (negative attention is still attention and its better than you ignoring them) when they mouth you. Get up cross your arms and walk away then come back when he's calmed down. I urge you to practice recalling them and grabbing their collars every single day multiple times a day and after you grab the collar give the pup a treat. They need to associate collar grabbing with good things.
When you say that you try to "correct" the mouthing, do you mean by physical reprimands? Because if he is growling and snapping at you for that, it is because he is Scared, physical "corrections", verbal reprimands including "ah ah!" Jar of pennies citronella spray, throwing a chain on the ground, or what have you, WILL likely make your dog more anxious and more likely to be fearful and may lead to aggression. www.clickertraining.com they have a free library full of articles and videos. Wouldn't hurt to check it out right?


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Discussion Starter #19
No certainly cannot hurt to look, I want to make them the best they can be. I live in a small town in Arkansas so finding anything can be hard sometimes. We did a basic training class at a local store here and they did really well with that, they are wonderful in public and wonderful at home, they just dont have an off switch when they are in excited mode, and when i try to correct the situation is when they seem to persist even further. I say correct as in bascially what i have done since he started this is ignore him. It all starts when he wants to play and if you play with him he gets way too rough, he starts the biting at hands, feet, pants, you name it, and then starts pouncing with a nip. So what i would do is get up walk away and go in the bathroom or something, but then he started chasing me when i walk away and nips at my butt or feet, and if im outside with both of them and they both start in on the barking and pouncing i would do the same, but if i stayed outside they would again just pounce on my back or nip from behind. I dont know if they are just that adamant about getting my attention or that they want to play that bad. So i say i grab their collars in the sense that sometimes when its the two of them doing that its a lot to handle and it can be painful and if i try to walk away and they both just swarm me i will grab one of them by the collar and either take one inside and leave the other out to seperate them, or if im in the house i would grab dozers collar to put him in his time out spot. I really try to stay away from the "negative" training because I dont want my dogs to fear me.
 

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I would stop with the chain thing. That's negative training. Dozer "chilling out" when you reach for it is a fear reaction. Of course he doesn't like it, you're scaring him.

We had the same problem with Lillie when she was a puppy. If we turned our backs, she would jump up and bite at us. You can (1) keep them leashed and step on the leash if they start to jump. Do this along with the "sit" command. They should have just enough leash to be in a sitting position, and their butts have to stay planted and they need to calm down before they are released. Or (2) remove them temporarily to where you can walk away and ignore them. Without any other interaction, we would pick Lillie up and deposit her on the stairs on the opposite side of a baby gate then walk away. She could see us, but she couldn't get to us and we'd ignore her 'til she calmed down. There were days I was putting her on the other side of the gate every five minutes and it was exhausting, but they eventually figure it out. Having littermates, though, you have to have two time-out zones. Putting them in time-out together gives them each other to play with. That won't solve anything.
 
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