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Discussion Starter #1
Daisy is one and a half now. She's only a small boxer weighing only 20 kg, but she is all muscle and is really really strong! She will pull and pull on the lead. When the lead's on the collar she will pull so much that she makes herself sick. I've tried every sort of headcollar but have yet to find one that does not ride up into her eyes or rub her face untill it's red raw. I'm currently walking her on a halti harness but it is not a very good fit at all. Because she is fairly small but deep chested it fits around her belly but is too big around her chest.
Does anyone have any ideas as to what I can try next? I really need some suggestions!

Thanks

Heather
 

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With Scout (9 mos), our trainer told us to stop walking until he got the hint not to pull but that never worked.  She then instructed us to get one of those spikey collars (spikes pointing in).  I was afraid that it would hurt him but she said he would only pull a few times before he understood.  She was correct.  Now he knows we mean business when he gets his collar put on and he does not pull at all.  I thought at first they were inhumane but she assured me they do not hurt them.  Our Gunner (3 mos) is just now starting to pull on his leash and he will be handed down Scout's first collar.
 

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I have a pinch collar for rocky, it is fantastic!!! He walks sooo good! My moms boxer (the real jerk, tyson) is horrible but with the pinch collar he walks great, it also takes a lot of patience and a stern voice...
Also, i suggest buying "The Dog Whisperer"... Cesar Millan is awesome, youll def. learn a lot
Here's a link:
http://dogpsychologycenter.com/

Pinch Collar:
http://www.cobankopegi.com/prong.html

I gotta tell you, if anyone uses a choke collar, to switch, there choke is more dangerous, a dog can choke himself/herself to to death! The pinch is not known for harming a dog, just simply teaches them...

Good Luck!!
 

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I'm another advocate for the pinch collar. Eddie would really hurt himself because he pulled so hard. We tried the pinch collar and had instant results. We also learned to walk him by our side, never letting him lead ahead.
 

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Hi Heather,
Although I would have to agree with the others - that I prefer to use a prong (pinch) collar, you'll likely not be able to, as I believe that they're illegal in the UK. (Which is, incidentally, too bad, as they are a very effective and humane training tool when used correctly.) Unfortunately, I've had the same exact results that you've had with the head halters, as well as the underarm "no pull" harnesses. The head halters also made training a miserable experience for my bitch - she wanted nothing more than to get the thing off her head (wouldn't focus on me, wasn't enjoying training, didn't want the treat rewards, etc). I finally took it off of her, put the prong collar back on and she was a happy worker again! :)

Pulling on the lead is one of the hardest things to train away from, especially if they've been allowed to do it for any extended period of time. Likewise, especially dominant or social dogs can be nearly impossible to train away from this. I have a bitch currently living in my home who has earned her CGC certificate as well as two legs toward her AKC CD title in Obedience, and she still pulls on the lead when she gets it into her mind that she wants to meet someone. The only correct answer for her has been lots, and lots, and lots, and lots of Obedience training both in and out of a formal class environment along with a prong collar.

My best recommendation to you would be to get her into a formal obedience class and learn about the "luring method" of teaching heeling, as well as what's called "Attention", or a command called "Watch Me". This will likely help your situation immensely, but it's just so hard to teach training on a message forum.

Good luck!
 

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When I lived in Ireland, my local pet store ordered me Haltis that fit a boxer perfectly & that was the only thing that kept my 2 from choking themselves to death. I never had any problems with any raw areas or anything else..Just a thought.
 

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I really think that the "stop when ever they pull" can work as well.  Chloe has a modified choke - nylon about 5/8" wide.  It has a safety on it - so that she cannot pull it to the point of completely closing off her airway  I place it high on her neck and fit it when we walk so that it will pressure the neck when she pulls - when it is up high on the neck - they cannot get the strength that they can if it is at the base of the neck.

We have been training Chloe for 30 minutes twice a day on the leash for the last 10 weeks.  She is a lot better than before - my arm doesn't hurt - I just stop walking and make her sit next to me eveytime we stop - when her butt is on the ground I start again.  Yes it is a pain - but it is worth it in the end.

Also don't let you dog walk in front of you - they should walk beside or behind you - the human should be the leader.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thanx everyone for your suggestions! I'm gonna have a go of the stop and sit method when ever she pulls on a walk and see if we get anywhere with that!
I have to admit, I've never seen one of those pinch collars before, and I will be really honest with you, my first reaction was that they look rather brutal! It seems that a lot of you have had great success with these collars though.

Thanx again and if there's anymore suggestions from anyone I'd love to hear them!  :D
 

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My male boxer is now 18 months and 32kg and I had the same problem. At puppy school is was fine but when walking down the beach or out in the streets he would pull so much. They are so strong arn't they!!! I know where you are coming from.

The simple solution is a Hilti - But the one that goes over his nose. It doesn't hurt them or affect there movement in anyway but it gives me total control over him. I'm in Australia but I'm sure you could buy them overseas. My vet recommended it and it has worked a treat. Your puppy will hate it at first but give it few goes and they get use to it :)

Let me know if you want more info on it and I can take  a pic of it for you

Cheers

:)
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I would definitely be interested in seeing a pic and getting some more info. I've just gone and bought yet another "easy walk" harness off the net. Another waste of money! It certainly doesn't work. It does actually fit her but when she pulls it just goes all out of line, digs into her leg then she lifts her leg out of it!
 

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Here's a website that sells them & you can see a real good picture also. Ask your local pet store if they can order one for you. There are different sizes & I cannot remember what size I got. You need one that will accomodate a boxers wide nose. Hope this is some help.

www.smartpakcanine.com
 

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Even with the easy-walk harnesses and the Halti's it still comes down to training.  I would also use the stop and sit method with those as well.  Chloe is now on nearly 14 weeks of the method and only pulls on the last block back to the house - so that always takes 10-15 minutes.  But no more pulling any other time.  Consistancy and persistance is the key - it's not fast, but it is easy :)
 

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I am totally against the prong collar, it is just plain abuse.  I agree with the people using the stop/wait then walk methods or switching directions.  Working with a good obedience trainer on it is very helpful also.  A dog can only pull when someone pulls against him.  Loose leash and use squeeky toys, treats and praise to get him to stay by you.  It takes a little more work but is way worth it in the end.  I have had Boxers for 25 years so I have been around all the fads (shock collars, prongs)  I assure you that a little perserverance pays off dividends in your relationship with your dog.  I highly recommend the book "If A Dogs Prayers Were Answered Bones Would Rain From The Sky" by Suzanne Clothier.  She has put together a beautiful book on strengthening your relationship with your dog.
 

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I find it interesting that those who are so vehimently against prong collars and those who refer to them as "abusive" usually are those who have no experience with them. Being around them is not the same as using them, and using them correctly.

I have used them all - prongs, haltis, sporn harnesses, slip chains, etc. ANY training collar needs to be used correctly under the guidance of a qualified trainer. ALL collars can be abusive if used incorrectly. . .

Ever seen an uneducated individual try to "check" a dog on a halti? NOT good.
 

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I do the stop and wait but you should also choke up on the lease and keep him close. If the lease is tight than hes walking to fast, give him a tug tell him to slow down. This is working well for me. But we are still working on the excitement with strangers and other dogs. GL
 

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It seems that Cesar Millan's ("The Dog Whisperer") technique seems to be a good one.  He uses one of those leashes that you make a loop for the collar.  He places it up high on the neck (just behind the ears).  This keeps the dog from having the strength to pull because they can't get there head down.  Harnesses don't really work because it gives them the ability to use their strength to pull.  Also, as ssimmons99 mentioned, you need to train the dog to walk beside you or behind you and not in front of you.
 

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[quote="mom2scout&gunner\";p=\"932":1543ktzf]With Scout (9 mos), our trainer told us to stop walking until he got the hint not to pull but that never worked.
 

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i agree with daiseysmom as my rossi boy pulls like hell !!! everything is a game to him!!! although its good if you are ever walking uphill...haha....but its a nightmare,i tend to walk with him to heal..i hold the lead in my left hand and feed it across the front of me into my right hand and keep it tight to my thigh so he is then walking close to me,i then ease off when he pulls less,and im always telling him that he is a good boy and say"gently..gently" which he is now seeming to respond to very well.dont forget that your boxers although completly mad, still want to please you!! michelle x x
 

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If you actually pay close attention, Cesar Millian does use the leash, but he's basically using the same thing any trainer or breeder uses for teaching their dogs to show, and it uses the same location on the dogs neck (right behind the ears high on the neck) and you see a leash on a show dog.

He has also developed his own collar based on this principal of keeping the leash right behind the ears...
http://cesarmillan.securesites.net/index.php?cPath=76

Read the info and see what you think. Also, every time before you go for a walk, play with your dog. What ever it takes to get him to run...or take him to a dog park or something similar. If you wear him out and get him tired, he'll be easier to train that a fully energized dog.
 

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I don't have sound on my computer here - what's the purpose of the neck-harness-looking-contraption?  From the video, it doesn't look as if you use it at all - is it just supposed to keep the collar from sliding down from behind the ears?
 
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