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We got Bobby even he was a puppy he's now 2 years old, we did everything we were told train him, walks (although he's seems 10x worse after a walk?) and just showed him general love and attention, but no he throws everything back at our face every day. He never stops jumping up at us or table counters, when ever my 13 year old son comes down he constantly feels the need to jump up, bite, bark and be a pest non stop. We tried everything trainers suggested but it simply doesn't work everything turns into a fight with him (literally). I genuinely feel like I hate him obviously I love him however it just feels like it's outweighed...
 

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Ok first ... take a deep breath and relax. If this has going on for two years?? And you were working with a trainer??? Then more than likely it was a "Gentle Paws" treats and cookies trainer?? Your dogs has no rules and limitations and most likely very little in the way of structure at home. He does not understand "No" and does not make "Good Choices" hence the "bad behaviour."

You say walking him is a chore??? What does he do and what do you use to walk him with???
 

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Ok first ... take a deep breath and relax. If this has going on for two years?? And you were working with a trainer??? Then more than likely it was a "Gentle Paws" treats and cookies trainer?? Your dogs has no rules and limitations and most likely very little in the way of structure at home. He does not understand "No" and does not make "Good Choices" hence the "bad behaviour."

You say walking him is a chore??? What does he do and what do you use to walk him with???
 

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Boxers are not for everyone. I made lots of mistakes with my first Boxer, and he was a bit of a terror his first couple years. I was raising teenagers, and didn't have any cooperation trying to implement various behavior modifications. He ate some very valuable wood carvings, and was so wild we didn't have lots of company. I was in this relationship for life, and he did end up to be the closest friend I will ever have in my life. If you have a trainer, familiar with Boxer behavior, tell you that this dog is hopeless, you need to find a Boxer shelter to rehome him. If the trainer tells you the dog just needs a ton of work, but you can't see committing to it, find a Boxer shelter to rehome him.

I'm not judging here, but at two he might have a great life being rehomed to a family used to challenging Boxer behavior. He might even find a Boxer sibling. It's hard to let them go, but often it's best for the dog in the long run.
 

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Two years of this crap is a long time but ... still crap advise gets crap results?? I still want to know about the walks "becasue" apparently??? Getting that part alone right can solve 90 percent of the issues??? Structured walks are important. :)
 

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I also have a difficult time with my boy. He will be 2 in September and is constantly chewing on toys and furniture, even with his own pile of toys and bones. He tears through the garbage can, and snatches food off of the table. Is it still possible for him to be properly trained, or is it too late for him?
 

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Also new to Boxer ownership, but not new to dogs. Couple things I found that work good with my pup(just turned a year old) are using a leash to correct him in the house when he is not listening to commands off leash. I never took anything away from him. Meaning if he started to chew on a sneaker, I would take it out of his mouth, put it back on the floor where it was and say no whenever he tried to go near it till he just got bored and laid down. Did the same with food. He hasn't chewed on anything that is not his since he was probably 6 months. Also trained him to go to his bed whenever anyone has food out or is sitting down eating.

He still has his moments, but if you don't get frustrated and are consistent, I've found they are not very difficult to train. Except the jumping, he is much better then when he was a pup but still a work in progress.
 

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I also have a difficult time with my boy. He will be 2 in September and is constantly chewing on toys and furniture, even with his own pile of toys and bones. He tears through the garbage can, and snatches food off of the table. Is it still possible for him to be properly trained, or is it too late for him?
Are you crate training?
 

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I see that walking is a chore, have you tried walking with a harness? Mine walks great with the harness and he does not "pull" with it. I think it is much more comfortable for him as well.
 

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I also have a difficult time with my boy. He will be 2 in September and is constantly chewing on toys and furniture, even with his own pile of toys and bones. He tears through the garbage can, and snatches food off of the table. Is it still possible for him to be properly trained, or is it too late for him?
Well ... if I said NO ... there would not be much point to having a forum??? :devil:

So the answer is yes ... even at two years old he can still be retooled. But if he is counter surfacing and getting into the trash can?? That crap has to be stopped first! He is only one misadventure away from a trip to the ER.

That crap has to stop ... or you might not have a dog to train?? High Level E Collar Correction, a Bonker a tooel bound with rubber bands and you throw it at the dog and hit them, a leash and tether to prevent the dog from doing the behaviour ... and work on training and the behaviour could self extinguish??

I can explain those options in more detail ... later but for right now ... have a look here. :
http://www.boxerforums.com/general-boxer-forum/198785-working-home-puppy-how.html

And post 15 ... is advise I always give, the trash cans and the counter surfing ... makes your situation slightly more critical. At any rate ask questions either here or there or start your own thread. Welcome aboard. :)
 

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Bobby outside of the house, while with other people or when we have visitors is an angel honestly he brilliantly behahaved dog, however it's normal day to day circumstances where he's a pain. As you were saying boxers are seemingly easy to train but I just can't seem to stop him constantly fighting and jumping up (not aggressively but just consistently feels the need to bark and mouth us). Admittedly we are not very structured regarding his walks which I take responsibility for but it just seem he doesn't know what 'no' means and I don't know anymore how to discipline him. Thanks for the replies I do love him he is just very stressful.
 

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Bobby outside of the house, while with other people or when we have visitors is an angel honestly he brilliantly behahaved dog, however it's normal day to day circumstances where he's a pain.
If he is actually good with people in the home ... vistors??? Then you got something right! Company in the home ... as good as my Struddell was ... she was kinda sorta a "PIA" with company, barely controlled chaos! The "Place Command" would have been the idea solution but I did not know of it. I could make her "go to bed" ... but she would wiggle, whine and plea at guest with her eyes and now ... I'm the bad guy??? So it was always .... "Release the hounds" as it were and Chaos would ensue. Sigh ... male guest luv'd it, women ... not so much, so she ignored females in the home. So if your dog is ... civilized with company in the home ... you got that right. :)


As you were saying boxers are seemingly easy to train
No ... some people can say that. I suppose ... I could also??? But I don't ... I don't recommend GSD's to anyone ... and I am reluctant to recommend "Boxer's" to most people ... becasue they can be a "Hair Pulling, and patience trying experiance ... for most people.

I find Boxers easy to train myself ... although in rescue ... I've only had the opportunity to work with Males ... females are different and other than my Struddell I have not had the opportunity to work with another female Boxer.
:(

But .... I don't recommend GSD's to anyone I know and I am reluctant to recommend Boxers to most people becasue ... as you have found out ... they can be a pretty hair pulling experiance ... butt loads of patience required.

And I can't cite the source so I must have read it in a book ... but many many years ago. I read that a "Pro Trainer" of K9's once said he can train 3 GSD's in the same amount of time it takes him to train ... One Boxer. :)

If you look at any top 10 doggy IQ list ... you won't find Boxer's anywhere near the top ten ... Mal's either by the way?? The further down that list you go ... the more it means you have to have your act together to get those dogs to care ... about what you want to do. Biddability, how many times do I need to repeat a command before the dog get's it???

And learning from experiance ... with dog number three "GSD" ... a dog being in the top ten is not necessarily a good thing?? Labs and Goldens ... if you want an easy dog ... there you go. All the other top ten dog's ... youbest have your crap together. Long way of saying ... it's not just you. :)

but I just can't seem to stop him constantly fighting and jumping up (not aggressively but just consistently feels the need to bark and mouth us). Admittedly we are not very structured regarding his walks which I take responsibility for but it just seem he doesn't know what 'no' means and I don't know anymore how to discipline him. Thanks for the replies I do love him he is just very stressful.
If that is response to your thread's title ... no sweat ... crap happens and your frustrated, been there done that ... my first Wl GSD experiance ... was not good! Rocky is number three on the doggy IQ scale ... so much for being easier to train?? Specifically ... no mention of "Human Agression there?? Which is not a "Bully" thing ... it was a surprise to me???

At anyrate being frustrated ... is not a crime and stopping and thinking is the first step to getting your issues with your dog solved. :)
 

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I don't use my boxer's crate as punishment, but I do put her in there for a "calm down" every now and then. Only for a few minutes and I don't use harsh words or a stern voice, it's literally if she's jumping up on people (she doesn't tend to jump up on me), I just put her in to calm her down and then let her out a few minutes later. It seems to help. When I take her back out of the crate I take her out on-leash and re-introduce her to the people in the house while on-leash. Then let her off when she's calmed down. She just gets excited initially (especially if people show up at different times, she gets excited all over again) and then generally calms down after a few mins.

I think she views me as the alpha because when she's jumping on my husband and won't leave him alone I tell her to "no, go lay down" and she stops, whereas he can say no all he wants and she won't pay attention. I've also literally tackled her to the ground and laid on top of her (not my full weight obviosuly, but enough so she knows she can't go anywhere) when she's not listening to me or talking back so she knows that I'm the boss. I also hand-fed her for the first month or so when we got her so she knows that I control her food.
 

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Just want to add - my boxer is my first dog ever so I am by NO MEANS an expert, I just read a lot before getting her and found some of the techniques that work with my girl. She's still a puppy and most definitely still has bad behaviour that needs correcting. Just wanted to clarify!
 

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I don't use my boxer's crate as punishment, but I do put her in there for a "calm down" every now and then. Only for a few minutes and I don't use harsh words or a stern voice, it's literally if she's jumping up on people (she doesn't tend to jump up on me), I just put her in to calm her down and then let her out a few minutes later. It seems to help. When I take her back out of the crate I take her out on-leash and re-introduce her to the people in the house while on-leash. Then let her off when she's calmed down. She just gets excited initially (especially if people show up at different times, she gets excited all over again) and then generally calms down after a few mins.
LOL ... yessss, if you view my thread:
http://www.boxerforums.com/training/183298-fearful-anxious-flat-crazy-place-command.html

The situation you describe is exactly why I put that info together. Training Place and doing Sit on the Dog ... trains "calmness" into a dog. The situation you describe ... is precisely why ... "Boxers" would not be considered an easy dog. You describe ... is pretty much par for the course in fact. :)

And the jumps on others but not on you ... yep same deal here. I used the "knee" thing and "Struddell" did not jump on me, actually no dogs jump on me more than once! But for awhile everyone else was fair game. The knee thing worked for me ... but apparently it is not an easily transferable skill. OK ... I won't jump on dad ... but everyone is ... raw meat!

There are things you can do to stop that but that's another topic. But start to work on "training calmness" and go on "structured walks" ie no sniffing, no screwing around just walk, do "Sit on the Dog" and return home. A week or two of that alone and you should see a marked improvement in her in home behaviour. :)
 

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Just want to add - my boxer is my first dog ever so I am by NO MEANS an expert, I just read a lot before getting her and found some of the techniques that work with my girl. She's still a puppy and most definitely still has bad behaviour that needs correcting. Just wanted to clarify!
No need to defend her ... as I say ... par for the course! :cheers:
 

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I found the following advice useful as I was a first time boxer owner, these mostly came from Chip and another experienced boxer owner I know: Perhaps you have already tried these but just sharing the advice I received that actually worked:

Dogs don't get over bad behavior they just get better at it. So never tolerate bad behavior, always let the dog know its not acceptable. Be persistent and consistent.

How to correct: a tomato ketchup bottle filled with water, quick-draw-McGraw straight at the face when the dog is counter surfing or jumping up, this should be accompanyied with a very distinct loud and long "no". Unfortunately the person/child/other dog that the dog is jumping up to sometimes gets wet.

Spray items that he is likely to chew with the anti-dog-chew spray that is available.

Make sure he knows who's the boss, dont let him go through a door before you, or sit on the settee until you say ok. If he's on the settee get him off, make him sit, then let him up. Other ways are making them walk behind you, (which is tough but there are ways), using the "sit on the dog" technique that you can find in this forum, and generally being calm, consistent and clear.

Another thing you can do is establish a communication system, "yes" means good and they get a treat, "no" means bad and they could get squirted with water.

All this helped for me and I have a very stubborn female boxer who would absolutely rule the roost if I let her. You know its easier to let a dog/child do what they want but if you want to "form" them you need to work hard on rule enforcement.

I hope this helps, its going to be tough and you have to be consistent, calm and persistent and - always.

good luck - check back in and let us know how its going.
 

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Dogs don't get over bad behavior they just get better at it.
OMG ... I luv that line!! That kinda sounds like me in my old always on the rampage mode I think?? Glad I wasn't taking a drink ... I'd have choked. :)

How to correct: a tomato ketchup bottle filled with water, quick-draw-McGraw straight at the face when the dog is counter surfing or jumping up, this should be accompanied with a very distinct loud and long "no". Unfortunately the person/child/other dog that the dog is jumping up to sometimes gets wet.

Spray items that he is likely to chew with the anti-dog-chew spray that is available.

Make sure he knows who's the boss, dont let him go through a door before you, or sit on the settee until you say ok. If he's on the settee get him off, make him sit, then let him up. Other ways are making them walk behind you, (which is tough but there are ways), using the "sit on the dog" technique that you can find in this forum, and generally being calm, consistent and clear.

Another thing you can do is establish a communication system, "yes" means good and they get a treat, "no" means bad and they could get squirted with water.
I can't/won't say a squirt bottle can't work and i have seen it used with biting puppies. But not my style. And ... if I had a counter surfing situation ... I'm going to go "Bonker" city on that dog! That crap has stop now ... end of story. :)

All this helped for me and I have a very stubborn female boxer who would absolutely rule the roost if I let her. You know its easier to let a dog/child do what they want but if you want to "form" them you need to work hard on rule enforcement.

I hope this helps, its going to be tough and you have to be consistent, calm and persistent and - always.

good luck - check back in and let us know how its going.
LOL ... the dreaded ... "Female Boxer!" I remember way back in the day ... I wanted a boy but they were all gone. So I was like Boy/Girl ... what's the difference??

LOL ... I quickly found out, in a nutshell ... the girls are less interested in what makes you happy and are much more interested in what makes them happy. :)

In rescue work thus far I always seem to get male Boxers. And I find them a delight and piece of cake to work with. But my next Boxer will be another girl ... I find the girls to be more of a "Mr Toads Wild Ride" experiance ... and thanks for the feedback. :clap2:
 

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Also we use a harness and he's brilliant on walks although he doesn't seem to like them as much as normal dogs?..
Yeah I saw one GSD on a Gentle Leader ... and I stopped and spoke to the owner from across the street.

Rocky was behind me, off leash following me and when I stop Rocky stopped. His dog was on the GL and when he stopped his GSD stopped also.

Frankly ... I've always felt embarrassed for dogs out in public, with those things on there face. I tend to think it's embarrassing for the dog (yes projection but whatever.) That's how I feel but ... in the situation above ... I saw it.

My Rocky held his head high and proud while we stopped. The Gentle Leader dog ... hung his head low and stared at the ground. We spoke for about five minutes and his dog never looked up??? His dog didn't pull on the leash and that was all he cared about. He either does not see the "beat down look" or doesn't care???

Engineering notwithstanding ... a harness is designed for a dog to pull. Trainers that can successfully rehab difficult dogs do not use "harnesses." The leash is how you communicate with a dog and give them direction, guidance and corrections as required. Corrections which under ideal circumstances would consistent of a slight tug sideways. You can't ... correct a dog with a "harness" nor can you give them guidance??

I would never trust a "Harness Trained" dog to do anything reliably under pressure?? And in the "Real World" a dogs failure to do as commanded ... can have "consequences."... not that I have an opinion one way or the other. :devil:
 
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