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Discussion Starter #1
Kina will be 6 months old in about 1-1/2 weeks. She has been dry humping K.O. like crazy lately. (K.O. ignores her or gets irritated)

Is this a sign that she is going to come in season soon? (Probably) Do I need to get the spay scheduled now? (Yes)
 

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That's about the time I had Zoe spayed, her intermediate training class was coming up when she turned 6 months and I didn't want to risk her coming in during it.
 

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Humping is a sign of dominance
When to spay is your decision, just wanted to give you some info to review to help you make an educated decision:


On the positive side, spaying female dogs

if done before 2.5 years of age, greatly reduces the risk of mammary tumors, the most common malignant tumors in female dogs
nearly eliminates the risk of pyometra, which otherwise would affect about 23% of intact female dogs; pyometra kills about 1% of intact female dogs
reduces the risk of perianal fistulas
removes the very small risk (.0.5% ) from uterine, cervical, and ovarian tumors
On the negative side, spaying female dogs

if done before 1 year of age, significantly increases the risk of osteosarcoma (bone cancer); this is a common cancer in larger breeds with a poor prognosis
increases the risk of splenic hemangiosarcoma by a factor of 2.2 and cardiac hemangiosarcoma by a factor of >5; this is a common cancer and major cause of death in some breeds
triples the risk of hypothyroidism
increases the risk of obesity by a factor of 1.6-2, a common health problem in dogs with many associated health problems
causes urinary "spay incontinence" in 4-20% of female dogs
increases the risk of persistent or recurring urinary tract infections by a factor of 3-4
increases the risk of recessed vulva, vaginal dermatitis, and vaginitis, especially for female dogs spayed before puberty
doubles the small risk (<1% ) of urinary tract tumors
increases the risk of orthopedic disorders
increases the risk of adverse reactions to vaccinations
 

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I agree with Gypsiemouse. Humping is a sign of dominance. Nip it in the bud before it gets out of hand. She's trying to gain control of the pack and as the pack leader you need to correct her each and every time she attempts it.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
yeah, I knew it was a sign of dominance and I correct it. It's funny though, because she's small compared to K.O., he just brushes her off. But she is persistent. :dance:

Okay, so all the plus/minus stuff is from that same researcher that I looked at 2 yrs ago when deciding on K.O.'s timing for no-nutz.

What about a partial spay? or sometimes called ovary sparing? Where one ovary is kept but the uterus and one ovary are removed. I asked my Vet about it, about a month ago and they don't do that procedure but understood the potential benefit. There are 3 Vets fairly close-by that do it, so I would have to go there instead.
 

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The humping behavior may not go away if you spay. Our female used to do this as part of her play, and she played "really" rough with her half-brother who is three years older. We did a laparoscopy spay when she was 1-1/2, but the humpy behavior lasted until she was about two. She also used to bite him hard in the back legs. He let it go most of the time, but would correct her in his way!! You'd hear this nasty growl, and see this flash of dog go toward her. He wouldn't hurt her, but she'd be tip toing around him for days afterwards. He was the dominant one after all.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
The humping behavior may not go away if you spay. Our female used to do this as part of her play, and she played "really" rough with her half-brother who is three years older. We did a laparoscopy spay when she was 1-1/2, but the humpy behavior lasted until she was about two. She also used to bite him hard in the back legs. He let it go most of the time, but would correct her in his way!! You'd hear this nasty growl, and see this flash of dog go toward her. He wouldn't hurt her, but she'd be tip toing around him for days afterwards. He was the dominant one after all.

Interesting. Very parallel situation here. Half brother/sister, 3 year age difference, she goes after him hard and he is so tolerant, to a point. When he's had enough, you can easily tell when the hammer comes out. The young female, Kina, does the clench/humping of the older male during the rough play sessions.
 

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nearly eliminates the risk of pyometra, which otherwise would affect about 23% of intact female dogs; pyometra kills about 1% of intact female dogs
Just wanted to point out that in reality pyometra kills far more than 1% of intact female dogs. Only 1% would die if veterinary care was free and all owners did whatever was necessary to save their pet, but in reality the majority of dogs who have pyometra are euthanized. Pyometra is very expensive to treat, and by the time the owner figures out that the dog is ill there's often a lot more complications going on as a result of the pyometra which makes treating the dog and putting the dog under anesthetic very risky. I work at an emergency clinic and we get about 5 pyometra dogs per week, I've only ever seen one owner choose to treat it and the dog did not survive the surgery.
 

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Just wanted to point out that in reality pyometra kills far more than 1% of intact female dogs. Only 1% would die if veterinary care was free and all owners did whatever was necessary to save their pet, but in reality the majority of dogs who have pyometra are euthanized. Pyometra is very expensive to treat, and by the time the owner figures out that the dog is ill there's often a lot more complications going on as a result of the pyometra which makes treating the dog and putting the dog under anesthetic very risky. I work at an emergency clinic and we get about 5 pyometra dogs per week, I've only ever seen one owner choose to treat it and the dog did not survive the surgery.
I've never heard of pyometra. What is it?
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Kina started her first heat cycle Saturday, while we were on our first ever RV adventure in the new motorhome. See my other thread... "RV'ing with the Knuckleheads..."

Fortunately we had plenty of sheets and towels to keep the blood off of the new upholstery. The diapers?? Exactly! back home.
 
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