Boxer Breed Dog Forums banner

1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hi everyone. I'm new here and hoping maybe some of you have dealt with this before and might have some suggestions. My 3 year old female boxer Arya has been having some digestion issues lately and to be quite honest, I'm scared to death right now and not sure what to do. I'll give you some backstory on here because it may or may not be relevant. We just moved to a new state and she went from a house to an apartment on July 1. She's been pretty stressed due to the apartment noises and the fact that we moved here during peak fireworks season which she is terrified of. She is now scared to go outside at night thanks to some jerk setting of a giant firework a couple weeks ago while we were out. I have to take her out and reward her with chicken the whole time to try to get her over it.

She suffered from some diarrhea for the first couple of weeks which I resolved with a chicken and rice diet and some probiotics and then she seemed to be doing okay. A month ago, she was throwing up all night every two hours and then it was every hour and I started to see blood in it so we went to the emergency vet. They did x-rays and blood work and diagnosed her with gastroenteritis, gave her fluids, and sent her home with some medications and instructions to feed chicken and rice for a few days. She seemed to bounce back from that and I slowly put her back on her dog food. So three weeks later she starts with what's going on now.

Lately she's been showing signs of what a lot of people are thinking is acid reflux. She started a week ago when I had her on a hike and all she wanted to do was eat grass. She ate so much grass and then finally threw up. I let it go because to be honest she's been known to do that from time to time and then she's fine. Well, she didn't stop. She just kept trying to do it all day. She was drooling a lot and swallowing a lot. She was clearly nauseated and unable to resolve it herself. Upon the advice of a friend who is a vet tech, I switched her food to a fish based food and fed her small meals of rice throughout the day that weekend till I could get into the vet. The rice seemed to resolve any issues immediately. We got into the vet on Wednesday and he said the list of possible causes is so long that he wanted to treat the symptoms and see how that went. So she is now on Pepcid twice a day, sucralfate twice a day, and he wants her eating only chicken and rice for a month in small meals several times a day.

She seems ok when she has food in her belly and she was doing ok through the night but the last two nights she's been getting up around 3-4 and wanting out to eat grass. I give her a small meal of rice and she goes back to bed just fine.

I'm at a loss what to do. Monday I plan to call the vet and tell him I want to move forward with testing. Does anyone have any idea what might be going on?

Sent from my Pixel 2 using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,066 Posts
Sorry you are going through this. I would definitely get the testing to see if they can narrow it down to a cause.

I did have similar instances with Zuke awhile ago. He would get an attack maybe once a month and it would last a day. I don't think it was as severe as what you are going through. He would eat some grass, not eat any food, vomit twice, sleep the rest of the day and be ok the next morning. Vet said the same thing about gastroenteritis/IBS and suggested a probiotic. Ever since he has been on the probiotic he has been fine. I see you already went that route though. Hopefully with testing they can get it under control. Good luck
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,859 Posts
I'd rule out pancreatitis with the Spec-cPL test. The stomach, and esophagus can be chronically inflamed with some types of IBD. We had a Boxer who only responded to a formulated home-cooked diet due to complex food allergies. It was fish based. All of this was diagnosed when they did an endoscopy, and took stomach sample biopsies. If you go there find somebody really good who does this a lot. I wonder if she has something in her stomach from all the foraging she was doing. They can pick up small rocks, and sticks that can get stuck, but the endoscopy can look for all that stuff. With a young dog it's worth spending the money. We used Sulcrafate often if using a medication that would be rough on the stomach. We'd also feed small portions of rice or potato every couple hours so it wasn't empty.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
I'd rule out pancreatitis with the Spec-cPL test. The stomach, and esophagus can be chronically inflamed with some types of IBD. We had a Boxer who only responded to a formulated home-cooked diet due to complex food allergies. It was fish based. All of this was diagnosed when they did an endoscopy, and took stomach sample biopsies. If you go there find somebody really good who does this a lot. I wonder if she has something in her stomach from all the foraging she was doing. They can pick up small rocks, and sticks that can get stuck, but the endoscopy can look for all that stuff. With a young dog it's worth spending the money. We used Sulcrafate often if using a medication that would be rough on the stomach. We'd also feed small portions of rice or potato every couple hours so it wasn't empty.
After a friend put me in contact with a boxer breeder, I do plan to ask about pancreatitis. Apparently, it's relatively common in boxers. It's been in the back of my mind but she hasn't shown the other symptoms. Maybe it's just a milder case or something? I don't know how this all works.

I think they also ruled it out with the CBC, but I've been reading up on it and I guess that's not all that accurate, especially at the onset of a flare up. I took her to the vet less than 12 hours after the vomittimg started.

She's also definitely not overweight or inactive like it says most of the dogs with it are but I suppose it could be genetics or whatever it was she got ahold of that day, even though she couldn't have eaten more than a small bite. I'm so vigilant about what she's doing when we're out that this makes me so mad. They did do x-rays of her stomach that day to make sure nothing was in there.

I will be calling the vet first thing in the morning to insist they test for pancreatitis.

Sent from my Pixel 2 using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,851 Posts
I found this on the internet referring to similar symptoms. Routine blood work may not show any abnormalities, however further testing such as fluoroscopy/endoscopy may reveal the answer. I would insist on these tests. I hope you will share what you learn and that Arya is feeling better soon. We had a member some time ago that had problems with diareah & vomiting in her dog, they tried everything. In the end she put the dog on a raw diet and it solved all the problems with some time. I'm not an advocate of raw feeding but lately it appears to help many dogs.I would not make any changes in her diet until they find a solution. I also found this Other suggested reasons why your dog might be eating grass include improving digestion, treating intestinal worms, or fulfilling some unmet nutritional need, including the need for fiber. One published study reports on a miniature poodle that ate grass and then vomited every day for seven years. Three days after putting the dog on a high-fiber diet, the owner reported that the dog stopped eating grass entirely. I hope you find an answer.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
I found this on the internet referring to similar symptoms. Routine blood work may not show any abnormalities, however further testing such as fluoroscopy/endoscopy may reveal the answer. I would insist on these tests. I hope you will share what you learn and that Arya is feeling better soon. We had a member some time ago that had problems with diareah & vomiting in her dog, they tried everything. In the end she put the dog on a raw diet and it solved all the problems with some time. I'm not an advocate of raw feeding but lately it appears to help many dogs.I would not make any changes in her diet until they find a solution. I also found this Other suggested reasons why your dog might be eating grass include improving digestion, treating intestinal worms, or fulfilling some unmet nutritional need, including the need for fiber. One published study reports on a miniature poodle that ate grass and then vomited every day for seven years. Three days after putting the dog on a high-fiber diet, the owner reported that the dog stopped eating grass entirely. I hope you find an answer.
The vet is going to get her in today for additional blood work and then I guess we'll go from there. He mentioned a sonogram as the next step.

She's always been on some or the best foods so I wouldn't think she has any nutritional deficiencies. She also is clearly eating the grass due to an upset stomach. She will want out to eat grass and I'll give her a handful of the chicken and rice they vet has me feeling her and then she's fine and doesn't want out at all.

I will certainly keep everyone updated though. She's my whole world so I'm not going to give up.

Sent from my Pixel 2 using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,859 Posts
I'd find a specialty vet hospital that has a board-certified radiologist on staff. I think they're the most experienced in doing ultrasounds, and other diagnostics. Your vet would probably be okay referring, and you want to get the best results from the money you're spending. You might have to drive a little way to get to one.


If it was pancreatitis, the Amylase and Lipase test would both be off the charts. We'd do the Spec-cPL anyway after that. My Boxer also had Helicobactor infection that they found during the endoscopic exam. Antibiotics cured that up.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
The vet took some more blood yesterday to run it. He really really doesn't think it's pancreatitis because she's not really showing symptoms for that. She's only vomiting if I allow her to eat grass. She also doesn't show any abdominal pain. As long as she has food every 5 hours or so, she's completely herself running around like a maniac.

I have increased her Pepcid back to a tab and a half every 12 hours and she's making it through the night without needing food. I'm also going to take her off the chicken and rice and put her on Hills I/D and see how things go.

Depending on the blood test results, our next step will be the sonogram and we'll go from there.

Sent from my Pixel 2 using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
So blood test came back the other day. The vet said that one of the numbers was slightly elevated but not to the level that he thought would indicate pancreatitis. It could be issues with the pancreas or just GI issues, however, he doesn't think it's enough to get too worked up over. So for the next month, she's going on Hills I/D and staying on the Pepcid. If she handles that well, I can start to ween her off the Pepcid and start to transition over to a commercial food with low fat and low protein. I'm only going to do one of those at a time and see how she does. I'm really thinking of putting her on a home cooked food along with her kibble once we hopefully can go back to a regular food. I'm such a dog food snob and not a fan of having her on Hills.

Does anyone else do a home cooked diet for their dogs?

Sent from my Pixel 2 using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,851 Posts
Glad the bw came back good. It does seem that most boxer cannot handle high protein kibble, something around 24-26% usually is ok. I do not home cook but I have a friend on another forum that does. She ran a nutriscan on her poodles who have food sensitivities so she cooks for them.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
The thing is that I have always fed her higher end food because I wanted the best for it. That stuff is typically pretty high in protein so maybe I caused this by trying to give her the best

At least I have a direction to head in and hopefully things will start looking up.
Glad the bw came back good. It does seem that most boxer cannot handle high protein kibble, something around 24-26% usually is ok. I do not home cook but I have a friend on another forum that does. She ran a nutriscan on her poodles who have food sensitivities so she cooks for them.
Sent from my Pixel 2 using Tapatalk
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top