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You can mix anything together but IMO you open yourself up to another entire world of health issues.  Each specific breed had their own health issues and by breeding a dog with another, you get not only that breeds issues but the other breed as well, and when they charge twice as much for these "designer" breeds IMO how can you health test for anything when there are so many unknowns.
 

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It's a neat concept. I wouldn't go for one... if I wanted a boxer, I'd get a standard one. Just as if I wanted a chihuahua, one standard for it's size. I think that people have to be careful, what are the implications of breeding like this to not only the dog breed standards but the species itself?
 

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"There is NO Rottweiler blood in our Mini Rotts/Carlin Pinschers.

Depending on the litter, there may or may not be Boxer blood in the Mini Boxers."

8O

What's the point?  So, basically all the people are buying is a 20lb mutt that may have some physical traits of a boxer?  I always thought the miniature boxers were bred from boxers, just breed small examples together for several generations.
 

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I love how in the heading of their site they have this written...

{our experimental types of new dog breeds} emphasis on {EXPERIMENTAL}!

God, people actually TRUST these breeders???
 

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A Boston terrier is pretty much a mini boxer. Thats what I was going to get but then I found Tito. Personality and behaviour wise they're alot like a boxer. And do look like one.
 

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yeah, but bostons can actually be even MORE destructive on toys than boxers!  I know one 22lb boston who can outchew my boxer hands down!

Miniboxer=Kaci
not some pug/boston mix
 

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Okay, I understand Boxer lovers not wanting their beloved breed adulterated.  And I've read many threads here about how objectionable folks find the "designer" dog mixes like Labradoodles and whatnot.  But here's the bottom line, IMO.  Purebred dogs like ours have very short life spans in comparison to "mutts," likely because they generally have a plethora of genetically inherited health issues because of inbreeding.  That's that's why incest is so frowned upon by for us humans.  But we aren't taking care to see that it's not happening in our furry friends.  And we absolutely should be doing so.
 

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Inbreeding does not cause genetic disease; it simply increases homozygosity so that recessives are more likely to be expressed.  Since many genetic disease are dominant and/or polygenetic, inbreeding or outbreeding is not as much of a factor as one would think.  

Recycling an earlier post:

While the myth of "hybrid vigor" is well-circulated among mixed-breed breeders, the reality is something else entirely.  (For one thing, in the true sense of the term "hybrid vigor" applies to mixing different species, and originated with plants.)  Hybrid vigor only applies to recessive traits, and only to the first generation; once you breed your F1 offspring together, you've got just as much chance on doubling up on those recessives as you had in the original breed - except now you've got potentially twice as many recessive traits, because you've got them from both parent breeds.  Dominant and polygenic traits are not avoided by mixing breeds in any case.  And of course there are common problems among many breeds, which are not avoided when mixing.  

Boxers have 43 genetic diseases; Boston Terriers have 39; and Pugs have 36.  (These are the main breeds used in creating "mini-Boxers"; I don't have information on genetic diseases in Rat Terriers, so these numbers will be lower than reality.)  Of these, 10 are shared by all three breeds and another 13 are shared by at least two.  Even assuming they're all recessive - they're not, of course - that means there's a good chance of doubling up on 23 diseases in the first generation; there are another 85 diseases which will not be present in the first generation, but may show up once those dogs are bred together.  In fact, Dr. Padgett at MSU identified 102 genetic diseases in mixed-breed dogs.  If one does not have knowledge of these diseases, in all the breeds, and their modes of inheritance, expression, heritability, etc., how can one possibly expect to produce healthy puppies?
 
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