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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My 7 month old female boxer puppy was just diagnosed with PS. We are being referred to Texas A&M for balloon valvuloplasty. Anyone out there with similar experience?
 

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I'm sorry. I fortunately have not gone thru this. From what I understand the dog will need to be monitored every 6 months after the valvulplasy then yearly. I also understand it to be hereditary, so the breeder should be notified and breeding of affected animals is highly discouraged.
 

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I am sorry to hear this as Linda51 says its a hereditary thing and the breeder should have had heart studies done on the dogs before breeding. I wish you the best of luck I have had to deal with other things but not this one. Keep us updated on how she does and how it goes I am sure there will be others that will benefit from the info.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I'm sorry. I fortunately have not gone thru this. From what I understand the dog will need to be monitored every 6 months after the valvulplasy then yearly. I also understand it to be hereditary, so the breeder should be notified and breeding of affected animals is highly discouraged.
I'm sorry. I fortunately have not gone thru this. From what I understand the dog will need to be monitored every 6 months after the valvulplasy then yearly. I also understand it to be hereditary, so the breeder should be notified and breeding of affected animals is highly discouraged.
I have notified the breeder and lets just say the conversation was "frosty" at first. As far as I know she has not notified the other 7 litter mates and the same breeding pair is expecting another litter next month. In the breeders defense, both parents were checked out and were cleared for heart issues before breeding which is why I was surprised by the severity of Christas condition. I have put the whole story out here on my Facebook and put the post as public hoping that perhaps someone might see it from Christas litter. Our appointment at Texas A& M is for July 27. Just trying to keep positive and keep my little boxer girl quiet until we can go and get treatment.
 

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Wishing you the best for your little girl and her treatment its great you are hanging in there with her. That's strange the breeder is so defensive you would think they would want to assist in anyway possible. It depends on what heart tests that breeder used I would guess as to if the stenosis was found or not. Please keep us informed on what happens with your dog we are all pulling for you for success with her treatment.
 

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Best wishes for you and your pup. I was glad to hear that breeder did the necessary testing on her breeding stock. This news perhaps will make her rethink about a Christmas litter or re- test. Perhaps your pup was just a fluke, genetics are a funny thing you never know when something will pop up. One can do all the testing and still unfortunately life happens. At least you know you won't be breeding yours and if it is a fluke it stops here. I hope you will come back and let us know how she does. I lost my boxer to a neurological issue a little over a year ago, he was only 5 and was the best behaved boxer ever. I also have a st poodle, I haven't been too good about getting another boxer though the urge is getting stronger but reality tells me I should not.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
We had our consultation at Texas A&M vet school. Long drive but a very impressive cardiology department. They repeated the echocardiogram and looked at all Christas readings and described the different types of PS that a dog can have. Christa's is one with tethered valve walls that stick to the side of the heart and have a small hook or bump on the ends that go inward. This type of PS does not respond well to valvuplasty as the hook/bump will often just bounce right back out. They started her on Atenolol which she will be on for life. We will return in 8 months when she is full grown for a repeat echo as sometimes the PS worsens once the dog is full grown or remains stable. What also was interesting is that this is generally not symptomatic and therefore not diagnosed before the dog is full grown. We were just lucky in that we discovered it very early before heart damage could occur. Once she reaches her full dose of atenolol and is stabilized on it, we will proceed with her spay. Texas A&M reassured me that there is no reason that with medical management, Christa should live a long and normal life. If at anytime her PS progresses, they can do the valvuloplasty. We left feeling very positive and hopeful.
 

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That is pretty good news. Definitely worth the long drive and expense. I hope she is one who stabilizes and lives a long normal life. A feel good moment today!
 

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That is good news! I am so glad you shared that with everyone I was wondering what happened with this dog. It sounds like your dog was very fortunate she got you for an owner! Its really good that there is a drug management option for this problem I hope she is one of the ones who will will remain stable and not get worse. I hope you will stay on the forum and let us know how she continues to do. The info may help someone else who finds them selves and their loved puppy in this situation.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I want to give an update on Christa now that she is one years old. She was doing quite well, seemed stable until one night she was sleeping so close to me that I could hear her heartbeat and it was extremely irregular. The next day I called my vet and took her in and she did have a very irregular heartbeat. ? atrial fib - so my vet ordered a holter monitor and due to Thanksgiving it took some time to come. During this time that she had the irregular heart beat, she also acted as if she did not feel well. Was just generally cranky, growled a bit and actually nipped at one of us one day. This went on for about a week. In the meantime the holter arrived and we did it for 24 hours and sent it off for evaluation. It was IMO basically useless as it showed nothing except one run of extreme tachycardia for which they said to try and keep her from playing too much. Ha Ha - try that with an 11 month old boxer who has a 1 1/2 year old boxer brother. Anyway she is now feeling great, back to her usual sweet nature. I did call Texas A&M and we have another appointment on March 1st. She will be essentially full grown then. I still on occasion find myself listening to her heart and I know I probably shouldn't - doesn't help anything but make me crazy. There does seem to be a real correlation though to her cranky mood and irregular rhythm. This next visit will be interesting. I may push for the valvoplasty especially in light of what happened. I will update if anything changes and of course after our next appointment. Merry Christmas everyone.
 

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I am so sorry you are going thru this with your dog I know how stressful this must be. I hope you keep us updated on what’s going on this may very well help someone else. This is the very reason all breeding dogs should be fully tested.
 

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Cardiomyopathy is a condition that Boxers may suffer from. Boxers are more at risk for this disorder than other dog breeds because of their genes. Boxers with Cardiomyopathy will have an irregular heartbeat and may faint. Their hearts are not able to effectively pump blood to all the different parts of their body. You may begin to notice symptoms of this disease when your dog is about two years old.
I discovered this after Dozer fainted and urinated on the living room floor, it was horrifying. I thought he was dying and he was only 6 at the time.
Since then I monitor and track his exercise and calm him down quickly if he gets to excited. He's 8 now and hasn't had another episode to date.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Cardiomyopathy is a condition that Boxers may suffer from. Boxers are more at risk for this disorder than other dog breeds because of their genes. Boxers with Cardiomyopathy will have an irregular heartbeat and may faint. Their hearts are not able to effectively pump blood to all the different parts of their body. You may begin to notice symptoms of this disease when your dog is about two years old.
I discovered this after Dozer fainted and urinated on the living room floor, it was horrifying. I thought he was dying and he was only 6 at the time.
Since then I monitor and track his exercise and calm him down quickly if he gets to excited. He's 8 now and hasn't had another episode to date.
 

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Cardiomyopathy is a condition that Boxers may suffer from. Boxers are more at risk for this disorder than other dog breeds because of their genes. Boxers with Cardiomyopathy will have an irregular heartbeat and may faint. Their hearts are not able to effectively pump blood to all the different parts of their body. You may begin to notice symptoms of this disease when your dog is about two years old.
I discovered this after Dozer fainted and urinated on the living room floor, it was horrifying. I thought he was dying and he was only 6 at the time.
Since then I monitor and track his exercise and calm him down quickly if he gets to excited. He's 8 now and hasn't had another episode to date.
Cardiomyopathy in Boxers has another cause “grain free dog food” I lost two this way I think a lot of times the Boxer genetics thing is used to cover up what I consider wrong doing on the pet food industry the smaller food companies had to come up with a plan to sell and market their foods to compete with the giants in the industry so gave birth to the grain free phenomena so now everyone does it competing for your pet food dollars at the expense of our beloved dogs. You have people at these boutique pet stores who are not trained in dog nutrition convincing people that just about everything under the sun is caused because of grain inclusive foods and it’s just not true. Dog food nutritionist study for years and year to become certified so im doubtful any of these people you encounter know all that much. I will never make that mistake again! The fainting and urination you describe is caused by the heart going out of rhythm speeding too fast I know because I went thru this twice my dogs went into full blown DCM really quickly as the food induced type seems to progress faster it’s a heart breaking thing to watch your dog die from and I never want to see it again. The genetic kind of DCM usually shows up slower I know of two Boxers that have it genetically they were never fed grain free one is 8 and the other is 7 and they are both on heart meds now they seem to lead pretty regular lives just keeping the activity and excitement in check. You can protect yourself easily from the food induced variety don’t feed grain free and don’t feed any grain inclusive with peas and lentils in the first 10 ingredients listed on the bag (at least this is the current guidance) and no they are still not sure of the cause of the food related DCM. I also avoid the foods named on the FDA website with reported deaths. Buy puppies only from reputable breeders who have dine their genetic testing on their breeding animals that is very important
 
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