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We got Gus almost 4 weeks ago. He's almost 12 weeks and he won't stop biting. Its playful biting but we have 2 small children and we can not get him to stop. He has drawn blood on me 3 times. What can we do? We have had a boxer. French mastiff and american bulldog and have always been able to stop the biting really quickly in the past but Gus just doesn't get it.
 

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Land shark phase is the worst, couldn't wait till my guy was done teething. I'm sure you tried all these things but things that worked for me were a puppy nylabone, anytime he did bite I would say "no" and stick a tug toy in his mouth. If he still didn't want to listen, the leash went on and he lost his freedom. My guy had a bad habit of sneaking up behind and going for the achilles. It never really fully stopped until he was done teething, I think its just managing it as best you can with some puppies.
 

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We did the usual with Kai when he got "the bites" but what we found is...he was tired...just like a toddler. So when he got like this we would take him outside for a quick potty and crate him. Usually he would sleep for at least 2 hours. Then he wouldn't be a crazy biting. My poodle pup was the worse biter ever, he drew blood on me many times. I always said NO BITE, I tried all the methods, crating is the only thing that helped but I will tell you he was a wild one. I did all the yelping too, some say that helps but he really have to be quick about it. Having small children makes raising a puppy more difficult. It will get better. My boxer now has the softest mouth, he will not put his mouth on you at all.
 

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I found distraction worked with Willow. A squeaker toy or something she really liked helped. Also I gave a loud NO or yelped and then gave her the thing that distracted her. Or I would just ignore (although I know that’s hard!!), sometimes I had to sit cross legged and hide my face and hands (so she couldn’t nip them) with my back to her and just ignore her until she found something more interesting to do.
 

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Oh and I found holding onto her lower jaw and pushing down with my thumb (inside her mouth) helped (not too hard, but enough to show her who was boss). And they say that pinning them down shows that you’re dominant, so I’d pin her every now and then with just enough pressure that she couldn’t wiggle away.
 

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Thanks guys. I have pretty much tried all these. He will actually go all night in the crate already without whining. We haven't really lost any sleep since the first week or two. I dont want to put him in his crate as a punishment. I guess I just need to stop playing with him when he bites. But that's how he seems to want to play.
 

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no no I did not mean as punishment...My guy was literally tired and needed a nap. Whenever he would get really crazy biting thats what was wrong. I didn't just grab and put him in. I distracted, took him outside to potty, praised when we cam in and told him it was nap time. He would then sleep like two hours. Puppies at that age really need a lot of sleep.
 

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I think they can go into a sort of frenzy if they're overstimulated, or tired. At one point I would put a kong filled with some peanut butter in the crate. I kept it in the freezer. If he won't go in his crate without a big fight, this may not work.
 

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We got Gus almost 4 weeks ago. He's almost 12 weeks and he won't stop biting. Its playful biting but we have 2 small children and we can not get him to stop. He has drawn blood on me 3 times. What can we do? We have had a boxer. French mastiff and american bulldog and have always been able to stop the biting really quickly in the past but Gus just doesn't get it.
Here's a few suggestions. Make sure ALL members of your household are on board and do not rely on children of ANY age to adhere to these; they will always need an adult present to enforce. If you can't get this under control soon, bring a pro trainer who has the right training themselves into your situation. Some dogs are just wired differently or else they didn't learn any level of bite inhibition from their momma or their humans.

- Starting today, never, ever, allow ANY type of tug of war games with toys, no mouthing, no chewing on your sleeve, no chewing on a toy you are holding, no licking your hands/face/anything, etc.
Not while playing, not while trying to pacify your puppy, just never. Not while pup is sleepy and sweetly licking you. No mouth to human contact of any sort. No mouth to clothing contact.

- One way to approach this behavior...
Scenerio: Pup is playing and energy is ramping up. Pup starts chewing on your clothes or actually bites/chews on your hand, foot, etc, or puppy is trying to initiate a game of tug of war:

1) Say "No" in a CALM voice & place an appropriate toy in his mouth. ALWAYS have an appropriate toy within reach to REPLACE your hand, clothes, etc.
Make sure you have multiple teething toys available for at least the next year.

2) If his biting/chewing/licking continues (in other words, ANY form of mouth contact with a human or their clothing), calmly turn around and fold your arms. DO NOT engage with the pup in ANY way... no eye contact, no talking to him, no yelling at him. No glancing back at him. No laughing at him. Turn your back on him with your arms folded. RELAX. Take a deep breath. You want NO interaction, and this includes turning your back on him in a tense, frustrated demeanor. Give him a boring blank slate. Do not engage with the pup again until he stops the unwanted behavior. If he barks or tries to circle around to your front, be boring and keep your arms folded and turn your back to him. If he sits or if he wanders away, or if he lowers his energy level and stops the bad behavior you are trying to stop, you can go back to interacting with him. When you resume interacting with him, go back to playing appropriately (with multiple appropriate toys nearby to redirect him to over, & over, & over, & over again) as if nothing happened.

3) When your pup is exhibiting this kind of behavior, find a good time (when he IS behaving) to try to tire out his mind with a short training session using high value treats as incentive. Work on "sit". Work on recall work. Think of things to teach him. Play fetch (but NO tug of war over the fetch object!! Have a 2nd ball/toy available to throw when he brings the ball or give a treat upon release of ball but NO tug of war is allowed with a mouthy, biting puppy). Keep training sessions short and positive. Use training sessions as a reward, never as a punishment.

Hope this helps! Good luck with your pup. As you know from the multiple dogs you've had, the 1st year is the hardest. It's usually uphill from there!
 

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You may also try some toys that you can get wet and put in the freezer. This can help if some of his biting is due to teething discomfort.
 

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You may also try some toys that you can get wet and put in the freezer. This can help if some of his biting is due to teething discomfort.
That's a really great suggestion. The process of redirecting my current puppy to chew on appropriate teething toys has been going very well so far, but even so, it's seriously mind boggling how much time he spends chewing on things to self soothe as he goes through teething. He also requires different types of teething surfaces at different times. Sometimes he comforts himself with a very hard teething object, sometimes with a medium soft Kong type toy, & sometimes with a soft but sturdy fabric toy (the fabric ones I supervise closely).
 

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That's a really great suggestion. The process of redirecting my current puppy to chew on appropriate teething toys has been going very well so far, but even so, it's seriously mind boggling how much time he spends chewing on things to self soothe as he goes through teething. He also requires different types of teething surfaces at different times. Sometimes he comforts himself with a very hard teething object, sometimes with a medium soft Kong type toy, & sometimes with a soft but sturdy fabric toy (the fabric ones I supervise closely).
We got a toy off of Amazon (we get most of their toys there) but this one was specifically meant for puppies and to get it wet and freeze it, and then let them chew on it. It wasn't super durable, but there are probably others, or things you can find on the web that may help. Our 'puppy' (he's almost 2) loves to chew on ice too.
 
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