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So my puppy (bambii) since the day we got her has jumped in my adult blue heelers face. Bambii literally jumps over and over while licking the other dogs face. Are there any tricks I can use to make her stop before a fight starts? The blue heeler has already nipped at Bambii a few times and it doesn't phase her
 

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Don't have two dogs maybe someone can reply who has dealt with this.

I just know when my guy was a pup and would do that with my friends dogs, I would have him leashed and a quick correction with a no. Took awhile and a ton of repetition but it finally sunk in. It seems that is typical of the boxer pup, bouncing around side to side, licking the face and ears, etc.
 

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It's gonna be a "PIA!" Your gonna need a "leash" and an EX-Pen, when you want a break! And you'll need to use the leash to keep the puppy out of your "Blue Heeler's" face!

I don't think Blue Heelers, are known for having a lot of patience?? Unfortunately, you don't seem to have a natural born "Puppy Raiser??" Don't leave them alone unsupervised!
 

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Your pup is behaving perfectly normal – its called socializing and this is a good sign. It’s licking the older dogs lips to show it’s accepting him as the leader of the two – don’t punish for doing this. The nipping is showing the pup who the leader is – and telling the pup to keep its distance. If your older dog is sound and stable, it will not bite the pup – you will understand the old dog ( and reactions) better than anyone here on the forum.
 

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No one said anything about "punishing the puppy??? And ... "Sound and Stable" are not attributes I apply to "Herder Dogs??" A "pretty low threshold for Crap," would I think be more accurate?? The older dog is the cause for concern, the puppy is doing what puppies do. :)

But "we" can't/having seen the dog and puppy together?? So for all we know ... there interaction, might be perfectly normal??? But what it sounds like ... is that the resident dog ..is not to "eager" to be a "puppy parent??" Some dogs are, some dogs, not so much???

What I would look for is an adult dog that bows down to the puppy's level and who is willing to "engage the pup in play." If they are not seeing that happen, uh pretty much right away?? Then they have a bit more of a "burden" then they assumed, they'd have when they brought the little guy home???"

If they are "overly concerned" (about the situation) they could most likely find a trainer locally (for eyes on) and have an eval done on the "situation??" It's an easy way to have some peace of mind, pretty quickly.

And this looks like a pretty good article.:
https://www.clickertraining.com/what-to-expect-introducing-a-puppy-to-your-adult-dogs


I have no experience, on the "Clicker Part??" But it looks like sound advise. But it should give the OP a better understanding of "what the deal is here?? :)
 

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I did not say that someone said to punish the dog, what I meant that the consequences of the situation should not be frustration towards the pup – I provided my interpretation of a situation between a pup and an older dog – I remain by my comments that both are reacting normal. I popped the question if the older dog is sound and stable, but left it open– I clearly started that the owner would be the best person to determine this.
Having said that, there could be a real issues coming up, but I believe the OP first needs to hear some views on what is possibly going on if the OP is not already aware
Why is the older dog a concern? It is doing what any dog would do if the “into it’s face” is getting too much, this is a normal reaction, but again it’s the owner who will have to asses if it’s a real situation.
We need to get away from knee jerk reactions when a dog does something we humans don’t like to classify these are “behavioral” issues that need immediate correction.
Sometimes we need to let dogs be dogs – they have instinct and the capacity to resolve their problems on their own, quite often better than we humans can.
 

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Aw, well not really gonna "debate" facts not in evidence?? No one said "either dog or puppy was wrong??" No one, said anything about "Corrections or Punishment??"

They saw "something" that they consider "concerning" and they asked "what's up with this??" And that is what a "heads up owner does." :)

And thus far by my count, they got three answers (not counting the article, I linked.) Two for put put a leash on the puppy and "manage" the interact of the two together." And one for "let them work it out." My "interpretation" of your stated position, I'll grant ... but that is how I saw it??

It really does not matter, I cited a source "I" trust for the "management position." And they also stated:

We have three dogs (permanent family members) and each new puppy addition has taught us more about how adult dogs and puppies integrate. We're working on puppy #15 and here is what I've learned so far:

None of my dogs has ever welcomed a puppy with open arms (paws)
All of the dogs growl and snap and move away from the pup
NONE of the dogs has ever hurt a puppy


Well that "was" a bit of a surprise to me?? As my (formerly dog aggressive, American Band Dawg, Luv'd puppies! But hey he was a "Band Dawg" so he had a "pretty high threshold for BS, I suppose??" A different "breed" of dog ... maybe not so much???

At any rate "on here" I think I remember Lindar51, saying her Boxer was not to "thrilled" with her new "Poodle" at first?? I think her insight on "this" would be pretty interesting. :)
 

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OK I go for this...My boxer is the best boy in the world, my standard poodle isn't...yet. The poodle is a mouthy breed, in that I mean he plays using his mouth. When he was young those little teeth hurt the boxer who never corrected the puppy. I did the "let them work it out". So I had to leash the puppy in order to make correction or at least to give my boxer a break. This poodle is doing well in his training but has a long way to go in off leash/house manners. While he listens to commands he has yet to settle down. I don't think poodles calm themselves till they are 3 or 4. But we are working on it. The boxer and poodle get along and at times will just sit next to one another but the moment the boxer gets up the poodle is in his face. He has learned though now that he is getting older to not bite. Most times now he will lick his jowls and ears but occasionally he will bite at his legs. A firm no bite usually works but there are still time I just have to leash him . Oh in the boxer has actually cried and just stood there but never ever mouths back. That boy doesn't mouth anything. We are a work in progress.
 

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Some dogs will flip, and lay on a dog that licks their face. It looks very aggressive, but it's an instructional moment. I think a dog that will react to a passive approach in another dog is a bit of a bully. Maybe they are just using it as a teaching moment that "being passive" may get you in trouble later.
 

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So my puppy (bambii) since the day we got her has jumped in my adult blue heelers face. Bambii literally jumps over and over while licking the other dogs face. Are there any tricks I can use to make her stop before a fight starts? The blue heeler has already nipped at Bambii a few times and it doesn't phase her
I agree with other comments here that you know your older dog better than anyone.

Our puppy did this with our older boxers, he still does sometimes, but not very often. He's about 20 months old now. All of ours are boxers so our older boys may be more tolerant than another breed, I'm not sure.

We supervised their play for the first few months so we could intervene or correct if needed. We never really had any issues from the 'puppy in the face'. Our alpha will snap or give an "I mean business" growl if it is too much for him. He's a talker as is and we didn't think he'd bite, and never has. Our older beta boxer will either play too, or he'll go away and lay down to let the puppy know he's not into it.

We watched our older boys do some face / open mouth growly play (I'm not sure how to really describe it) when they were little, and they both do this with the puppy some now too.

I'm not sure this helps you much...if your older dog is not tolerant and/or the puppy is too aggressive you'll need to help them learn what's OK and what's not before it turns into something you can't control.
 
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