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Discussion Starter #1
Is there any recommended series of shots for boxers or rather combinations that should not be given?  I read somewhere that it's not advisable to give 5, 6, and 7 combination shots, but don't really know what that means.  I'm looking for a vet for Sophie's 9 week shot(s) and just wondered what I need to know or make sure I ask the vet?
 

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There are no special vaccinations (for boxers) and when it comes to shots there will always be a difference of opinion of what they need and don't need.  Normally someone always brings up the AAHA guidelines, so you can check the web site for them......So, I will tell you how I vaccinated Fiona.

She had a DHPP (4 in 1 ) at 6 weeks
She had a DHPP (4 in 1) at 9 weeks
She had a DHLPPC (6 in 1) at 13 weeks with an additional vacc of Rabies and Bordetella  (this series added Lepto and Corona)

She had a DHPP Booster at 16 weeks (because I am exposed to parvo and distemper and therefore can expose her on almost a daily basis....
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks very much for the information Sharon.  I'll print this off so I can do the same.  I appreciate your time.
 

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The AAHA has updated their website again, so the link to their guidelines in past threads probably won't work anymore.  Here's the current link:
http://www.aahanet.org/PublicDocuments/ ... evised.pdf

In a nutshell, AAHA recommends these core vaccines for every dog:

Parvo, distemper, and adenovirus2: 3-shot puppy series, 3-4 weeks apart, between 6 and 16 weeks (as a side note, most vet schools recommend 8-9 weeks as the minimum age for most breeds); booster one year later; booster every three years after that.

Rabies: one dose anytime after 12 weeks of age (many people feel later is better for this one, or at least 3-4 weeks apart from the other shots, but there are legal mandates in many areas for rabies vaccines); booster one year later; booster every three years after that (unless law requires it more often).

Non-core vaccines, given on an individual basis to at-risk dogs:
Bordatella (kennel cough)
Borrelia (Lyme)
Lepto

Not-recommended vaccines:
Coronavirus (some immunologists have called this "a vaccine in search of a disease")
Giardia (vaccination has not been shown to prevent infection)


Some alternative protocols, from Ronald D. Schultz, PhD, ACVIM(H), Chair of UW-Madison's Veterinary Pathology Department:

Minimal
Parvo/distemper/adenovirus/rabies at 12 weeks or older; rabies booster one year later; rabies booster every three years (other vaccines would not be boostered).

Moderate
Parvo/distemper at 6-9 weeks; parvo/distemper/adenovirus/rabies at 12-15 weeks; booster all one year later; booster rabies every 3 years, others every 3-5 years.
(This is similar to what Jean Dodds, DVM recommends, though she suggests titering after the first-year booster rather than blindly vaccinating)

Maximal
Parvo/distemper at 6-8 weeks; parvo/distemper/adenovirus at 9-11 weeks; parvo/distemper/adenovirus/rabies at 12-14 weeks; booster all one year later; booster all every three years.

One important thing that the AAHA notes, and the AVMA supports in their position statments, is that the vaccination protocol should be tailored to the individual dog (excluding legal mandates, of course).  Not only because of regional differences (as far as risk/exposure to some diseases), but because of genetics, lifestyle, and environmental factors.  (Rottweilers, for example, and other black-and-tan breeds have different requirements for parvo vaccination, needing high-titer vaccines at younger ages.  Many natural-rearing, raw-feeding breeders don't vaccinate at all, but this is generally not a wise decision for conventional-rearing, kibble-feeding owners.)  (Another important thing about which both organizations agree, though not specifically about puppy shots, is that annual vaccinations are unnecessary; the AVMA does not suggest a specific revaccination interval, the AAHA has picked three years as a random compromise number.)
 

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wow sharon i did'nt know that humans could be carriers of parvo! that blows my mind! and i am relieved tyson got the same shots fiona got! i know i am good for now.
 

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Oh sure, everytime you leave the house you run the risk of bringing parvo back in (or distemper, or kennel cough); humans aren't carries in that they harbor the virus in their body and pass it on - it's just that parvo (et al) virus is shed in feces and bodily fluids, and lives for a long time in the ground, and so may be on the sidewalk or in the grass or in the slobber of the dog down the street, and you bring it in on your shoes or clothes or hands.  Sharon, being a vet, has a much higher chance of exposure to parvo - vet's offices are really one of the riskiest places you can take a puppy, which is quite a conundrum, and is why many people won't let their puppies on the floor of the vet's office.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
But I agree with full protection for my babies, because of dog parks (which I am not even sure I would go to one in the first place after reading some serious cons about them), or going to Pet shops (probably wouldn't do that either, dog training, etc.  You never know where you might encounter a problem, and I'd rather be safe than sorry.  For the next 30 days I'm still living in an apartment complex where there are lots and lots of dogs and new puppies and I don't know who has what, so until we move to our new home, I won't even take her down to the grass because I have no idea what's lurking down there, or what's been sprayed or fertilized.  That's why I asked the question in the first place.  I don't want to put her at risk by not doing the right thing, and what's good enough for Sharon is good enough for me.
 

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I only vaccinate for what I need.   The vet will offer up an "ala carte" menu of vaccinations that basically I do not need.

I am really enjoying learning more of alternative methods to medication and chemicals.   However there are the ones that are totally required as Jennifer points out.  

I think many like the bordella are basically useless, if you are feeding a proper diet the immune system on your dog should be up to par, and although the bordella only provides protection against certain strings of KC, I think (IMO) a sturdy helthy immune system will be more effective.

Other like Lepo, lime etc should IMO only be given if you are in an affected area.   A lot of ethics can come into play with vaccinations:)
 

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I agree with Newcastle 100%....We actually have a sign at our office that ask people to hold puppies if they are not in a carrier and not to allow others to pet the pups.  It seems kind of harsh for some, but at the same time you never know.  The person who comes up and loves on your pup may be there because the pup they have is sick, maybe they just cleaned feces or vomit out of the car on the trip over.  

I always cringe when I see little 6-9-12 weeks old puppies running around PetsMart on the floor and things like that.....

However....we are in a HIGH parvo area at the moment. Most of the southern coast is.  I have a friend in Texas and they say there is a bad outbreak there too.

As HannaBanana pointed out Ethics plays a part, the opinion of some of the older doctors vs the new ones and also Money plays a part in sales and drug manuft. profits.  not much different them human med there.
 

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I think the AAHA guidelines are a good compromise for most pet owners, greatly decreasing the number of vaccinations while giving high odds for protection.  It's still far more vaccinations that I personally feel comfortable giving, but far fewer than have been "traditionally" given (puppies who got a 4-shot series of 7-in-1 vaccines were  getting, in effect 28 vaccines - actually 29 if you include rabies - by the time they were just four months old!).  

I included the other protocols just for some ideas of the range of effective vaccination - I should have noted that in both clinical and serological trials, even Dr. Schultz's Minimal protocol provided at least seven years immunity for the majority of dogs.  (Dr. Schultz felt immunity would be lifelong, but the study ended after seven years so there is no data past that point.)  I probably should also have noted that Dr. Schultz was one of the many experts involved in developing the AAHA guidelines.
 
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