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Discussion Starter #1
So I am a runner...I run at least 5 miles a day...here is my questions...Are there any other runners on here who take their boxer with them?? And if so, is it ok on their feet??  Do they get tired fast??  I have always had labradors in the past which were great running partners, and I want Lette to be my running partner but I am afraid it wont be good on her little feet...She is my baby and I want to take the best care of her that I can...And make sure everything is kosher...I know she likes to go for walks on the leash, but I am wanting to run with her!!!  



Lette and Sunny :)
 

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Hey, there...how old is Lette?  Depending on age, they say a "five minute per month of age" walk is best...someone here might have a good idea of what age it's ok to go onger and further...but, honestly...Boxers are HYPER and NEED excercise...and it seems to me that you would be very aware of how she was doing...you wouldn't push her any further then she wanted to go...my dogs have pretty tough feet...they are sensitive to extremes of cold and heat...but, you can get "shoes" to help with that...I'd be willing to bet she would LOVE IT! :)  Don't know how much that helps...there will be many others behind me who know more!  


BTW Welcome! Beautiful dog you have there!
 

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Lette is a little under a year old...I saved her from a rescue, soooooo we dont know her exact birth date...
 

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Lette is a gorgeous girl, love those black masks  :D If she's 18 months or older from bone development standpoint she should be ok. Just watch the hot days, with their short noses boxers get winded in the heat easily. When we were in training classes the instructor said to watch for widening of the tongue, I think it's called "splaying" when they get that tired it's time to STOP  :D
 

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I would probably wait at least 8 months before taking her running.  The reason is it takes until 18-24 months for their growth plates to close and you don't want to damage them before that with high impact, "forced" exercise.
 

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I'm trying to get Ringer nicer on the leash before summer when he will be physically ready to run with me, too.  They are certainly not labs but I suspect they make fine running partners. I have actually never run with a dog so I really don't know what to expect.  I would think that my expected pace of 6-7 min miles over 5 to 10 miles may be a bit much for our short nosed pups and probably the same for labs too.

Would you call this splaying?
 

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I would wait a bit longer before taking her running, like was already said, their growth plates don't close til about 18 mos. Any strenous exercise, be it running, agility needs to wait until then...It would make it easier on her joints tho to run on grass rather than pavement..No doubt she would enjoy the running, Boxers just like to go with their "humans"..Depending on where you live, any strenous exercise needs to monitored in extreme weather conditions...I live in the south, so any walks here in the summer are always done early in the day....
 

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Fredo is only 8 months so I am not really able to run with him yet either. I take him to the park and let him go for it himself so he can get the energy out he needs but I won't force him to keep a pace with me yet. If I run around he chases me but that's about it.  In another year we'll start training together...and I can't wait.
 
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I take my 22 males running every day. THey stay off blacktop cement and gravel and run about a half mile a day... They love it and go further than me most the time. but when i started mine would run a fifth of a mile and not act like anything was the problem while i was panting.... (Quitting smoking and running is rough on me)
 

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Maybe you can both start a fast pace walk at first. I didn't see you mention if she can heal or walk loose leash. If not, this would be a key thing to work on while she is still growing. I think a boxer would be tough to run with if she cannot heal or walk loose leash becasue they are strong and they like to bolt anytime something looks interesting.

I know when Britney gets old enough I will take her landrolling blading  :lol: I love watching ceasar do this with his pack....  So far, she is about 55% away from loose leash walking....
 

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I have tried taking Xena running with me quite a few times and encountered 2 problems...

1. She's a horrible leash walker
2. She gets winded very easily. Usually after a mile she'd plop right down in the grass and refuse to continue running. The only way she'd get up was if we were headed towards home.

I dont know if a boxer could handle that long of a run. Their short noses make it quite difficult.
 

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PlaYtiMe24_7\";p=\"78536 said:
2. She gets winded very easily. Usually after a mile she'd plop right down in the grass and refuse to continue running. The only way she'd get up was if we were headed towards home.


:lol:
 

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I think he meant 2... lol I think!??

I take Odin for walks and I'll have a short sprint  here and there... nothing strainuous or anything... I just do it to see how he'd do. I tried to get on my bike and put him along next to me. He doesn't like my bike... and I didn't want to be pulled off of it by him so I ended that quickly. I want to to roller blade with him... I think that'd be cool. Running would be great if I could get back into shape again... having babies ruined my physically! LOL

I agree with everyone else though... to wait till at least 18 months age. I suggest taking it step by step. A little at a time... I'm sure like humans... some one can't just run 5 miles first time without ever having done it before. But I'm sure you can work her up into that and MORE once she's old enough.
 

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We took hailee on a walk yesterday, we didnt run and went about 45 min and she LOVED it couldnt get enough didnt want to stop but we made her hehe  :lol: we take her about once or twice a week and small walks inbetween shes only 7 months so we dont want to strain her.. like everyone else said take small steps and dont strain you pup
 

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I began running with Daisy when she was about 6 months old.  My vet stated that the exercise would strengthen her bones and muscle, as opposed to harming growth as others have suggested to you.  She needs to be treated just like any human runner, by which I mean gradually building distance, feeding her enough calories and keeping her hydrated.  I found that her stomach is senstitive depending on what she eats prior to a "long" run (more than 5 miles).  Again, treat her like a human runner by giving EASILY digestible carbs and protein.  I was warry of running her on the paved roadway because of her paws, however, the vet suggested that trails are riskier due to thorns, splinters, etc.  So far Daisy has had no foot/leg/muscle problems in 18 months and hundreds of miles.  I ALWAYS keep her on a short leash and run primarily on the road.  She is now turning 2 yrs old and capable of running a full marathon (26.2 miles).  I typically don't run with her more than 15 miles at a time but will take her up to 20 miles.  The problem is not Daisy's endurance, it's mine.  It can be pretty strenuous to control a boxer that wants to chase deer, horses, cows, other dogs, etc, when you are  nearing your own point of exhaustion.  Now, at age 2, I have not found a distance or speed that she can't handle.  I highly recommend that you train Lette and soon you'll have the best running partner anywhere.  The best part is she'll beg you to take her running, which will keep you going on days when your motivation is low and you would otherwise just pack-it-in!  Also, there are some 5K races out there specifically for dog/human teams.  I'm running one called the "Black Sheep" just outside of Philadelphia in April.  Good luck and have fun training!  P.S. Sorry for such a long response.
 

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I disagree on any long distance running until after 18 months or at least until the growth plates are closed.  By pushing the dogs even if you are building up their stamina, you are putting them at a risk of possible injury down the line such as torn ACL and hip displasia.

So IMO my dogs even in agility will never do any high jump or big time distance running until 18 month - 2 years at the least.
 

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http://running.syr.edu/column/19980921.html



If your puppy likes to run around, it does not mean that it is ready for the rigors of long distance running. My resident veterinary expert provides the following guidelines:


Carefully choose your breed. All dogs are not created equal. The ideal running dog is medium-built, weighs 50 to 70 pounds, and has short light hair. Greyhounds and Labrador Retrievers are good runners. Avoid large dogs like Great Danes, and small dogs like Chihuahuas, since their body proportions do not favor distance running.
Avoid engineered breeds. The breathing system of Bulldogs is ill-developed and does not permit intense aerobic activity.
Respect the heat. Dogs do not sweat. They dissipate heat through their paws and mouths. Long-haired dogs like Chows and Collies have more difficulty in the heat. Plan your running route to allow drinking stops, and let the dog run through puddles.
Beware of genetic defects. Pure breeds like German Shepherds suffer debilitating inherited conditions such as hip displasia. Mixed breeds are less susceptible to hereditary problems.
Puppies should not run long distances. Wait until the dog is 2 years old to begin distance training. Start with half a mile every other day. Increase the distance by 10 percent each week. Give the dog a day off for every day of running.
Watch the paws carefully. Dogs do not have the luxury of carbon rubber outsoles. Check the paws before and after every run for any cuts or abrasions.
Run on a soft surface. The best running surfaces for dogs are grass fields and dirt trails. Concrete and hot asphalt impair a dog's ability to dissipate heat through the paws. At the other extreme, frozen roads, ice and salt are harmful to the paws.
Keep the dog on a leash when running on public roads and trails. It is safer for everyone, and it is the law in many communities. A 6-foot leash held to your waist by a belt keeps your hands free and gives the dog room to run around you.
Keep the dog visible to traffic. At night, use a reflective dog harness, a reflective tape the length of the leash, or flashing lights around the collar.
If you must run on roads, avoid busy traffic. The dog's head and nose are at the same height as automobile exhaust pipes.
Train your dog to obey you and ignore distractions. A simple jerk on the leash should bring the dog back to your left side.
Spay or neuter your dog. A dog in heat may spoil a good run.
Never enter a race with your dog. A road race is not a safe place for a dog. Many runners fear dogs, many dogs fear crowds, and starting guns startle dogs
 

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I ran with Sam in the mornings - the most we ever did was 3 miles though. I was always worried about the heat in the summertime so I ran early before work when it was still semi-cool.
 
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