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I've got a 7 month old male pup and we have a wee problem with pulling on the lead. If I walk A-B and then return so B-A, on the outward leg he's as good as gold. He doesn't pull and has got fairly good at checking himself if the leads starts to pull tight.

On the return leg it's a different story, he'll pull pretty much constantly. It's almost like he's in a rush to get back so pulls very slightly just to encourage me to walk quicker. I've tried standing still until he stops pulling and walks back to my side but as soon as start to walk he'll walk to the end of his leash and start to pull. I've tried U-turning and walking the opposite direction but as soon as I turn round he'll walk to the end of his leash and pull. I've tried an anti-pull harness and again he walks as far forward as possible and puts a slight pressure on me.

I'm at a loss. I don't understand why one leg is wonderful and the return leg is stop start as he'll pull ALL the way back. Oh, I've tried walking loops, he walks well until he realises we are on the way back to the house or car and then it's back to pulling.
 

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What kind of set up are you using for walks?
I use an SLL and have found no issues. He was a little bit of a puller before the SLL.
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
What kind of set up are you using for walks?
I use an SLL and have found no issues. He was a little bit of a puller before the SLL.
I use a regular leash around 5ft. I aim to give him around 3ft or so loose. If I shorten or lengthen the leash it makes no difference to his behavior, he walks to the end of his leash and then gently pulls.

I was on a standard collar but have moved to a choker type collar, it's fabric with a metal buckle that stops the collar going too tight. I've set it so it's slightly smaller than the diameter of his normal collar if he pulls. This reduces his pulling force but doesn't stop his pulling.

I've also got an anti pull harness, I forget the make. The leash clips to his chest and it pushes on his shoulder if he pulls, pushing his front paws together. Again it reduces the force at which he pulls but doesn't stop him pulling.

Like I said earlier he only pulls on the way back to the house/car never at the start of the walk. If I stop he stops and then returns to my side only to start pulling within three or four steps. Today I walked around half a mile taking three steps at a time before he pulled and I would stop walking and he'd return to my side, that was on the fabric choker. Today was particularly bad, normally he'll stop pulling for a few hundred yards before starting to pull and we stop start around a dozen times and then cover another hundred yards or so and then repeat the stop start.

His pulling is a constant force if I keep walking he'll match my pace but he'll be out in front on a tight lead and my arm is pulled straight out in front of me. It's not like he picks up a scent and wants to go sniff so pulls hard, in fact he's good at not doing that. He's proved fairly easy to train so far and picked up most commands quickly. He does seem particularly stubborn on the leash
 

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I use a regular leash around 5ft. I aim to give him around 3ft or so loose. If I shorten or lengthen the leash it makes no difference to his behavior, he walks to the end of his leash and then gently pulls.

I was on a standard collar but have moved to a choker type collar, it's fabric with a metal buckle that stops the collar going too tight. I've set it so it's slightly smaller than the diameter of his normal collar if he pulls. This reduces his pulling force but doesn't stop his pulling.

I've also got an anti pull harness, I forget the make. The leash clips to his chest and it pushes on his shoulder if he pulls, pushing his front paws together. Again it reduces the force at which he pulls but doesn't stop him pulling.

Like I said earlier he only pulls on the way back to the house/car never at the start of the walk. If I stop he stops and then returns to my side only to start pulling within three or four steps. Today I walked around half a mile taking three steps at a time before he pulled and I would stop walking and he'd return to my side, that was on the fabric choker. Today was particularly bad, normally he'll stop pulling for a few hundred yards before starting to pull and we stop start around a dozen times and then cover another hundred yards or so and then repeat the stop start.

His pulling is a constant force if I keep walking he'll match my pace but he'll be out in front on a tight lead and my arm is pulled straight out in front of me. It's not like he picks up a scent and wants to go sniff so pulls hard, in fact he's good at not doing that. He's proved fairly easy to train so far and picked up most commands quickly. He does seem particularly stubborn on the leash
Interesting. Seems like he gets excited to head back home and cant help himself. It sounds like you are doing everything right (in my limited knowledge) and maybe after the continued repetition he will finally figure it out.

I wonder if maybe even limiting the couple feet of freedom might help. I'm a bit of a stickler on a leash with my guy, but when on a structured walk I don't let him step in front of me. I always try to keep him right up near my leg and a couple inches back of my lead leg. For me its more of a safety issue because I live in an area with no sidewalks so walking in the road is the only option. He still tries to pull every once in a while but a gentle sideways tug gets him right back in line.
 

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How's his food drive? I used food for training because it worked really well to get my dog's full attention. When he used to leave my side to move ahead of me, I'd walk backwards in a playful manner with a treat in my hand. It was like a short recall, he got the treat, and we'd either walk forward again or go in the other direction. I trained for just short walks since their attention span is not all that great when they're young. I also tried to keep it fun despite frustration. Not easy.
 

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Ok first just forget the harness thingie. Most likely a different tool , is not going to be your solution?? If your dog is otherwise well behaved on leash?? Save for this particular issue??
Then most likely the fault is not with the dog but in your lack of understanding, "what is the deal here???"

He really does not understand what you want??? He knows where "home" is so "what's the issue??" In his head if we're going home, we're going home?? No point in messing around?? My tool of choice, is also a Slip Lead Leash and if you work with Shelters and Rescues a SLL is the only tool those groups will let you use on their dogs. I could easily go off on another wildtangent. But I shall try and refrain from doing so.:)

So to the issue at hand, all you really need is a regular collar and a flat leash. Since the end goal is for the dog "not to be banigin" into the end of the leash ... it really does not matter.

What your most likely missing as an "Effective Correction??" And before you "freak out," that does not mean your yanking the crap out of the dog??? And "effective correction" is simply a "slight tug "Sideways." Not straight back but at an angle and I would also add tyring say "Stay Close" as soon as the dog just starts to forge ahead. If he still progress a slight tug sideways "should stop the forward motion."

You want to make corrections, before he gets to the end of the leash. And for a bit more insight into the leash thing see here.:

http://www.boxerforums.com/training-behavior/179513-slip-lead-leash.html

Welcome Aboard and as always ask questions. :)
 

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My Labrador used to do that, go slow on the way up and rush on the way back, probably because he got his dinner after the walk! My boxer took 2 years to train not to pull on the lead, and she would still do it now if we let her, but she is much much better now.

We were told to treat feed the dog from behind you, difficult to explain in writing but it worked quite well. Also to walk really slowly and just stop and look at the dog when he is in front, or say "behind me". It took absolutely ages to train Lily to do this but I am slightly more stubborn than she is so I won (that one).

I suggest keep on trying. You are doing the right thing and the advice on this forum is excellent.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thanks for the advice.

I've noticed a slight improved over the last couple of days but like most things with dogs I think it's time, repetition and patience.
 

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Thanks for the advice.

I've noticed a slight improved over the last couple of days but like most things with dogs I think it's time, repetition and patience.
Hmmm ... there are really no shades of grey of here?? Either the dog pull's or he does not???


And I can guarantee you, that a "Pro" would not even "notice" the things that you consider "issues." And I am not a "Pro" but I am pretty good at creating "Well behaved calm dogs" that I can take anywhere. :)

Aww well at any rate not trying to brow beat?? Just trying to help.

And in that theme the food , treat thing with Boxer's?? Yeah ... way back in the day I was doing that with my Struddell??? You know to try and her like people. It was first a waste of time and effort. It made no difference. And in fact with the wrong dog could be dangerous! But Struddell was the right dog! And my observation with her, was that treat's only amped her up!" I get to meet a stranger and get a treat also" ... sign me up!! :chair:

I quickly figured it out and just dropped the use of treats with her and people.
Meeting strangers was the treat, that was all she needed. Many years later when I stumbled onto to my first GSD, who did not much care for people ??? I was not willing to use treats, to "trick people into his face/space. It, worked out well. And I can walk dogs that others cannot and no "treats" needed. Walking a dog properly on a loose leash is not about "tricking" a dog into behaving well, it's about leadership. :)

See my links ... trainers in them all deal with dog's with serious issues and none of them use treats for training a dog to walk properly on a loose leash?? Just saying. :)
 
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