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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all-

Hopefully somone can shed some light on my concern at hand.

So Hudson is 14 weeks now and went to the vet 2 weeks ago for his 2nd to last round of shots. As the vet was checking his mouth she saw a white pimple/sore looking thing on the left side of his gums in between the teeth and the wall of his mouth. She said she had never seen anything like it before but was not very concerned thought maybe he bit it or maybe a toy punctured his mouth.

Keep in mind Hudson has been acting completely normal, eats all his food, plays normally. Nothing has changed about his personality. I called the vet today just to follow up and ask her if i should be worried because today when his mouth was open i saw it still there but not as white more a dull white/grey but it kind of looks bigger... the thing is its not easy for me to see that well and i can't get his mouth open as we are working on his nipping problem... he doesnt love his muzzle being touched in that manner (part of being a singleton puppy and not learning bite inhibition)

Either way not to get off track.. has anyone experienced this, seen this or know anything about this?

Please anyone that can help I would really appreciate it... I am worried.

Lauren
 

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Gee, almost sounds like an absess of some sort???? I'd have the vet take a look at it again. From a human point of view, that could be a tooth absess...Good luck.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
it doesn't look like the pictures I searched online...I am going to go to the vet this weekend. I am really nervous.
 

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Don't be nervous. Boxers are susceptible to getting epulis, which is a growth on the gum tissue. They are more likely than not a benign growth. here's an article on it or you can look up epulis in boxers.

If your vet is unaware of epulis in Boxers, FIND A NEW VET!! This is VERY VERY common in the Boxer breed and I would want a vet who is more knowledgeable about breed-specific maladies.


Epulis is the most common type of benign or non-cancerous tumor in dog's mouth. A benign tumor is one that does not spread to other parts of the body. However, an epulis can be "locally invasive," which means that it can grow into the tissues surrounding its initial location. This tumor of the periodontal ligament, which is the structure that holds the dog's tooth in place. Epulides are the most common benign oral tumors in dogs; cats rarely have benign oral tumors. These tumors occur in dogs of any age, but they are generally found in middle-age dogs over six years old.


Epulides have three types and are recognized, grouped by tissue origin. The first is Fibromatous Epulis, they are pedunculated (on a stalk or stem) and non-ulcerating (no interruptions on the outside of the growth). Fibromatous is the most common non-cancerous oral tumor of dogs. These firm, pink tumors arise from the gums. Even a non-cancerous, Fibromatous may become quite large and completely envelop one or more teeth. also may not be possible to tell whether an oral tumor is an epulis or one of the less common, malignant tumors that may occur in the mouth. These growths may become inflamed and ulcerated, causing pain on chewing. They are most common in dogs over 8 years of age.


Other types of Epulis are Ossifying Epulis and Acanthomatous Epulis. Ossifying Epulis includes fibruous tissue and also contains bone cells and these may transform into a cancerous tumors. Ossifying has a greater abundance of hard tissue, osteoid, bone and cementum than fibromatous epulides. Fibromatous and ossifying epulides are now considered to be peripheral odontogenic fibromas, while Acanthomatous epulis is now called canine peripheral ameloblastoma or canine acanthomatous ameloblastoma. Acanthomatous (also called Oral Adamantinoma) is a locally invasive, sometimes recurrent, tumor of the gums of dogs and sometimes cats. These routinely aggressively invade local tissues including bone and they generally do not metastasize, but due to their locally aggressive nature surgical excision must include a full 1-cm margin of clinically normal tissue to prevent recurrence.


An epulis is usually first noticed as a growth on the gum line of the dog's mouth. In rare cases, teeth may be moved from their normal position because of the growth of the epulis. Your pet is initially unaffected by the epulis. However, if the growth becomes large, it could bleed, cause problems with eating, or affect the teeth or jawbone. An epulis is treated by surgically removing it, including a broad margin around the growth. Sometimes, especially with larger tumors, teeth adjacent to the epulis have to be removed. In other cases, portions of the jawbone may need to be removed to cure the condition, for if a portion remains, it will often regrow. Radiation treatment is sometimes used in addition to or instead of surgery for treating large tumors. The prognosis is good if the entire epulis can be removed, so it's best to avoid delay of surgery that would allow the epulis to grow. After surgical removal, the prognosis can be very good depending on the type of epulis removed. A subtype of epulis called an "acanthomatous" epulis can cause more bone problems than the other types, and can be more difficult to completely remove.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks Christine! That was very helpful information and I will discuss with my vet.

As I was looking in Hudsons mouth yesterday or at least trying to I noticed that I didn't describe it well or in the accurate location per say.

The dull white/grey looking mark isnt actually between his teeth and gum wall but its actually under the tongue. Kind of hard to explain.

does that information help at all?
 

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My boxer just turned 6, Vinny, and he looks like he is trying to eat the air. I believe it may be the same thing.
 
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