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Old 08-20-2013, 02:33 PM   #21 (permalink)
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Ignoring is usually what works best for nipping puppies. I don't know how much exercise (mental and physical) they're getting but they may need more because a tired dog is a good dog daily exercise and play is so important and will make a huge difference as it is a positive outlet for their energy. Do u have a KONG or other food puzzles such as: buster cube, everlasting fun ball, squirrel buddy, tug-a-jug, twist as treat? Do you have a crate for both of them? If you don't I recommend getting two of them and when you have simply had it up to HERE with them, fill 2 kongs with peanut butter and lock them in their cage until you can calm down, the dogs will feed off your discouraged feelings. If I were you, tomorrow I would find a clicker, small soft pea sized treats, a treat bag and kennel one pup and keep the other one out. Introduce the clicker first and throughout the morning find anything that is clickable, pup goes to lay on his bed instead of couch C/T! Pup tries to jump on you and get you to play, wait and stay still without giving eye contact and C/T when 4 are on floor. There are tons of clickable behaviors that happen within 5-6 hours. After you eat lunch put up first dog and give a nice frozen peanut butter or yogurt filled kong then grab the other dog and see what clickable behaviors he may do. I have been doing day sessions with an old English Bulldogge for approximately 4-5 hrs a day and at first she was a BRUTE! Jumping up, pulling, running out the door like a madman, & just plain being unruly. I solved it by tethering her to me using a long lead ALL DAY and doing just some basic manners with her a when she isn't in a training session she gets clicked for doing just anything good. She is like a whole new dog!

Throwing a chain a their feet is positive punishment. Positive as in you are adding something. Something the dog does not like.

May I recommend a book for you? And for everyone really, it's called "Puppy Start Right" by Dr Kenneth and Debbie Martin. It is filled full of solutions and great ideas and I loved it. I also am loving "Reaching The Animal Mind" by Karen Pryor.


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Old 08-20-2013, 02:40 PM   #22 (permalink)
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Originally Posted by WholeLottaBoxers View Post

We had the same problem with Lillie when she was a puppy. If we turned our backs, she would jump up and bite at us. You can (1) keep them leashed and step on the leash if they start to jump. Do this along with the "sit" command. They should have just enough leash to be in a sitting position, and their butts have to stay planted and they need to calm down before they are released. Or (2) remove them temporarily to where you can walk away and ignore them. Without any other interaction, we would pick Lillie up and deposit her on the stairs on the opposite side of a baby gate then walk away. She could see us, but she couldn't get to us and we'd ignore her 'til she calmed down. There were days I was putting her on the other side of the gate every five minutes and it was exhausting, but they eventually figure it out. Having littermates, though, you have to have two time-out zones. Putting them in time-out together gives them each other to play with. That won't solve anything.
Yes this is a very good idea. Baby gates or if one is tethered to you then simply tether him to something else if he starts biting and go away for a minute and then come back.



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Old 08-20-2013, 04:20 PM   #23 (permalink)
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Throwing a chain a their feet is positive punishment. Positive as in you are adding something. Something the dog does not like.
I've never heard it called that. I've heard of positive reinforcement, giving the dog a reward in the form of praise, play, food or toys when it behaves in a way that you like. I've never run across the term positive punishment before.
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Old 08-20-2013, 05:07 PM   #24 (permalink)
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Yep, it is positive punishment which is one of the main principles in classical conditioning (behaviorism). In classical conditioning punishment refers to something aversive like the noise the chain makes and not what most people think of as punishment (spanking, etc). Lula does really great with positive reinforcement like giving a command and then giving a treat when she completes the requested task. I found my problem was in getting her attention when there was something happening that was more interesting than getting a treat (running out the door, chasing the cat, lovingly mauling my friends with slobbery kisses). Pairing the creepy sound of the chain with the growl of "Bah" got her attention. After awhile of pairing them, just the growl stops this unwanted behavior. Most people only hear about positive reinforcement and think that anything on the punishment side is abhorrent but it can be very useful.


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Old 08-20-2013, 05:12 PM   #25 (permalink)
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I've never heard it called that. I've heard of positive reinforcement, giving the dog a reward in the form of praise, play, food or toys when it behaves in a way that you like. I've never run across the term positive punishment before.
Oh yes there are four of them!

1.Positive reinforcement=adding something the subject finds desirable

2. Positive punishment=adding something the subject finds undesirable

3. Negative reinforcement=strengthening a new behavior by removing an aversive when you get a new behavior (hunting dogs go through this unfortunately, to get the dog to drop what's in it's mouth, the handler pulls the dogs toes or toenails and the dog opens his mouth to yelp and then the object drops and then the handler stops hurting the dog)

4. Negative punishment=the removal of something the subject finds desirable (dog jumps up on you, whoops no attention for that!)

As a clicker trainer I only use positive reinforcement and negative punishment.



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Old 08-20-2013, 07:12 PM   #26 (permalink)
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they are not being aggressive. its a dominance issue. nipping at you means they want you to do something else than what you are actually doing. the incident when you try to walk back into your house. they jump and nip because they don't want you to go inside. i am not proud of it. but yelling worked for me. no physical contact. just yelling out 'NO' to snap maya out of the state of mind she was in and then walking towards her like i was gonna bash her face into the wall [was not really going to do that tho]. stopped nipping in 2 days. sadly im still struggling with the excitement issue when the guests come in.
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Old 08-20-2013, 07:23 PM   #27 (permalink)
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No offense any dog that bites me I bite them back seems to work pretty well lol at a year old he should know by now that it is not allowed at all...

If it was my dog I would give them a smack if it was aggression and leaving marks you need to show him you are the alpha and pack leader not him
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Old 08-20-2013, 07:26 PM   #28 (permalink)
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He is not nipping if he is leaving marks and if he does it every time she is in the yard then its him being a brat
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Old 08-20-2013, 08:00 PM   #29 (permalink)
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they are not being aggressive. its a dominance issue. nipping at you means they want you to do something else than what you are actually doing. the incident when you try to walk back into your house. they jump and nip because they don't want you to go inside. i am not proud of it. but yelling worked for me. no physical contact. just yelling out 'NO' to snap maya out of the state of mind she was in and then walking towards her like i was gonna bash her face into the wall [was not really going to do that tho]. stopped nipping in 2 days. sadly im still struggling with the excitement issue when the guests come in.
Actually dominance is not the issue:

Problems can arise in our relationships with our dogs due to miscommunication or in the viewing of our relationship in terms of dominance and submission. Fortunately, dogs do not view humans as con-species in which to dominate. We often draw conclusions, wrongfully, about our dogs behavior based on human communication, or erroneously on previous studies of wolf social behavior. You can rest at ease because regardless of your dogs behavior, he is never trying to exert an alpha status or pull rank on any human inside or outside of the home.

Throughout the past several decades, the study of dog behavior has been based on observations of adult wolf behavior. Misinterpretation of wolf behavior and the application if dominance theory are detrimental to our relationship with dogs because it suggests we maintain a dominant or leadership based and controlling relationship with our dogs. Humans never have to be the alpha by holding performing rollovers, scruff shakes, holding dogs muzzle shut, or any other punishment based techniques recommended to maintain rank. Confrontational training methods, whether staring dogs dogs, striking them, or intimidating them With physical manipulation does little to correct improper behavior and can elicit aggressive responses. Dogs do not share dominance hierarchies with people; there is no need to maintain a dominant- or leadership-based relationship with our dogs


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Old 08-21-2013, 08:02 PM   #30 (permalink)
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He really reminds me of a bratty child sometimes. Like if I'm on the phone and standing in the kitchen or something he nips at my feet, it's almost like he's mad he doesn't have my attention at the moment. Luckily knock on wood no bratty fits in 2 days. I've been making them sit before they go outside or come inside, before I put their leashes on to walk, or when we try to play make them sit before I throw the ball for them. I like to believe they're not acting out in aggression, but I just have to keep working with them.
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